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SAVANNAH STATE COt.LBBg LIBRAKI 
I LKE BMNCH 




AMERICA 



THE 



"America the Beautiful" has been chosen as the theme for 
the 1959 Homecoming at Savannah State College, The College-by- 
the-Sea. 

The theme is particularly appropriate since Savannah State 
College boasts one of the most naturally beautiful College campuses 
in the entire United States. Visitors from near and far have ex- 
pressed the fact that SSC's natural beauty is breath-taking. More- 
over, beautiful, modern buildings and lovely co-eds embellish the 
natural beauty of "Dear Old SSC." Yes, SSC is truly a part of 
AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL! 



(OVER 
liss Savannah State and At 
tendants: Left to right. Juliette 
West. Josie Simpson. Del 
Julian. 






iette 
ores 




BEAUTIFUL 



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u 

>- 



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< 

CO 



< 

Z 

o 

< 

z 

ui 

X 

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? beautiful for patriot dream 

That sees beyond the years 
"hine alabaster cities gleam 

Undimmed by human tears! 
America! America! 

God shed His grace on thee 
ind crown thy good with brotherhood 

From sea to shining sea! 

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL 

4th stanza) by Katharine Lee Bates 



m 



The beauty of the printed page . . . the loveliness of 
modern architecture . . . These are a part of 
"America the Beautiful." 




H 



■■ 



" 



*j ; ± ( «J 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

President Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor and 

Copy Editor William H. M. Bowens 

Art and Layout William H. M. Bowens 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Student Assistants Hazel Mungin, Josie 

Simpson, Lois Hughes 

Volume 13 October, 1959 Number 1 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is pub- 
lished yearly in October, December. February, 
March, April, and May by Savannah State 
College. Second Class mail privileges author- 
ized at Savannah, Georgia. 





"MISS SSC" 



ADMINISTRATION BLDG. 





BOYS' DORMITORY 



"~> 




President W. K. Payne 



PRESIDENTS MESSAGE 

It is a pleasure for me to extend greetings for the Savannah 
State College student body, faculty, and staff to our alumni, 
friends, and visitors during the 1959 Homecoming observance. 
We are glad to welcome from the Albany State College, Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Dennis, the "Rams," members of the faculty, 
student body, and their larger family who are participating in 
this celebration. The long, close, and cordial relationships 
which these two State Colleges have enjoyed provide the "cli- 
mate" for a real homecoming. 




I 



Lad y — a p e r p e I u a 
source of the beauty of 
inspiration . . . 






We know that the sportsmanship displayed by the "Rams" 

and the "Tigers" will reflect the finest ideals of the athletic 

programs of the two colleges. As we all play this football game 

today, from our respective positions, we hope to emerge with 

hopes and spirits that have been enriched by mans aspects of 

the game. 

W. K. Payne 
President 



The Paynes 



Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne at Home 








The beauty of charming, tal- 
ented and gracious young 
maidens . . . This is a part of 
"America the Beautiful . . ." 



President and Mrs. W. H. Dennis, Jr. of 
Albany State College are shown at home on 
the Albany campus. 



GREETINGS FROM PRESIDENT WILLIAM H. DENNIS, JR. 

The Albany State College family is indeed happy to extend greetings 
to our sister institution on this your Homecoming. 

Savannah State College and Albany State College have been keen rivals 
through the years. Despite the rivalry, however, we have enjoyed a very 
friendly relationship. It is our hope that this friendly spirit will continue 
to grow as the years progress. 



Congratulations and best wishes. 



Sincerely, 



WILLIAM H. DENNIS, JR. 

President, Albany State College 



Miss Albany State College of 1959-60 is Olivia Elaine 
Blaylock. She is a junior business administration major from 
Albany and is the highest-ranked student at the College. She 
holds membership in the Student Government, the Commercial 
Club, and the Women's League, and considers her hobbies as 
designing and making clothes and jazz. 

Her attendants are Ethel Hardeman, junior business edu- 
cation major from Athens, and Ola Mae Brown, senior music 
education major from Albany. 




























1 a*. TBI 


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MAJORETTES 

Left to right: Minnie P. Hobbs, Elizabeth Dupree, Nellie Ogletree, Jane Morgan, Rose 
Baker, Lillie Becham, Carolyn Vinson. Kneeling, Toledo Riley. 




The beauty and rhythm of marching feet; 
the grace of twirling batons . . . This, too, 
is a part of "America the Beautiful ♦ . ." 




.2i;^v" 



Majorette 
Carolyn Vinson 



Majorette 
Toledo Riley 





Old Gym 






Man-made beauty expressing the creative talents 
of the men of America . . . This, too, is a part of 
the pageant depicting "America the Beautiful ..." 





TECHNICAL CENTER 

Left to right: Annette Brunch, Elois Milton, Lottie Shellman, Mary Brown. 




Infirmary 



Adams Hall 




-*-' ' -A": 



The 1959 Golden Rams of Albany State 
College include (first row, from left) Jesse 
Ivory, Emory Butts, Eddie McAfee, Ernest 
• Hester, Art Gamble, Milt Bos'ic (tri-captain), 
Eddie Robinson (tri-captain), Robert Bowens 
(tri-captain), Tim DuHart, Earl Summerline, 
William Wiggins, Charlie Fambro, and Cal- 
vin Hention; (second row) Eddie Coleman, 
Willie Tcwnsend, Frank Scott, Carl Mitchell, 
James Usher, Art Bain, Ed Nelson, Ransom 
Hill, Jake Bentley, James McFadden, Ernest 
Ward, Charles Price, and Charles Goins; 
(third row) Bennie Hodoes, Abn?r Mackey, 
Robert Smith, Oscar Webster, Clifton Brad- 
ley, Charles Frazier, David Home, Marion 
Dious, Frank Shaw, Steve Jackson, and Gar- 
field Stephens. 




21 



45 



:^^^£MA}£mtmiliie?k 



^NY STATE COLLEGb 1959 FOOTBALL ROSTER 



NAME 
Arthur Bain 
Jacob Bentley 

Jack Bethea 

Milton T. Bostic 
Robert Bowens 
Clifton Bradley 

Emory Butts 

Henry L. Campbell 
Eddie J. Coleman 
Marion Dious 
Tim DuHart 
Charles Fambro 
Charles Frazier 
Arthur Gamble, Jr. 
Charles W. Goins 
Calvin Hention 
. Earnest L. Hesfer 
Ransom Hill 
Bennie Hodges 
David L. Home 
Jesse L. Ivory 
Steve Jackson 
Jesse James 
Eddie L. McAfee 
James McFadden 

Abner Mackey 

Howard T. Magwood 
Carl L. Mitchell 
Ed Nelson 
Charles Price 
Eddie Robinson 
Frank E. Scott 
Mack Sewell, Jr. 
Frank J. Shaw 
Robert L. Smith 
Garfield Stephens 
Earl Summerline 
Willie J. Townsend 
James L. Usher 
Willard K. Walker 
Ernest Ward . 
Oscar Webster 
William Wiggins 



POSITION HEIGHT WEIGHT HOME TOWN 

Quarterback 5'11" 160 Hollywood, Fla. 

Halfback 5'10" 168 Thomson 

Fullback 6'0" 220 Valdosta 

End 6'VA" ... . 195 Athens 

Center-Guard. 5'llVj" 170 Columbus 

Tackle 5'11" 203 Columbus 

End 6'1" 165 Ashburn 

. . Halfback 5'7" 152 Tifton 

Guard 5'8" 160 Thomasvilla 

Tackle 6'2" 180 Athens 

Guard 5'1Hz" 172 Orlando, Fla. 

Tackle 6'2" 1 80 Jackson 

Center 5'11" 185 Wauchula, Fla. 

Quarterback 6'4" 1 75 Quitman 

End 6'1'A" 164 Waycross 

Tackle 6'1" 180 . Donalsonville 

Tackle 6'2W 190 Tifton 

Halfback 5'H" 161 Miami, Fla. 

Halfback 5'11" 150 Brooksville, Fla. 

End 6'VA" 188 Athens 

Fullback 5'10" 175 Haines City, Fla. 

Tackle 6'6" 205 Albany 

Halfback 5'11" 165 Valdosta 

Halfback 5'5'/ 2 " 165 Albany 

Halfback 5'8" 159 Miami, Fla. 

Tackle 6'1" 187 Bainbridge 




Guard 5'1 1 " 

Guard 5'9" 

Halfback 5'8" 

Guard 5'8" 

Halfback 5'8" 

Halfback .57" 

Center 5'11" 

End 6'1" 

Guard 6'3" 

End 6'V/t" 
S'9" 

Halfback 5'10" 

Tackle 5'10' 

Tackle . 6'2" 185 

Halfback 5'9" 155 



169 Moultrie 
160 Bartow, Fla. 

170 Cedartown 
160 Albany 
166 Athens 
172 Richmond, Va. 
140 Athens 
175 Waycross 
180 Quitman 
190 Athens 
160 Tampa, Fla. 
160 Bartow, Fla. 
240 . . Athens 

Columbus 
Athens 



Frank Shaw, 6-2 freshman from 
Waycross, starts at left end for 
Albany State's Rams. 



Fullback 
Halfback 



5'11" 190 '. Washington, 

5'6" 153 Vidalia 



D. C. 




10 



Willie Townsend, ASC's greatest 
running threat, is a freshman half- 
back from Bartow, Fla. 




Vn 












First Row — James Davis, James Colbert, 
James Carthon, B. C. Carswell, John Owens, 
Richard Anderson, John Gordon, Tom Far- 
lows. Second Row — Coach Richard Wash- 
ington, Louis Brown, James Whatley, Vann 
Holland, James Stephens, Hosie Harris, 
Paul Jackson, Ellis Zander, Paul Buchanan, 
Thurston Powell, Morris Carter, Calvin Rob- 
erts, Coach M. Mendenhall. Third Row- 
Trainer Roland James, Elijah McGraw, 
James Bowen, Sam Thompson, Joe Mincey, 
Henry Saunders, William Robbin, John 
Strong, Jesse Carter, Charles Gaines, Lee 
Brown, Manager Charles Tootle. Fourth 
Row — Trainer J. Adkins, Edlie Bell, Joe 
Sweet. 




/ 



James Davis, end-fullback, senior 
— Macon, Georgia. 





Jesse Carter, guard, senior— Ma- 
con, Georgia. 




Henry Wesley, 
Georgia. 



senior— Savannah, 



FOOTBALL ROSTER OF THE SSC TIGERS FOR 1959 




NAME 
. R. Anderson 
. Eddie Belle . 
. James C. Bowen 

. Lee Brown 

Louis Brown . . 
. P. Buchanan . . . , 
. . B. C. Carswell . 
Jesse Carter 

9 Morris Carter . . 

10 James Carthon 

11 James Colbert 

12 Tom Farlow ... 

13 John Gordon . . 

14 Hosie Harris . . . . 

15 Vann Holland 

16 Paul Jackson 

17 Harold Lewis 

18 E. McGraw 

19 J. L. Mincey 

20 John Owens 

21 Vernon Sams 

22 J. Stephens 

23 J. Strong 

24 S. Thompson . 

25 H. Wesley 

26 J. Whatley 

27 L. Williams 

28 E. Zanders 

29 W. Mcintosh 

30 John Sweet . . 

31 Joe L. Sweet 



POSITION 

Back 

. . . Tackle 

. . . Guard. 

Center 

Tackle 

Guard 

Back 

End 

Back 

Guard 

Tackle 

Back 

Guard 

. . Center 

Guard 

Tackle 

Back 

End 

. . . Tackle 

Back 

Center 

Back 

Back 

End 

Back 

Back 

End 

. ... End 

. Tackle 

. Back 

... Back 



HEIGHT WEIGHT HOME TOWN 

. 5'8" 167 Brunswick 

5'11" 187 Macon 

5'8" 190 Albany 

5'9" 168 Cairo 

6'1" 215 Savannah 

6'1" 176 Douglas 

5'7" 165 Brunswick 

5'4" 220 Macon 

5'9" 164 Cairo 

5'1 1" 177 Thomaston 

6'0" 174 Columbus 

5'7" 160 Folkston 




5'11' 

5'ir 

5'10' 

6'1" 

5'9" 

6'3" 

5'11" 

6'0" 

5'9". 

5'11" 

5'11" 

6'1" 



168 Savannah 

168 Quitman 

200 Metter 

190 Reidsville 

156 Savannah 



186 
190 
178 
168 
183 
167 
166 



Savannah 

Reidsville 

Savannah 

Woodbine 

Quitman 

Albany 

Landers 




5'6" 156 Savannah 



5'IT 
6'2" 
6'0" 
6'0". 
5'9" 



147 Anniston, Ala. 

215 Savannah 

.173 Valdosta 

190 Macon 

168 Bainbridge 



Trainers: Roland James, Charles Tootle. Head Coach: 
Assistant Coaches: G. Miller, Savannah State College; 
Reporter: Jolly Stephens. Athletic Director: Theodore Wrig 



. 5'9" 158 Bainbridge 

Richard K. Washington, State University of Iowa. 
M. Mendenhall, South Carolina State College, 
ht. Chairman, Athletic Committee: Elmer J. Dean. 



I ■fsk^Hr^JU^S ma 1 

Co-captain Hosie Harris, senior — Quitman, Georgia; 
Co-captain Elijah McGraw, sophomore — Savannah, 
Georgia; Head Coach— Richard Washington. 




fc 



! l 



DEFENSIVE LINE: Hosie Harris, end, senior— Quit- 
man, Georgia; Joe L. Mincey, tackle, sophomore — 
Reidsville, Georgia; John Gordon, guard, sophomore — 
Savannah, Georgia; James Bowen, guard, junior — 
Albany, Georgia; Charles Gains, tackle, sophomore 
— Albany, Georgia; James Davis, end, sophomore — 
Macon, Georgia. 



Trainer, Curtis Adkins, freshman- 
Columbus, Georgia; Manager, Charles 
Tootle, senior — Savannah,. Georgia; 
Trainer, Roland James, senior— Savan- 
nah, Georgia; Reporter, Jolly Stephens, 
senior — Burlington, N. C. 



11 







Miss SSC and Attendants Stroll 
Delores Julian, Josie Simpson, Juliette West. 




Juliette West 



12 



I Ha 



ail to our lovely quee 
—our chosen representa- 
tives to reign over 
"America the Beau- 
tiful ..." 



us 






Delores Julian 







£>f) 



Game Crowd 



r„ 



he rhythm of dancing 

feet — beauty in motion 

. . . Part of the passing 

parade of "America the 

Beautiful . . .' 








CREATIVE DANCERS 

Left to right : Juanita Quinn, Rose Baker, Carolyn Vinson 




CO-EDS STROLLING 

Left to right: Mary Brown, 
Annette Brunch, Lottie Shell- 
man, Elois Milton. 



13 




Miss AKA and Attendants 

Lois Walker 
Joyce Griffin, Miss AKA 

Nellie Council 




Miss Sigma Gamma Rho 

Delores Williams 





Miss Delta 
Geraldine Lindsey 




14 



Miss Sigma 
Lillian Ferguson 



Miss Kappa 

Emma Sue McCrory 

Elois Milton, Miss Kappa 

Phillis Springfield 



**■ $* 




fl 




Miss Omega 
Margaret Tiggs 




Miss Alpha Phi Alpha 

Carolyn Campbell 
Annette Kennedy, Miss Alpha Phi Alpl 
Juanita Q'uinn 




Miss Zeta 
Jeanette Baker 



r- 



-% 










We salute the fairest among 
us . . . Truly a part of "Amer- 
ica the Beautiful ..." 



Miss Senior and Attendants 

Lois Hughes 

Doris Porter, Miss Freshman 

Thelma Griffin 





Miss Junior and Attendants 

Laura Garwin 

Gloria Byrd, Miss Junior 

Yvonne McGlockton 



ss Freshman and Attendants Miss Sophomore and Attendants 

Iris Eason Fannie Jackson 

Ruby Futch, Miss Freshman Emma S. McCrory, Miss Sophomore 

Marilyn Cole 



Verneta Wright 




Miss Trade 

Louvenia Harris 



Miss Wright Hall 

Delores Wyche 




15 






r - 

ft* tk 



\ 



Miss Practical Nurse 

Mrs. Hattie Wilson 

Beatrice Hallman, Miss Practical Nurse 

Mrs. M. H. Thompson 




Miss SNEA 



Alice Kight 

Lillian Wright, Miss SNEA 

Jacquelyn Walker 



16 




*. * 



i 






Miss Business 

Willie Mae Julian 
Mima Miller, Miss Busine 



Geneva Zeigler 



Miss Camilla Hubert Hall 

Bernice Cofer 

Betty Shaffer, Miss CHH 

Ora D. Lawrence 



Miss YMCA-YWCA 

Dorothy Brown 



Miss Home Economics 
Dorothy Lawlon 





The beauty of line, of form, 
of elegant motion . . . This 

tis "America the Beau- 
tiful . . ." 



u- 



'" — l':- .-..''A 



Cheerleaders 





v w * \ 



Elois Milton 



O young fair maidens, 

Venus' 1 counterparts, 

"America the Beautiful" 

is proud of thee . . . 



%±\~..i*F" „ !'.■;■:'.# ■■:»,,., 




Lillian Wright 



17 



': 






warn 



Alumni in Action 



I 



Banquet Scene at Atlanta 
Alumni Meetin 








ATLANTA ALUMNI 

Left to right: Walter Leonard, Master 
of Ceremonies: Arthur Richardson. 
President. Atlanta Chapter; Prince Jack- 
son. Jr.. College Alumni Secretary; 
Leonard D. Law, National President; 
Charles Hubert, who introduced Mr. 
Jackson. 



PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Left to right: Mrs. Helen Logan, Mrs. 
Caynelle Jonas, Mrs. Walter Leonard, 
Mrs. Hazel J. Hardney, Miss Bertha Dil- 
lard, Mrs. Arie 0. Moreland. 




L. D. Law, National Alumni 
President, addresses student 
body at vesper services. 



18 




Fi 




Mrs. Lucille Mooring 




\> our Alumni ijueens wno 
have added experience, wis- 
dom and the beauty of 
achievement to physical 
beauty, we salute you as a 
part of the passing parade of 

ki America the Beautiful. , ' > 




Mrs. Louise Milton 



Mrs. Amanda Cooper 



19 





j _5s_.:'- •— ll 



Sol C. Johnson Laboratory High School 



p- 



H 



loineeoininjj 



Ice 



bcrs 






Frank Tharpe, Chairman; Mrs. Geraldine H. 
\bernathy, Felix J. Alexis, Mrs. Martha Avery. 
Eddie Bivins, Leroy Brown, Mrs. Ella Fisher. 
Mrs. Dorothy Hamilton, Herbert C. Harris, Miss 
I.nella Hawkins, Prince Jackson, Mrs. Louise 
Owens, E. J. Jackson, David Philson, Henry Bal- 
loon, Eddie Bryant, Floyd Hawkins, Jimmy Veal, 
Delores Julian. Juanita Howard. James Austin. 
Al Cheatham. 




Frank Tharpe, Chairman 



6 



SAVANNAH 
STATE 
COLLEGE 



; w :> •% 



"** 



■ • 



SAVANNAH 
GEORGIA 



-«fc 




President and Mrs. William K. Payne chat with students 
at the President's annual Lawn Party for seniors. 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION BULLETIN 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



The college is located in Chatham County, adjacent to the town of 
Thunderbolt and to Savannah, Georgia's oldest city and chief seaport. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty-six acres, presents a 
setting of matchless natural beauty. Among the more outstanding are the 
attractively designed and modernly constructed Camilla Hubert Hall, 
housing one hundred and seventy-five women; Adams Hall, the dining hall, 
serving five hundred students at a time; Meldrim Hall, consisting of admin- 
istrative offices, the auditorium, and some classrooms; Willcox and Wiley 
Gymnasiums, headquarters of the Physical Education Department. 

More recently completed structures are the central heating plant and 
a men's dormitory. The heating plant, powered by three individual auto- 
matic oil burning units of 575 horsepower, generates heat to meet the needs 
of the entire campus. Wright Hall, the new dormitory, is an ultramodern, 
fireproof structure which comfortably houses 210 men. An air-conditioned 
library, a million dollar technical and science building and a modern 
laboratory high and elementary school help to make Savannah State one 
of the best. 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN— 
President, Dr. William K. Payne; Director of Public 
Relations, Wilton C. Scott; Photographer, Robert 

Mobley. 

Volume 13 December, 1959 Number 2 

The Savannah Stale College Bulletin is published yearly in October, 
December, February, March, April, and May by Savannah State College. 
Second Class mail privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 




THE LIBRARY 





ADAMS HALL 



RICHARD R. WRIGHT HALL 





WILCOX HALL 



GYMNASIUM 



riMpwea (mL Objects 



Savannah State College, a unit of the University System of Georgia, is a college of 
applied arts and sciences, teacher education, business administration, and industrial 
technology. 

The college has two main purposes. It affords students an opportunity to acquire 
an education that will enable them to live effectively in a democratic society. It provides 
continuing educational and cultural services for the people of Georgia. 

A worth-while education, as the faculty conceives it, demands the full, rounded 
development of the individual. Consistent with this large purpose the institution has 
several major objectives. Specifically, the total college program is designed to help 
students: 

1. To gain basic preparation, personal qualities, and skills which are essential 
alike to further study, earning a living, and personal well-being; 

2. To understand the nature of mental, emotional, and physical health and to 
practice habits conducive to sound personal and community health; 

3. To attain a sharp awareness of social and civic responsibility and live daily as 
good citizens; 

4. To understand the common phenomena of man's physical environment and 
use scientific advances for human welfare; 

5. To cherish a discerning knowledge of man's cultural heritage, respect for 
foreign peoples and cultures, and aesthetic appreciation of the creative artistic 
expressions of the human spirit; 

6. To know and live by those moral and spiritual values which refine and exalt 
human life. 

To attain these objectives the college (a) offers formal instruction organized within 
seven divisions — Business Administration, Education, Humanities, Natural Sciences, 
Social Sciences, Technical Sciences, Home Study; (b) selects and upgrades teachers, 
counsellors, personnel workers, administrative and auxiliary services personnel; (c) gives 
students due responsibility in making their own educational decisions and performing 
work-aid duties, participating in government of the college, extra-class activities, campus 
life, and religious services; (d) draws upon all available intellectual, cultural, techni- 
cal, and spiritual resources to enrich the lives of students. 

Briefly then, every teacher, every facility, every arrangement here serves two main 
purposes. It is that boys and girls may develop into mature men and women who live 
effectively in the community, the state, and nation. It is that life may be made richer 
for the people of Georgia. 

Savannah State College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools and by the Department of Education of the State of Georgia. 



a3^o 




X)vmion of 

Students expecting to major in Business should be- 
come as proficient as possible in Mathematics and Eng- 
lish. Thus, prospective Business majors should take as 
much Mathematics and English as possible at the high 
school level. While not essential, students may also take 
such courses as Bookkeeping, Typing, Shorthand, and 
other General Business subjects offered in their respec- 
tive high schools. 

One of the advantages of majoring in Business is 
that one is preparing himself for a wide variety of 
employment possibilities. Business majors may not only 
teach but they may operate their own business estab- 
lishments, work in private industry, and work for the 
government — national, state and local. 

More specifically, Business majors may work as 
bookkeepers, accountants (public and private), sales- 
men, secretaries, stenographers, typists, economists, busi- 
ness managers and executives. They may also own and 
operate their own business establishments. 

To realize the aims of a person desiring training in 
Business, Savannah State College's Division of Business 
offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Business Administration, and a terminal, two-year pro- 
gram leading to a certificate of proficiency. 

A student in Business Administration may pursue 
a major in one of four areas: (1) General Business 
Administration, (2) Economics, (3) Secretarial Science, 
and (4) Business Education Major. 



Ike CuMXadfarvi 



The formal instructional program of Savannah State 
College comprises the general curriculum, areas of major 
and minor concentration, and terminal curricula. The 
program is organized within these seven divisions: 

The Division of Business Administration 

The Division of Education 

Department of Elementary Education 

Department of Secondary Education 

Department of Health. Physical Education, and 
Recreation 

The Division of Humanities 
Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 

The Division of Natural Sciences 
Department of Biology 
Department of Chemistry 
Department of Mathematics and Physics 

The Division of Social Sciences 

The Division of Technical Sciences 
Department of Home Economics 
Department of Industrial Technology 

The Division of Home Study 




MECHANICAL DRAWING 



T?iahaIovi of Educfllm 



The Division of Education at Savannah State College 
is organized around the concept which conceives that 
teaching is a distinctive and definitive profession. In 
common with the other great professions of our culture, 
teaching, to be worthy, involves acquisition by the 
practitioner of fine, highly developed sensitivities and 
specialized knowledges and competencies. Such an in- 
dividual must also possess a genuine, practical philo- 
sophical and psychological approach to learning within 
the framework of the culture in which the educational 
program exists. 

The Division provides programs for preparation of 
teachers, within the frame of reference described above, 
in the following areas: 

( 1 1 Elementary Education, 

(2) English, 

(3) General Science, 

(4) Industrial Education, 

(5) Mathematics, 

(6) Music Education. 

( 7 ) Social Studies and 

(8) Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
The Division maintains constant contact with the 
Division of Certification of the State Department of 
Education and makes every effort to be assured that 
successful completion of any of the programs by a 
student is tantamount to satisfaction of certification 
requirements. 



V'MiMj of tW/waito 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



Basically. English major has a practical purpose. It 
seeks subtle values. It aims, in a word, in producing a 
broadly-educated human being. // seeks to develop the 
mind, to make it more flexible and more perceptive. It 
acquaints the student with the great literary works of 
our culture and reveals the operation of the human 
spirit in our civilization. It cultivates an interest in 
books and reading which can give him life-long satisfac- 
tion. Although the study of English gives the student a 
first-hand knowledge of literature and the related arts, 
its ultimate aim is a quality of mind rather than any 
mere accumulation of information. It seeks to provide 
a solid educational foundation on which the student 
may later base the specialization required for any busi- 
ness or profession. Students of literature believe that 
the cultivated mind is the best guarantee which educa- 
tion can offer to ultimate success in life. 

If the student who majors in English wishes to con- 
tinue his education in graduate or professional school, 
he has a wide variety of opportunities open to him. The 




SURVEYING 




CHEMISTRY 




PHYSICS 







ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 




following list comprises only a few of the areas an 
English major is prepared to enter: 

M.A. and Ph.D.: He may pursue graduate degrees 
in English, Comparative literature. Foreign langu- 
age, linguistics, history, and other subjects. 

M.B.A. He may enter a graduate school as a candi- 
date for the degree of Master of Business Ad- 
ministration. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES: An English major is 
regarded as sound preparation for specialized 
professional training in LAW . THEOLOGY, 
SOCIAL WORK, HEARING AND SPEECH 
CORRECTION. LIBRARY SCIENCE, and— by 
a number of Medical Schools— MEDICINE. 

Some idea of the applicability of English to a variety 
of vocations may be gained from the following list of 
positions often held by men and women who have 
majored in this subject: 

ADVERTISING: Copywriter. research worker, 
editor, executive. 

BUSINESS: Personnel counselor, advertising copy- 
writer, advertising manager, salesman (particu- 
larly in dealing with specialized and often highly 
educated customers), executive. 

EDUCATION: Teacher, research worker, counselor, 
principal, superintendent. 



ENTERTAINMENT: Writer, director, 
scenarist, research worker. 



a c t o r, 



FOREIGN TRADE: Positions requiring knowledge 
of foreign countries and their languages. 

GOVERNMENT: Administrative officer, research 
worker, foreign affairs officer. 

INTERNATIONAL AGENCIES: Employee of United 
Nations, UNESCO, World Health Organization, 
NATO, Institute of International Education, Red 
Cross, etc. 

JOURNALISM: Reporter, feature writer, editorial 
writer, foreign correspondent, critic (of music, 
books, plays, movies, politics, foreign affairs, 
business trends, etc.), managing editor, publisher. 

PUBLISHING: Writer (general or specialized), 
proofreader, editor, research worker, lexico- 
grapher, salesman, executive. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS: Director, counselor, writer, 
editor. 

RADIO AND TELEVISION: Writer, editor, actor, 
news commentator, research worker, executive. 

LIBRARY WORK: Librarian (an) of many special- 
ized duties: reference, business, fine arts, chil- 
dren's, etc.). 

WRITING: Magazine writer, novelist, playright, 
specialized writer for engineering firms, indus- 
tries, banks, trade journals, or house organs of 
all kinds. 




DEPARTMENT OF 
FINE ARTS 



As for opportunities for employment in the field of 
Music, perhaps the greatest demand is for teachers in 
the public schools. A Music teacher can also find open- 
ings in parochial schools, colleges, universities, con- 
servatories, private schools, and music studios. Instru- 
mental and vocal ensembles, concert soloists, supervisors, 
and consultants are also drawn from the ranks of 
teachers. 

Music Therapists are growing in abundance in 
civilian and veteran hospitals, in clinics for the handi- 
capped, and in corrective institutions. 

Instrumentalists have opportunities in the bands 
and orchestras of the Armed Forces, in symphony 
orchestras, concert bands, dance bands, night clubs, 
radio, television, motion pictures, small ensembles, and 
as concert soloists. 

Vocalists can be employed as church soloists, in 
church choirs, in community choral groups, on radio and 
television, in motion pictures, in dance bands, in night 
clubs, in concert choral groups, in opera choruses, as 
opera stars, and as concert soloists. 

The area of church music, consisting of opportunities 
as minister of music, organist, or choir director, is in 
need of good musicians in both the Christian churches 
and Synagogues. 

The composer, arranger, the orchestrator, and the 
copyist all have opportunities as teachers of theory and 
composition. In addition to educational and art music, 
openings also exist for them in commercial music such 
as in popular areas, motion pictures, radio, and tele- 
vision. 

The conductor can be a teacher in a college, uni- 
versity, conservatory, or church, and can find additional 
employment in radio, television, dance bands, concert 
bands, symphony orchestras, opera companies, or choral 
groups. 

The tuner-technician of pianos and other instruments 
pursues a related career. He may engage in private busi- 
ness or in a factory or as a dealer, or he may become 
a teacher in colleges, universities, conservatories, or 
private schools. 

In music industry another facet of a music career 
embraces the publishers of music and musical periodicals, 
the manufacturers of all kinds of musical instruments and 
phonograph records, the managers and booking agents 
of musicians, the producers of musical shows, salesmen 
of music, instruments, records, and artists, and editors 
and critics of newspapers and periodicals. 

Music Librarians have opportunities in colleges, uni- 
versities, conservatories, public libraries, motion picture 
studios, orchestras, bands, and radio and television 
stations. 

All in all, for the serious, ambitious music students 
there are several opportunities for a career in music. 
It is the primary responsibility of the student, however, 
to seek guidance in the area of his interests and 
capabilities, and once having decided on his particular 
direction, he is charged with the supreme challenge and 
duty to become the best person available in his area. 




ELECTRICAL 

I 




ELECTRONICS 




CHEMISTRY 




DEPARTMENT OF 
MODERN LANGUAGES 



Outside of the field of education, a person with a 
major or a minor in a foreign language can find em- 
ployment in several areas. First, there is the area of 
organizations of a more or less international character. 
Because of the nature of its work, there is almost a 
constant demand at the United Nations Headquarters 
for men and women who are proficient in foreign 
languages. They may find employment as interpreters, 
translators. U.N. guides (women only), clerks, typists 
and stenographers. Two other organizations more or less 
international in character where linguists are needed 
are the World Health Organization and the International 
Monetary Fund. In the former of these organizations 
there are opportunities available overseas for young men 
and women who have college degrees and who know 
French or Spanish. The latter organization reports that 
it is interested in economics and secretarial personnel 
and that, although a knowledge of a foreign language 
is not always essential, it is considered useful. The 
second area is that of government employment. Some 
positions are available with the government of such 
states as New York, Texas and California, but most of 
the openings are found in the various agencies and 
departments of the Federal Government. For example, 
a student with a major or a minor in Spanish may find 
employment with the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service of the Department of Justice. The Department 
of State needs translators and escort-interpreters. It also 
needs linguists for its Foreign Service. In the National 
Library of Medicine, connected with the Department of 
Health. Education and Welfare, there are openings for 
young men and women with degrees in library science 
who are also competent in one or more foreign langu- 
ages. This library also has positions available in its 
indexing operations for persons with college degrees 
with a knowledge of foreign languages plus education 
and experience in the medical and biological sciences. 
The Department of the Army would like to have some 
secretaries for duty overseas, who are able to speak the 
language of the country to which they are assigned and 
who are also able to perform research work. Then, in 
the Library of Congress, the Personnel Director will 
accept applications for the position of sub-professional 
librarian. Those applying for this position must have 
two or more years of college, some knowledge of a 
foreign language and, in many instances, ability to type. 
There are positions available also with the National 
Security Agency, the Central Intelligence Agency, the 
U. S. Information Agency, and several others. 



DORMITORY ROOM 



10 



mm rw 




■^.^■■x ■*: t „ J ^ w ^ 






The Division of Natural Sciences is one of the major 
areas of instruction at Savannah State College. This 
division is staffed by well qualified personnel; as a 
whole, people who have had long experience in the teach- 
ing profession, and graduates from some of the best 
universities in this Country. All of the staff members 
are very well acquainted with the problems of our 
present-day youths. They realize that the young people 
of today are frustrated; they know that young people 
need help in making decision in a world in which there 
are many, many opportunities. 

Savannah State College, through its Division of 
Natural Sciences, is ready to continue helping young 
people to prepare themselves for living. With the large 
science-technical building near its completion, the Col- 
lege is better prepared to render a greater service in the 
area of science than heretofor. Some of the offerings 
are (1) PREMEDICAL WORK. In this age when health 
is being given priority in our thinking, the need for 
well trained doctors of medicine cannot be over stressed. 
WE NEED TRAINED DOCTORS TODAY. We also 



need other health personnel: dentists, nurses, pharmacists, 
etc. (2) WE NEED TRAINED CHEMISTS. We need 
the trained chemists to help us live better; develop new 
products for human consumption; work in our defense 
plants, and in many other ways. (3) WE NEED 
TRAINED BIOLOGISTS. We need the trained biologists 
to help others to understand the living organisms with- 
in our environment; for research work in medicine, 
dentistry, and other areas including health. (4) WE 
NEED TRAINED MATHEMATICIANS AND PHYSI- 
CISTS. The Space Age, the launching of satellites, 
preparation of machines for defense purposes, are only 
a few reasons why we need men well prepared in 
mathematics and physics. 

Graduates from Savannah State College who prepared 
themselves in the area of the Natural Sciences are doing 
well in various jobs. Some are engaged in research 
work in health; some in industry; others have entered 
medical schools and are now practicing medicine, 
dentistry, or nursing; some are medical laboratory 
technicians; and still others are in the teaching pro- 
fession. 



11 








The Division of Social Sciences offers two major 
programs for persons interested in the social sciences. 
Curriculum I leads to the B.S. degree in the social 
sciences with a concentration in history. Curriculum II 
leads to the B.S. degree in the social sciences with a 
concentration in Sociology leading to the professional 
study of social work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the sec- 
ondary school should enroll in the Teacher Education 
Program and pursue the B.S. degree in Education with 
a concentration in the social sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in 
careers in: law, government service, diplomatic service, 
general research. Young Men's Christian Association, and 
Urban League work. Curriculum II is designed for 
persons interested in careers as: social workers, proba- 
tion officers, vocational counselors, camp counselors, 
employment interviewers, juvenile court workers, wel- 
fare fund workers, and immigration service workers. 



12 




UUHAVWl of 



There is urgent need for people with special skills 
and training — people who are able to help translate 
scientific ideas and discoveries into useful products and 
services. This is the role of the technician. 

The technician is a special kind of person, and in 
certain fields he assists in planning and development 
work, estimating, research work, and is ofteji called 
upon to perform jobs ranging from simple testing 
projects to tasks requiring a high degree of creative 
and technical talents. 

Of one thing we can be certain: We will need more 
technicians on the research teams, in the laboratories, 
in the factories, on the assembly line, in the installing, 
upkeeping and promotion of sales. All of these will re- 
quire many different types of trained technicians. 



The following fields offer a great opportunity for em- 
ployment as technicians: 

1. Automotive Technology 

2. Building Construction 

3. Electric Power 

4. Diesel 

5. Chemical 

6. Instrumentation 

7. Air Conditioning 

8. Aviation 

9. Electronics 





- 






13 




Actuals 



Savannah State College puts great emphasis upon a 
rich and varied religious life program. Through its 
religious activities, the college seeks to develop an 
understanding of and an appreciation for the place of 
religion in everyday living, to deepen spiritual insight, 
and to make the practice of Christian principle a vital 
part of the life of the well educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed by the College 
Minister. The Sunday School, YMCA and YWCA, the 
Newman Club, and the annual Religious Emphasis Week 
provide opportunities for religious growth and develop- 
ment, under the supervision of the Religious Life Com- 
mittee. 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment 
of a well-rounded education by providing many oppor- 
tunities for students to participate in a wide range of 
significant activities. Through the efforts of Organized 
groups, programs are planned for the social, religious. 
and cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Student Council, composed of representatives of 
all classes, works with the administration in the govern- 
ment of the college. It works also with the various 
campus organizations and sponsors projects for the 
general welfare of the student body. 

The choir, band, men's glee club, and women's glee 

lub, are open for membership to all students interested 

n music. These groups perform not only locally, but 

are in constant demand for special programs throughout 

'.he state. 

The Tiger's Roar, official student newspaper, is pub- 
fished exery six weeks by students under supervision of 
the Public Relations Office. 

The college yearbook. The Tiger, is a schoolwide 
student project which is published also through the 
Public Relations Office. 

The following organizations also provide media for 
expression of student interests: Art Club, Business Club. 



Camera Club. Collegiate Counsellors, Creative Dance 
Group, Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, Economics 
Club, Future Teachers of America (NEA), Home Eco- 
nomics Club. Newman Club. Savannah State College 
Players Guild, Social Science Club. Student Loan As- 
sociation. Tiger's Roar. Trade Association, Ushers Club, 
Varsity Club, Veterans Club, YMCA, YWCA, and the 
Women's Council. 

The following national social fraternities are organ- 
ized on the campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, 
Phi Beta Sigma, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organ- 
ized on the campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma Gamma 
Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor societies, Alpha Kappa Mu and 
Beta Kappa Chi have chapters on the campus. 

The Department of Health and Physical Education 
conducts a well-rounded intramural athletic program of 
seasonal activities for men and for women. Utilizing 
group games and various sports for their full educa- 
tional and health values, the program features football, 
basketball, track and field, tennis, boxing, golf, baseball, 
Softball, volley-ball, field hockey, and badminton. 

A member of the Southeastern Athletic Conference, 
Savannah Slate College maintains competition in all 
sports sponsored by the conference. 

Savannah State College also holds membership in 
two national athletic associations: NAAC and NIAA. 

To complement formal education on the campus, the 
college provides many activities for cultural enrichment. 
Student assemblies, institutes, motion pictures, lectures, 
art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, athletic contests, 
hobby groups, and tours contribute to the general wel- 
fare of the community. 



14 



AAxnmml^cm^ 



Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present 
evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound health, 
and interest in a specific course of study are eligible to apply 
for admission to the several departments of the college. 

Formal Application Required 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal 
application and thereafter submit such credentials as may be 
needed to support the application. Admissions correspondence 
should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 

Savannah State College 

State College Branch 

Savannah, Georgia 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed directly 
from the applicant's former school to the Director of Admissions. 
The application form with instructions may be obtained by writing 
the Director of Admissions. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 
NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money order, 
cashier's check, or certified check payable to SAVANNAH 
STATE COLLEGE. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 45.00 $135.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 8.00 24.00 

Student Group Insurance (see below) 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges— Day Student *$ 61.00 *$183.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 167.00 501.00 

Total Charges — Boarding 

Students * $228.00 *$684.00 



The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges are 
assessed where applicable. Please see "Explanation of Fees." All 
charges are subject to change at the end of each quarter. Normal 
cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00 per quarter. Stu- 
dents are required to secure all books, supplies and tools neces- 
sary for satisfactory completion of courses for which they are 
enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
Students are required to meet their financial obligations promptly 
as condition of their remaining in college. Students granted 
scholarships or work-aid will be notified in writing and credit 
will be made to their accounts accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring with 
them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated on the Schedule 
of Fees. 

Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they maintain 
satisfactory scholastic averages. These work opportunities include 
such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, library work, waiting 
tables, washing dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and 
unskilled work in the several trades and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to 
selected students who meet the required standards of scholastic 
merit, high character, general promise, and superior achievement 
in certain specific areas of the college program. 

Students interested in National Defense Loan Funds, should 
write Chairman of Student Personnel Services, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Ga. 






15 



THE BULLETIN 



THE ALUMNI ISSUE 



Anne and John Lawton, 
'38, "First Lady" and Presi- 
dent of the Georgia Teach- 
ers and Education Associa- 
tion. 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



SAVANNAH 



GEORGIA 



About This Issue 

The College has the distinction this 
year of haying a son moved up to the 
presidency of the Georgia Teachers and 
Education Association and a daughter 
being selected as "Georgia Teacher of 
the Year."' These two positions are the 
two highest in their respective categories 
and it is indeed unique for any College 
to have both a son and daughter to hold 
these positions concurrently. 

It is also a distinction to have many 
of our graduates in the various counties 
to be selected as "Teacher of the \ ear " 
by their local school organizations. 

Do you wonder about commencements 
of the past years? As a special treat to 
vou. we are running a picture of the 
Class of 1900 and the complete Com- 
mencement Program. This incidentally 
was the first co-ed class and only one 
member survives today. This person is 
Mrs. Florance Fields Law who is the 
mother of Leonard D. Law. our Na- 
tional President. She was given special 
recognition and honors at the Alumni 
Banquet, June 4, 1960. We know you 
will want to congratulate Mrs. Law. so 
you may send your congratulatory mes- 
sages to her at 521 East Henry Street. 
Savannah. Georgia. 

Have you ever imagined what a beau- 
tiful picture three N-ational Queens make 
when the camera catches them all at 
once? Wait until you see Miss Louise 
Milton, Miss Francine Howard and Mrs. 
Sadie D. Steele in the beautiful shot that 
Bob Mobley caught at the Georgia 
Teachers and Education Association 
Convention in Savannah. 

The Maceo Homes had the distinction 
of receiving their. Master degrees from 
Butler University together at the same 
Commencement, "1959." 

We were able to add another Doc- 
torate to our growing list when Carlton 
Moss received his Ed.D. from the Uni- 
versity (jf Oklahoma. 

Do you remember the children of Dr. 
and Mrs. W. K. Payne? Most of us re- 
member them as "Little Rosalyn" and 
William Kenneth when they used to run 
around the campus. Recently, Rosalyn 
returned home for a few da\s with her 
husband and two children. As a very 
special treat to you, on this inside cover, 
we are running two pictures of this 
wonderful "homecoming ' so you can see 
how much "Little Rosalyn" has accom- 
plished since you last saw her. 

As you go through this issue, you 
will find many other surprises. 




«*SS®&?.V - 



President and Mrs. W. K. Payne were visited recently by their daughter. Dr. 
Rosalyn Payne Epps, son-in-law, Dr. Charles H. Epps, Jr., and their grandsons, 
Charles H. Epps, III, and Kenneth Carter Epps. Dr. Rosalyn Payne Epps is now 
serving on the Pediatrics Staff of Freedman Hospital and is a member of the 
Howard University Medical College Faculty. Dr. Charles II. Epps, Jr., is special- 
izing in Orthopedic Surgery al the District of Columbia Hospital. Please observe 
the proud expressions on the faces of Dr. and Mrs. Payne. 




THE CLASS 
OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 



of the 

GEORGIA STATE INDUSTRIAL 
COLLEGE 

Requests the honor of your presence 
at their 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

June ^th and 5th 

COLLEGE HALL 

CLASS ROLL 
Ethel Wiona Bisard 

Florence Alethia Fields 

Samuel Arthur Grant 

James W. Haigler 
Emanuel Williamson Houston 
Etta Maud Mcintosh 

Edward Anderson Overstreet 
Mamie Logan Whitmire 

CLASS OFFICERS 

President Emanuel W. Houston 

Vice President Florence A. Fields 

Secretary Samuel A. Grant 

Treasurer Etta M. Mcintosh 



MEMOIRS OF CLASS OF 1900 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
Tuesday, June 5th, 11:00 A.M., 1900 



Motto: Diligentia Non Astutia 

Music — Materville March College Band 

Invocation 

Chorus — Estudiantiana College Choir 

Oration — "The Purpose of Modern Education" 

Emanuel W. Houston. Savannah. Ga. 

Essay — An Unknown Heroine Florence A. Fields. Savannah, Ga. 

Piano Duet — Charge of the Uhlans Mamie V. Edwards. Etta Mcintosh 

Essay— "Music" ^ Etta M. Mcintosh 

Music College Orchestra 

Commencement Address Rt. Rev. W. J. Gaines, D.D. 

Chorus — Spring Time College Choir 

Addresses by Gov. A. D. Candler. 
Prof. Booker T. Washington, and others 



Music — El Capitan 



Presentation of Diplomas 
Benediction 



College Band 




Class o 



President and Mrs. W. K. Payne 
greet three "60's" at the door as the 
"President's Reception for Seniors" 
is about to start. The "60's" are 
(left to right) Willie B. Lester of 
Jefferson, Lillian F. Philson of 
Warner Robbins, and James Deen 
of Alma. Does this scene bring back 
memories? 



Reverend Edgar P. Quarterman, 
a son of the College, dynamically 
drives home his point as he delivers 
the 83rd Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Reverend Quarterman received his 
degree from Savannah State in 
1944. 




ALVERTIA POLITE 

Savannah, average — 2.527 — graduated 
Magna Cum Laude 



JAMES DEEN 

Alma, average — 2.444 — graduated 
Cum Laude 



ROSALYN SCURDY 

Savannah, average — 2.389 — graduated 
Cum Laude 



Dublin Alumni Organizes 

On May 17, 1960, the Alumni in Laurens 
County met and became the latest member of 
the Savannah State College National Alumni 
Association. 

The following officers were elected : 

President Timothy U. Ryals 

Vice President William Wolthour 

Secretary Laura Irwin 

Assistant Secretary Carolyn Wotson 

Treasurer Nathaniel Wotson 

Reporter Martha Edwards 

Co-Chairmen Bernice Myers and Elise Saxby 
Program Committee 

A total of 14 members attended the first 
meeting and everyone pledged themselves to 
do all they can for the upbuilding for Savan- 
nah State College. 

1960 Graduates Pay 1960-61 
Scholarship Contributions 

James Nevels and Lillian W. Wright re- 
ceived their B.S. degrees about 12:15 p.m. and 
were inducted into the Savannah State College 
National Alumni Association about 12:25 p.m., 
June 8, 1960. 

About 3 p.m., June 8, 1960, Mr. Nevels and 
Mrs. Wright found Prince Jackson, Jr., Col- 
lege Alumni Secretary, and paid their $5 
Alumni Scholarship Fund dues to become the 
first donors to the Fund for 1960-61. The 
Alumni is glad to see this kind of spirit. 
Perhaps some of this spirit will rub off on 
other alumni and we can realize that $5,000 
Scholarship in one year. We have been trying 
for more than 4 years without success. 

Ocilla, Douglas and Fitzgerald 
Areas to Form Alumni Chapter 

William Witherspoon, Lee Mark Daniels 
and Clarence Lofton of Fitzgerald, Ocilla and 
Douglas respectively will organize an alumni 
chapter in that area at the beginning of the 
1960-61 school year. The need of a chapter 
in that area is obvious because there are six 
graduates in Ocilla, more than ten in Fitz- 
gerald and about ten in Douglas. 

Those in Ocilla are Mrs. Thelma Sneed, 
Special Education Teacher; Miss Harriette 
D. Hawthorne, Home Economics Teacher: Mrs. 
Hermenia M. Smith, Chairman of the Social 
Studies Department; Miss Iris Parrish, Busi- 
ness Teacher; Mr. Joseph Mitchell Mathe- 
matics Teacher, and L. Mack Daniels, Assist- 
ant Principal and Counselor. 



Bulloch County Chapter 
Entertains William James 
High School Seniors 

In a program designed to attract more 
Statesboro students to Savannah State Col- 
lege, the Statesboro Alumni entertained the 
senior class with a social tea. Dean T. C. 
Meyers spoke to the seniors on The Values of 
Life. John Lawton, president of the Georgia 
Teachers and Education Association and prin- 
cipal of Willow-Hill Junior High School, made 
the introductory remarks. Mrs. Marie Bass 
Martin, jeanes supervisor, introduced Dean 
Meyers and R. W. Campbell introduced Prince 
Jackson, Jr., College Alumni Secretary. Ver- 
non Butler gave the invocation. More than 
40 graduates attended the affair. 



Mrs. Ola B. Dingle 



Ret 



ires as 



Prexv 



Georgia Teacher of the 
Year for 1960-61 

Mrs. Nancy H. Walker, Special Education 
Teacher of the George W. J. DeRenne School 
has been given the honor of Georgia Teacher 
of the Year for 1960-61. The DeRenne faculty 
is very fortunate and proud to have this 
honor bestowed upon one of its members. 

Not only is Mrs. Walker one of the pioneers 
in the Mentally Retarded program, but she 
is one of the most outstanding Girl Scout 
Leaders in the country. She received the Com- 
munity Award for outstanding achievements 
as Director of the Negro Division of Girl 
Scouts of Savannah, Georgia, in 1955. She 
was co-leader of the first Brownie Troop or- 
ganized for Negroes in Chatham County. At 
present, she is the leader of Girl Scout Troops 
122 and 123 of DeRenne School. She is direc- 
tor of the Inter-School Council; the director 
of Music for the Savannah District of Parents 
and Teachers. She is Chairman of the School 
Health Council; co-chairman of the program 
committee for the C.C.T.A. She also served 
as consultant in the recent school survey for 
Henry and Spaulding counties. 

With Mrs. Walker's soft appealing person- 
ality, sense of moral and spiritual values, and 
a rich academic background, she has worked 
religiously and untiringly with youth for over 
twenty-five years. She holds a B.S. degree 
from Savannah State College; M.A. degree 



Mrs. Ola B. Dingle will retire in SeDtember 
as president of the Chatham County Teachers 
Association after a successful two year term 
of office. During her presidency, this group 
was host to the 42nd Annual Georgia Teachers 
and Education Convention held in Savannah 
recently. Mrs. Dingle will represent the or- 
ganization as a delegate to the National Edu- 
cation Convention which will convene in Los 
Angeles, California, June 26 -July 1, 1960. 

Mrs. Dingle was recently appointed prin- 
cipal of Monteith School and formerly taught 
at Pearl Lee Smith School. She is a volunteer 
trainer of Girl Scout Leaders and is a charter 
member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority as well as 
a past Basileus. She serves as Superintendent 
of the Sunday School at Second Arnold Bap- 
tist Church and is the wife of Rev. George 
Dingle and mother of one son, David. 



from Atlanta University. She has done ad- 
vanced work in school Administration and 
Special Education from Atlanta University and 
Race Relations and Intercultural Education 
from Fisk University. 

Mrs. Walker holds membership in the fol- 
lowing organizations: C.C.T.A., GTEA, NEA, 
American Teachers Association, YMCA, Di- 
rectors for Frank Callen Boys Club and Green- 
briar Children's Center. She is a member, and 
a past basileus of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, 
Inc. 

She is a faithful member of the First Afri- 
can Baptist Church where she serves as presi- 
dent of the Senior Choir; director of Music 
for Adult Sunday School Department; Chair- 
man of finance for church anniversary; mem- 
ber of the Junior League; and Director of 
Music for United Church Women's Organiza- 
tion. She is a member of the Chatham County 
Chapter of the Association for Retarded 
Children. 

Mrs. Walker is the wife of the late Frank 
B. Walker, former student of Savannah State 
College and former Assistant Manager of the 
North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. 




John W. Lawton, '38, President of the Georgia Teachers and 
Education Association, delivered the Annual Alumni Address at 
the June 4, 1960 Alumni Banquet. 



Leonard D. Law, National President, expresses gratitude for 
the program sponsored by the Savannah Chapter of the Savannah 
State College National Alumni Association honoring his life. 



9 




Wilton C. Scott Wins 
Newspaper Fund Fellowship 

By Rosa Lee Boles, '53 

Wilton C. Scott, director of Public Relations 
at Savannah State College since 1947, was 
granted a full summer study fellowship in 
journalism by the Newspaper Fund, Inc., at 
Columbia University, New York City. Scott 
was selected among the school press directors 
from all sections of the United States. He was 
recommended both by Dr. W. K. Payne, Presi- 
dent of Savannah State College, and others, 
including Dr. Joseph Murphy, Director, Co- 
lumbia Scholastic Press Association. The 
Newspaper Fund, Inc. is endowed by the Wall 
Street Journal. 

The Newspaper Fund awards fellowships to 
people engaged in school press relations em- 
phasizing publication-. 

In awarding the fellowship to Mr. Scott, the 
Newspaper Fund, Inc., states, "The Newspaper 
Fund appreciates your interest in journalism 



and is pleased to grant your request for a 
summer study Fellowship. It is our purpose 
that the grants be used for courses and train- 
ing in journalism. We are confident that the 
Fellowship will provide you with the inspira- 
tion to develop better school newspapers, to 
enhance the teaching of high school journal- 
ism and to guide more talented young people 
into newspaper careers." 

For the past several years, Wilton C. Scott 
directed the Savannah State College Press In- 
stitute and enlarged it to be a state and re- 
cently it has become a regional Press Institute 
and attracts elementary, high school, and col- 
legiate editors and advisors from numerous 
communities in the southeastern states. The 
Savannah Morning News and Press, Inc. has 
cooperated with the College by providing sou- 
venir programs and consultants for the Press 
Institute. 

Mr. Scott was named to Who's Who in 
American Education this year, and he has 
been cited by the 85th United States Congress 
and Board of Regents, University System of 
Georgia. He was the first Negro to receive 
the Columbia University Gold Medal Award 
in journalism. 

Having received his B.A. degree from Xavier 
University, he later earned his M.A. degree 
and a six-year professional certificate from 
New York University. 

Mr. Scott received the U. S. Civil Service 
Sustained Superior Accomplishment Award in 
July, 1946, as Employee Relations Officer at 
the Savannah Army Supply Depot. He won 
the USO Meritorious Service Award given by 
the National Catholic Community Services in 
1946, for services rendered to World War II 
servicemen and war workers. 

He is affiliated with many professional and 
civic organizations including American Asso- 
ciation of School Administrators, NEA, GTEA, 
American College Public Relations Associa- 
tion, American Association of Higher Educa- 
tion, district representative for the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, YMCA 
Board of Directors, St. Benedict Catholic 
Church, and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. 



Alumni Briefs 

Walter J. Leonard, '49, has opened a Gen- 
eral Real Estate Business at 886 Simpson 
Street, N.W., Atlanta, Georgia. Drop in and 
say hello to him on your next trip to Atlanta. 

Lillian M. Bodison, ultra brilliant Savannah 
State College mathematician, is now teaching 
mathematics at Fitzsimmons Junior High 
School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She 
had previously taught in Moultrie, Georgia. 

Laurine Williams, "56, is now coaching girls' 
basketball at her high school alma mater in 
Blackshear, Georgia. Her girls won the State 
"B" Championship. 

Miss E. A. Moon, '56, math instructor at 
Brooks County High School, Quitman, Geor- 
gia, will .attend New York University to study 
toward the Master's Degree in mathematics. 

Miss F. G. Manning of Valdosta has been 
awarded a $450 grant for summer school study 
because of her high score on the National 
Teachers Exam. This grant is for five sum- 
mers. 

* * * 

Mr. Isaiah Isom, '58, President of the Val- 
dosta Alumni Chapter, will attend Florida 
A. & M. University to continue study toward 
the Master's Degree in Industrial Education. 
Mr. Isom is shop instructor at Pinevale High 

School. 

* * * 

Miss Nettye A. Handy, '57, English teacher 
at Pinevale High School, Valdosta, will attend 
Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
where she will continue study toward the 
Master's Degree in English. 

* * * 

David Battle, LaVern Carter, Forest Hop- 
kins, and Eugenia Lamar are serving on the 
Faculty of Maggie Califf High School of 
Gray, Georgia. Benjamin Crawford is prin- 
cipal. 

Pearlie C. Lay, '40, is teaching in Carters- 
ville, Georgia. She was unable to attend her 
class reunion but sent her $5 alumni scholar- 
ship dues. 




Shown alwvc are Ernest Greene, Isaiah Isom, president of 
the Valdosta Chapter, and R. P. liinford. These three alumni 
drove 175 miles from Valdosta, Georgia, June, 4, 1960 to bring 
S200 to be used in the National Defense Loans at Savannah State. 



These three young ladies will lead Savannah State College 
Students next school year. Left to right : Yvonne McGlockton will 
serve as "Miss Savannah State" (she is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John McGlockton of the 1934 class I ; Eva Boscman will 
serve as the first female Student Council President in the 14 
years of history of the Council; and Eleanor Johnson will serve 
as Vice President of the Student Council. 



10 



Mrs. Ophelia Mclver, retired principal of 
Haven Home School in Savannah, is enjoying 
her retirement. She was among the first to 
pay her alumni dues of $10.50. 

Ida Ophelia Reeves, '49, is doing a won- 
derful joh on the faculty of Fort Valley State 
College. She is in the mathematics depart- 
ment. 

Joseph Burroughs. '59, is now teaching In- 
dustrial Education at Tompkins High School 
in Savannah. 

George Varnedoe, '59, is now teaching In- 
dustrial Education at Wayne County Training 
School in Jesup, Georgia. He also attended 
Atlanta University in 1959. 

Rena W. Varnedoe, '49. is teaching at Lib- 
erty County High School in Mcintosh, Georgia. 

Maggie L. Jones, '54, is teaching at Carver 
Elementary School in Douglas, Georgia. 

William J. Bryant, '22, is teaching at Dick- 
erson Training School in Vidalia, Georgia. 

Malsenia I. Armstrong, '56, is teaching at 
Carver Elementary School in Douglas, Geor- 
gia. She probably will receive her M.A. from 
Atlanta University this summer. 

James B. Williams, '41. is now employed as 
an Auto Mechanic in the Department of the 
Army in Plainfield, New Jersey. 

Dr. Clyde W. Hall, '48, is still overseas in 
Liberia, West Africa, where he serves as a 
trades and industries technician under a con- 
tract between the government (if Liberia, the 
United States Operations Mission to Liberia 
and Prairie View A. & M. College of Texas. 

John Camper, '47, is now teaching at Ven- 
tura School For Girls, Ventura. California. 
He visited the campus briefly in June. Mr. 
Camper attended U.C.L.A. in 1959. He has 
made Prince Jackson, Jr., Alumni Secretary. 
a definite promise that a chapter will be 
functioning in Los Angeles before July 4, 
1960. He also stated that the Los Angeles 
Chapter, when organized, will do more than 
its share in the Alumni Scholarship Drive. 

Maceo and Cherry W. Home both received 
the M.S. degree at the 1959 Commencement, 
Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana. The 
Homes were active at Savannah State in many 
phases of student life. 

Maceo is currently a principal in Lowndes 
County and Cherry is music consultant for 
the county. 




W. H. McBride, dy- 
namic President of the 
Savannah State College 
National Alumni Associ- 
ation and President of 
the Athens Chapter of 
the Savannah State Col- 
1 e g e National Alumni 
Association, was toast- 
master at the National 
Alumni Banquet. Under 
the leadership of Mc- 
Bride, the Athens Chap- 
ter has ballooned into one of the strongest 
in the State. 




James O. Thomas, '56. 
is now president of the 
Washington, D.C., Chap- 
ter and is doing a great 
job. He is employed as 
a Chemistry Patent 
Examiner in the U. S. 
Patent Office and is re- 
garded as one of State's 
most outstanding Chem- 
ist-Mathematician. 

The D. C. Chapter 
held its annual banquet 
and installation of officers on March 26, 1960. 
Mr. Harold Jones, principal, Children's Cen- 
ter, Laurel, Maryland, delivered the address. 

On April 26, 1960 the Chapter raffled off 
a Hi Fi set to raise money for the Annual 
Scholarship Drive. The Chapter also enter- 
tained Mr. William J. Holloway, former Dean 
of Men at Savannah State College during his 
visit in Washington to attend the Annual 
White House Conference. The Chapter is now 
making plans for its annual outing. 




Benjamin Crawford, 
'48. principal of Maggie 
Califf High School, Gray, 
Georgia, is doing a won- 
d e r f u 1 job in Jones 
County. Coprpleting his 
eighth year at the school, 
he has masterminded 
many improvements, in- 
cluding the building of a 
gymnasium. 

Recently he enter- 
tained Dr. W. K. Payne 
and Prince Jackson, Jr., College Alumni Sec- 
retary, in his beautiful home. Dr. Payne de- 
livered the Commencement address at the 1960 
graduation exercises. Crawford received the 
M.A. degree from Columbia in 1951. 



Mrs. Latherine Miller 
was selected Teacher of 
the Year for the Val- 
dosta city school system. 

She is teacher and sci- 
ence co-ordinator in the 
Lomax Jr. High School 
where she has been em- 
ployed for the past four 
years. 

Mrs. Miller is a gradu- 
ate of Savannah State 
College and is now work- 
ing toward the completion of her graduate 
work at Fort Valley State College. She is the 
mother of one son, Kenneth Miller, Jr. 




Become Active In 

Your Alumni Chapter 

Today 

Contribute to the 

Alumni Scholarship Fund 



Carlton H. Morse re- 
ceived the Ed.D. degree 
in 1959 from the Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma, Nor- 
man, Oklahoma. Dr. 
Morse is now employed 
at Fort Valley State Col- 
m ^* lege, Fort Valley,. Geor- 

■kjL *■■ 

MB Mr. Morse was born in 

Mvk Sparta, Georgia, and re- 
Mlk ceived his early educa- 
■BMMI^^^ML^fc tj on there. He graduated 
from Savannah State in 1946 with a B.S. de- 
gree in Business Administration. He received 
the M.Ed, in School Administration from At- 
lanta University in 1951 and studied further 
at Tuskegee and Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1955 and 1957 respectively. 

He has taught at Wayne County Training 
School. Jesup, Georgia, Liberty County Train- 
ing School, Hinesville, Georgia, and has 
served as principal of L. S. Ingraham High 
School in Sparta, Georgia. 

He is a member of St. Mark A.M.E. Church, 
Sparta, Georgia; Compass Lodge #160, Sparta, 
Georgia; Postmaster, Prince Hall; J. H. 
Walker Consistory #14, Macon, Georgia 
(32°) ; Phi Delta Kappa (served as secretary- 
treasurer of Alpha Alpha Chapter while at 
University of Oklahoma) ; Kappa Delta Pi; 
Association for Student Teachers; Georgia 
Teachers and Education Association. He is 
married to the former Miss Carrie E. Clayton, 
a graduate of Clark College and the father of 
two children (boy 7, girl 4). 



Our Cover 

The cover picture was taken by Bob 
Mobley immediately after John Lawton, 
'38, was installed as President of the 
Georgia Teachers and Education Asso- 
ciation. 

Flanked by his beautiful and viva- 
cious wife Anne, it is no wonder why 
he has reached the top. A Fort Valley 
graduate, she has pushed him as all 
great wives have in order to get her 
man to the top. 

Savannah State is proud of this son 
and grateful to this wonderful wife who 
helped to get him to the top. 



MAY ISSUE 



SO 



The Bulletin 



Iff 6 



Vol. 13 



No. 6 



Dr. W. K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson, Jr., '49 Editor 

Wilton C. Scott Adviser 

Rosa Lee Boles, '58 Associate Editor 

Lillie Allen Powell, '58 Associate Editor 

Haze Mungin Culpepper, '61 Student Assistant 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is published in 
October, December, February, March, April, and May 
by Savannah State College. Entered as second-class 
matter, December 16, 1947, at the Post Office at 
Savannah, Georgia, under ttie Act of August 24, 1912. 



11 



AckiMimlK|cw^ 



Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present 
evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound health, 
and interest in a specific course of study arc eligible to apply 
for admission to the several departments of the college. 

Formal Application Required 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal 
application and thereafter submit such credentials as may he 
needed to support the application. Admissions correspondence 
should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 

Savannah State College 

State College Branch 

Savannah, Georgia 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed directly 
from the applicant's former school to the Director of Admissions. 
The application form with instructions may be obtained by writing 
the Director of Admissions. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 
NOTE: Fees remitted hy mail should be sent by money order, 
cashier's check, or certified check payable to SAVANNAH 
STATE COLLEGE. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee.. $45.00 $135.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 8.00 24.00 

Student Group Insurance (see below) 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges— Day Student *$ 61.00 *$183.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 167.00 501.00 

Total Charges — Boarding 

Students *$228.00 * $684.00 



The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges are 
assessed where applicable. Please see "Explanation of Fees." All 
charges are subject to change at the end of each quarter. Normal 
cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00 per quarter. Stu- 
dents are required to secure all books, supplies and tools neces- 
sary for satisfactory completion of courses for winch they are 
enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
Students are required to meet their financial obligations promptly 
as condition of their remaining in college. Students granted 
scholarships or work-aid will be notified in writing and credit 
will be made to their accounts accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring with 
them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated on the Schedule 
of Fees. 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they maintain 
satisfactory scholastic averages. These work opportunities include 
such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, library work, waiting 
tables, washing dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and 
unskilled work in the several trades and in maintenance. 



Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to 
selected students who meet the required standards of scholastic 
merit, high character, general promise, and superior achievement 
in certain specific areas of the college program. 

Students interested in National Defense Loan Funds, should 
write Chairman of Student Personnel Services, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Ga. 




1/J/i 





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1960 - 



IIS; 



/+ 



f Homecoming Edition 







.V 



A FOREWORD 



PftS 




?■■* 



* 





We art? such stuff as dreams are made. on, 
and our little life is rounded with a sleep. 

— Shakespeare 



* 



Ours is a world of dreams — of ambitions, aspirations, fancier, hopes, suppositions. We dream 
that this 1960 Savannah State College Homecoming Celebration will be uncommonly meaningful 
to every one of us (alumni, students, members of the staff, and well-wishers) spiritually, morally, 
and intellectually, lie hope that, looking back years from now. we shall all entertain heartwarming 
memories of our experiences during this all important weekend. 

Members of the alumni, your alma mater has been especially ambitious as to this particular 
Homecoming. It has worked diligently to make you know and feel that you actually are a! home. 
We want you to feel that way, to act that way. We urge you to be evernundful that together we 
constitute the Savannah State College family, together we share our World of Dreams. 

Ours is a Jet-Age world of lightning-swift changes. Returning from your various cities across 
the state and the nation, you will find that Savannah State is directly in step, and on the march 
with the Jet Age. Looking over the campus, you will find major changes in the curriculum, the 
staff, etc. You will find that some neiv buildings are under consideration, that some new buildings 
are already completed, and that renovation is going on well-nigh everywhere. This, of course, may 
cause you to experience some inconvenience; we hope, not too much. We rest assured that you will 
remain ever mindful that, after all, ours is a World of Dreams. Hence, we simply must continually 
aspire for a growingly superior Savannah State College. 

Meet your former classmates and schoolmates; talk with students and staff members; learn 
what's going on here at S.S.C. Share experiences. Thus rejuvenate yourself and live again those 
almost-forgotten S.S.C. days that we should like to remember not to forget as the inevitably on- 
coming years insist upon reminding us that "we are such stuff as dreams are made on." 

We are proud to have you as our house guests. We count ourselves fortunate that you liave 
come back again. We are glad that you are here. Getting together periodically like this, observing 
this time-honored tradition of Homecoming, helps us all to realize the increasing necessity of 
striving unceasingly for an ever greater Savanna li Stale. Noticing the physical changes in those 
we meet after the passing of a few years, we realize that we, loo, are much farther advanced along 
the nay of life. Yes, suddenly we realize that "our little life is rounded with a sleep. ' 

So, let us remember S.S.C. meaningfully. Let us cooperate with our alma mater — contribut- 
ing lime, labor, and money Ion aid the achievement of its dreams. Let us never forget that an 
institution of learning is no greater than its alumni, for 

A house is built of bricks and stones, of sills and posts and piers. 

But a home is built of loving deeds that stand a thousand years. 

.1. Randolph Fisher 



OUR COVER 

Beautiful Yvonne McGlockton, "Miss Savannah State," is a senior majoring in English from Savannah, Georgia. 




» . »'". 



* 




w. 



noted President, Dr. W. K. Payne, with a dedicated 
Faculty, Alumni and Student Body. 



MESSAGE 



* 



Savannah State College is glad to observe Animal Homecoming each year. The greeting of alumni, former students, 
and interested friends is one of the highlights of I lie academic year. Since it comes in the Fall, it furnishes inspiration and 



drive to reach higher standards and new achievements. 



ind friends of long standing, we are conscious of two vital processes. 



As we greet our alumni, new acquainlanc< 
On the one hand, there is always something to sec; while on the other hand, there is something to feel. Each year friends 
and visitors returning to the College are able to see a number of additions to and improvements in the physical plant. The 
College is continuing to upgrade its physical facilities and to construct new facilities in the light of present day needs and 
programs. 

Evervone who experiences homecoming understands that there is something to feel. In most instances it is not possible 
to touch it with the body. This group of items is communicated through the academic atmosphere and tone of the institution. 
One discovers this as he moves among the students, faculty, staff, and members of the college community. This feeling is 
an index to the developments which are taking place in the teaching and learning activities developed in the institution. The 
recognition of rising academic standards provides the other side of the picture which one sees on the physical side. The 
historical view of Savannah State College, which observes its 70th Anniversarv this vear. indicates that the College has con- 
tinued to grow in strength and service to the youth of this state. It is desirable that at some time during the day of cele- 
bration, a moment of thought may be given to the things seen and felt. 

Along with greetings to the Savannah Slate College alumni, we extend greetings to our visitors from Morris College. 
The long record of fine relationship in college athletics with the faculty and student body of Morris College heightens our 
enjoyment of this occasion. The football teams representing the two colleges will furnish a contest which contributes toward 
the high aims and ideals of each institution. When the shot is fired for the end of the game, we wish to sav that the contest 
was a displav of the finest quality of sportsmanship. 



W. K. Payne 



President and Mrs. W. K. Payne chat with 
their daughter, Dr. Rosalvn Payne Epps, 
son-in-law. Dr. Charles H. Epps, Jr., and 
their grandsons, Charles H. Epps, III, and 
Kenneth Carter Epps. Absent is Dr. William 
K. Payne, II, a California physician, and 
his family. 




rv m 




Beautiful Yvonne McGlockton, "Miss Savannah State," is a senior majoring in English from Savannah, Georgia. 





Carolyn Campbell, senior, Savannah, is 

majoring in English. This very beautiful 

young lady is an attendant to "Miss 

Savannah State." 



••-• •» . ■ 



'•''; .'. <■• ■ ',\ 






Lovely Miss Gloria Byrd hails from 
Hogansville, Georgia. She is an attend- 
ant to "Miss Savannah State" and a 
senior majoring in Social Science. 




"Miss Savannah State" and attendants: Gloria Byrd, senior, Hogansville; Yvonne McGlockton, "Miss Savannah State," 
senior, Savannah; and Carolyn Campbell, senior, Savannah. 



* 



The breath? of kissing 'night* and; day' • .. 

; . Were mingled' 'in the * eastern* heaven;-- 
'Throbbin*-' with . unheard ■melody,, '■'■;;. . . ■' 

'Shook Lyra' all- its star-chord se^en , :/ t 
* "... When dusk shrunk- ctflcl, and light trbcl sky. 
■•' "And tlawn's grey eyes' nvere. tfoilbled 2?re\ :. 
And .souls w.ent palely ,mj .•ihe*--sfc.\ . 

And fn'ihe to/Lucide \, .-'/ . V 

There /was. ho change 'in hep -sweet e\ e% . '' ' .. '. 
■-,..■• SinCe last Jl -sa-vv 'those, ..sweet. eye's shine; 
■ There .was no change in h^i-d.eep heart ;"■'•■ 

Since las't 'that deep heart knocked at mine. 
. '•'• Her oyes w£re< clear- her-'eyes were Hopes, • 

Wherein diet *y§r come -and' go 
The Sparkle "of the •founta^h-.clrojjs 

From 'her -sweet soul "below. 



The chambers 'in the house of dreams 
Are fed \vith so divine an air, ' 



That_ Time's hpar^ wings grow -young, therein, 
. And. they who walk there are most fair. 
I joyed for me, I joyed for her, 
+ . • Who with the past meet girt about ' 
Where 'our last tryst still warms the air, 
Nor -can her eyes go out. 

The Savannah State College Bulletin 

President Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief . .. Wilton C. Scott 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Editorial Assistants Rosa Lee Boles, '58, 

Lillie A. Powell, 58, Theodore Clark, '64 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Alumni Editor Prince Jackson, Jr. 

Volume 14 October 1960 Number 1 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in 

October, December, February, March, April, and May by 

Savannah State College. Second Class mail privileges authorized 
at Savannah, Georgia. 





©ream $eblarp 

Tf there were dreams to sell. 

What would you buy? 
Some cost a passing bell: 

Some a light sigh. 
That shakes from Life's fresh crown 
Only a rose-leaf down, 
If there were dreams to sell 
Merry and sad to tell, 
And the crier rang the bell. 

What would you buy? 



A cottage lone and still 

With bowers nigh, 
Shadowy, my woes to still, 

Until I die. 
Such pearl from Life's fresh crown 
Fain would I shake me down. 
Were dreams to have at will 
This would best heal my ill- 

This would I buy- 



But there were dreams to sel 
111 didst thous buy; 

Life is a dream, they tell, 
Walking to die. 

Dreaming a dream to prize. 

Is wishing ghosts to rise; 

And if I had the spell 

To call the buried well, 
Which one would I? 



If there are ghosts to raise, 

What shall I call, 
Out of hell's murky haze 

Heaven's blue pall? 
Raise my loved long-lost boy. 
To lead me to his joy. 
There are no ghosts to raise 
Out of death lead no ways; 

Vain is the call. 

Knowst thou not ghosts to sue. 

No love thou hast. 
\he lie. as I will do. 

And breathe tin dasl 
So out of Life's fresh crov 
Fall like a rose-leaf down. 
Thus arc the ghosts to woo: 
Thus ace all il reams made true, 

Ever to last! 

— Thomas l.ovdl Reddoes 





"Miss Western Culture," a charm- 
ing young lady selected by her 
classmates to represent the classes 
in Western Culture. 



"Miss Delta Sigma Theta," beauti- 
ful Carolyn Vinson, Social Science 
major, Savannah. 






"Miss Zeta Phi Beta," cute and 

talented Juanita Moon, senior, 

Savannah. 



/ 



'Miss Business," Bertha Kornegay, 
senior, Hazlchurst, Georgia. 






'Miss SNEA" and attendants are Rosa Lee James, Isabella Chance, 
"Miss SNEA" and Liola Trobridge. 



"Miss Camilla Hubert Hall" and attendants are Evelyn 



•'Miss Sphinx" and attendants: Jereline Nunnelv. sophomore, "" ss ^«*"«"* nuueri nan ana aiienaants are Evelyn 

Statesboro; Deloris Clark, "Miss Sphinx," sophomore, Sa- It 122 *"]? 1 ^ f «shman, Brunswick; "Miss CHH," Barbara 

vannah; and Lillian Cohen, sophomore, Savannah. Kendell, freshman; and Jacqueline Rynes, freshman, Val- 

dosta, Georgia. 




"Miss Omega" and attendants are three lovely seniors: 
Drucilla Moore, senior, Home Economics major, Savannah; 
Elise Bryant, "Miss Omega," senior, Business Administration 
major, Savannah; and Margaret Dawson, senior, Physical 
Education major, Pelem, Georgia. 




"Miss Kappa Alpha Psi" and attendants are beautiful Lou- 
rinne Brown, freshman, Valdosta; Emily "Lovely" Snype, 
"Miss Kappa," sophomore, elementary education and cute 
Ira Snelson, sophomore, Marietta, Business Education major. 




r 

"Miss Delta Sigma Theta" and attendants: Carolyn Collier, 
junior, Business major, Vienna; Carolyn "Cute" Vinson, 
"Miss Delta," junior, Social Science major, Savannah; and 
Louise Lamar, junior, English major, Talbotton, Georgia. 




"Miss Alpha Phi Alpha" and attendants are lovely Virginia 
Mercer, senior, Metter, Business Education major; Annette 
Kennedy, "Miss Alpha," junior, Savannah; and Rose Single- 
ton, senior, Business Administration major, Savannah. 




These lovely young ladies are "Miss Alpha Kappa Alpha" 
and attendants: Nellie Shellman, senior, Elementary Educa- 
tion major, Mcintosh, Georgia; Juanita Quinn, junior, So- 
cial Science major, Savannah, "Miss Alpha Kappa Alpha," 
and Rose Baker, junior, Social Science major, Savannah. 






... *: 



ic 







«f. 




mm*!* 






©•"l 










-*__•_. • • 



The 1960 Savannah State College Tigers football squad 
picture showing Head Coach Richard Washington in the 
upper left hand corner and Assistant Coaches George Miller 
and Marion D. Mendenhall in the upper right hand corner. 






1960 - 61 



Athletic Director Theodore Wright checks his books 
coming events. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROSTER 



Name 



No. 



Position 



Classification Height 



Weight 



High School 



Hometown 



Anderson, Richard 30 Halfback Sophomore 

Beech, James 35 Halfback Freshman .... 



Bell, Eddie 

Bowens, James C. 
Brown, Louis 
Carthon, James 
Christian, Willie ... 
Carter, Fred 



70 
61 
77 
69 



Tackle 
Guard 
Tackle 
Guard 



Senior 

Senior 

Sophomore 
Sophomore 



.2 1 Halfback Freshman 

80 End Freshman 



Cleveland, Harold - 24 Halfback Freshman 

Cummings, Duke - 66 Guard Freshman 

Davis, Tommy 23 Halfback Freshman 

Davis, William 60 Guard Freshman 

Dunbar, Bobby 11 . Quarterback Freshman 



Edwards, John 
Gaines, Charles 
Gordan, John 
Hollis, Minnis 
Hunter, William 
Johnson, George 

Leonard, Robert 
Lockett, Bobby 
Major, Leroy 



McGraw, Elijah 
McHellen, Johnny 
Mcintosh, Wendell 
Nelson, Dennis 
Oliver, David 

Robbins, William 
Roberts, Calvin 
Saunders, Henry 
Sims, George 
Spann, Benjamin 
Strong, John 
Scott, Lockland 

Tompkins, Frank 
Thomas, Therman 
Walker, Floyd 
Wilcher, Gene 
Williams, Alphonzo 
Wilson, John 



41 
72 
...64. 
84 
65 
67 

26 
75 
20 

85 
74 
76 
12 
50 

86 
55 
82 
42 
51 
33 
81 

22 
63 
73 
62 
71 
43 



Fullback 

Tackle 

Guard 

End 

Guard 

Guard 



Freshman 

Freshman 

Junior 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 



Fullback Freshman 

End Freshman 

Halfback Freshman 

End Junior 

Tackle Freshman 

Tackle Sophomore 

Quarterback Freshman 

Center Freshman 

End Sophomore 

Center Sophomore 

End Junior 

Fullback Freshman 

Center Freshman 

Halfback Senior 

End Freshman 

Halfback Freshman 

Guard Freshman 

Tackle Sophomore 

Guard Freshman 

Tackle Freshman 

Fullback Freshman 



7" 156 Hungerford High Valdosta 

(Winter Park, Fla.) 
1 1 " 177 Wittemore High Macon 

(Conway, S. C.) 

llvV' 189 Ballard-Hudson Macon 

9" 196 Monroe High Albany 

1" 240 Beach High javannah 

11" 180 Drake High Thomaston 

IOV2" 175 Washington High Quitman 

1" 185 Wellswille High East Point 

(Wellswille, Ohio) 

10" 170 South Fulton ..East Point 

9'/ 2 " 205 Burke High Waycross 

(Charleston, S. C.) 

11" 168 Spencer High Columbus 

9" 182 Tompkins High Savannah 

7" 170 Douglas Anderson Valdosta 

(Jacksonville, Fla.) 

200 Center High Waycross 

195 Monroe High Albany 

9" 160 . Tompkins High i'avannah 

1" 187 Washington High Quitman 

8" 175 Pinevale High Valdosta 

10 l A" ....... 223 Jones High. .... Valdosta 

(Orlando, Fla.) 
11" 180 Spencer High Columbus 

186 Ballard-Hudson Macon 

183 Burke High Quitman 

(Charleston, S. C.) 
4" 190 Beach High Savannah 



2" 230 

3'A" 204 

ll'/i" 165 

2" 200 



'A" 180 

10" 178 

2" 190 

1" 217 

1" 215 Ballard-Hudson 

11" 180 Monroe High 



Pinevale High Valdosta 

Ballard-Hudson Macon 

Ballard-Hudson Macon 

Hungerford High Waycross 

(Winter Park, Fla.) 

Tompkins High Savannah 

Tompkins High Savannah 

Tompkins High Savannah 

Wasnington High Quitman 

Macon 
Albany 



5" 210 Douqlas Anderson 
(Jacksonville, Fla ) 

7" 153 Spencer High 

ll'A" 180 Tompkins High 

l'A" 260 Beach High 

184 Ballard-Hudson 

5" 198 Pinevale High 



Valdosta 

Columbus 

Savannah 

Savannah 

Macon 

Valdosta 



1" 



201 



Pinevale High Valdosta 



Athletic Director — Theodore Wright, Sr., Head Coach — Richard K. Washington,- 
are Marion D. Mendenhall, George Miller and Albert Frazier. 



Cha 



Athletic Committee — Elmer J. Dean. Assistant Coaches 



»• 




V 




Big, Bad, Bruising, Bashful — The body crushers, George Johnson and Dick Cummings. 











n 



The Columbus Jets, Tommy Davis and Frank Tompkins. 




The Tigers starting backfield, John "Yam" 

Strong, John "Bucking Goat" Wilson, and Frank 

"Runt" Tompkins run through hand-off drills 

with quarterback Dennis Nelson. 







%4 

* '*?* 3 



if* i 







Six Maconites, Bobby Lockett, Wendell Mcintosh, Benjamin Spann, Gene Wilcher, Eddie Bell, and behind the line, 
Dennis Nelson. 




freS hma n 



center 



■^WSPl^ga 







P ° Un *s of TNT 




: 

^ y ? • 



^— 



U 



V 



Quarterbacks Dennis Nelson and Bobby Dunbar 

shake hands as they agree on the game tactics 

of the season. 




• 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 




vs. 






MORRIS COLLEGE - 


• SUMTER, S. 


1 


October 15, 1960 


- - - 2 P. M. 





Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics 



Dr. Elmer J. Dean. Chairman 
Emanuel A. Bertram! 
Miss Albertha Boston 
Miss Mary Ella Clark 
C. Vernon Clav 



Miss Madeline Harrison 
Dr. Raymond \V. ITopson 
Prince Jackson. Jr. 
B. J. James 
Frank Tharpe 



Richard Washington 
Theodore A. Wright 
James Dixon 
Elijah McGrau 



Committee on Homecoming Activities 



Frank Tharpe. Chairman 
Mrs. Geraldine Abernathv 
Felix Alexis 
Mrs. Martha Avery 
Eddie Bivins 
Leroy Brown 
Alflorence Cheatham 
Mrs. Ella Fisher 
Samuel Gill 



Miss Doris 1 farris 
Miss Luella Hawkins 
Prince Jackson. Jr. 
Mrs. Louise Owens 
Charles Philson 
Wilton C. Scott 
Ernest Brun>on 
Eddie Bryant 
Otis Cox 



Shelton Daniel 
Willie Goldwire 
Roosevelt Harris 
Miss Emma S. McCrory 
Miss Dorothy Monroe 
Miss Hazel Mungin 
Jerome Smith 
James Tribble 
Willie Wilkerson 



I"' 




I . 



. V 



< Ik"- 



■' r 



AfitiMMK 



+ 



.'■'/ 



'•■'•*. 



* •. 



* 






Savannah State College Alumni are Chatham County Principals. Among these, left to 
right, are Malcolm Thomas, principal, East Broad Street School; James Luten, principal, 
Tompkins High School, and Norman Elmore, principal, Florance Street School. 



Mrs. Sadie D. Steele, "1959 
Georgia Teacher of the 
Year," congratulates Mrs. 
Nancy H. Walker upon be- 
ing selected "1960 Georgia 
Teacher of the Year" at the 
National Alumni Banquet. 
Also in the picture are Dr. 
and Mrs. W. K. Payne and 
W. H. McBride, newly elect- 
ed National Alumni Presi- 
dent. 




Mr. and Mrs. John Law, Sr., 
are passing on to the Class 
of 1960 some of the fine 
ideas of life that have 
given them an enviable life 
among all who know them. 
Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne 
can be seen. John Lawton, 
president of Georgia Teach- 
ers and Education Associ- 
ation on extreme left. 



A WORLD OF DREAMS 

WHAT CAN I DO? 



Making our World of Dreams a reality requires all of us (alumni, 
students, staff, well-wishers) to do the very best we can with whatever 
resources we have at our disposal. Some can do one thing; some can 
do another. But each one of us can do something. 

Limitations as to time and space prohibit an elaboration upon 
many things that we can do. Following are a few that deserve pains- 
taking consideration: 

1. We can contribute books to the library thus strengthening the 
entire college. 

2. We can direct worthy students to the College. 

3. We can help worthy students remain at the College. ( Many of 
us would be shocked to know how many excellent students who 
should be in College are not able to attend, and how many who 
do enter College are compelled to drop out because of in- 
sufficient funds. I 

4. We can support all S.S.C. projects, on and off-campus. 

5. We can contribute regularly and substantially to the Savannah 
State College Scholarship Fund. 

6. We can maintain a kindly attitude toward S.S.C, realizing that 
an institution of learning is no greater than its products. 

7. We (each of us) can resolve that 

I am only one, 
But I am one. 

I cannot do everything. 
But, I can do something. 

What I can do, I ought to do, 
And what I ought to do, 
By the grace of God, 
I will do. 

Thus, every one of us (alumni, students, members of the faculty, 
well-wishers, et al.) can contribute toward making Savannah State 
College's World of Dreams a heartwarming and lifegiving accomplish- 
ment. 

J. Randolph Fisher 



t 




. t 



m 



gltoM 



• .•Once^a-xlream crid weave", a srfcide 
O'-er. my a«gej"-guarded*' bed> < 
Thatan/enirji£$ lost it's way- •. : ./ 
"Where, on grass jftejmougbt" I lay. • 

•Troubled, wifdefced, a'rid .'forlorn. 
Dark," benighted, HfavelVorn. .' 

• Over many a tangled, spray, • ' 

All hea"rt:orokey 'I heajfd hoc say: 
k ••'•■. ■.''■ ' : 'y ■:"■- • •• '*'.*":•'■'"..■ J ;• 

"Oh, *my.ehildren!''-D.o',tKey. pry, , 
Do thgy* hear* then - , father' sigh ? • 
Now they look\ab road 't'6 . see;' ; .- . 
Now return and. weep for " ra.e.'' 'V 

• • > ■•■■ .'* ■' *■ ■,"/*•■' • 
Pitying, I dropped a t£ax;'- . ' 

But I day 'a : glow-worn ^near^ ' '. '■,'/.■ *. •" 

Who "replied. •/'WhaS ^vailing! weighr . \ 

Calls -the watchman of the night?' ,*■,' '_.-• 

• :•; - ; V- : '^•^;;.;::;^.-,..-\ 

*T».am g^t todight thegro'uQ^r '* ' 

While, the beetle .goes hi's v round;.; ;'•*.'•• 
[: " Pbllo*w' now the beetle's" hurrj;- ' <•'-: '. -:/•'■ t 
Little wanderer,' hie tneeT horneT'*^ • ■*''■ 

V'-..-- ;'>"■':*•"'-' '.'■"' .. W-illiarri J&afce \ . ." 



CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 

■ . ■■■*■■' 



Nellie Shellman, senior, Savannah State College, 
uses half-million-dollar Library. 



These Savannah State College stu- 
dents get together for a friendly 
chat. 



* 





Student Council president, versatile Eva Bose- 
man, assists with Freshman Orientation. 






Scene from Chemistry Class in the new Million Dollar 
Technical Center. 



A scene from Savannah State College Summer School 
Workshop. 



■f': ; 




Installation of Dormitory Council officers: Miss Marcella Rhodriquez, Miss 
Emma Sue McCrory, Miss Loreese Davis, and Mrs. L. A. Lester. 



I 



a 









A scene from Savannah State College Summer School Workshop. 




A scene from Savannah State College Summer School Workshop. 



M\)t #peamer 

,* ■ V' • . '■ ■- " •' - 
thou who giving helm and sword, 

Gav'st, i66 ? -,ine rioting.. rain, 
Ana 1 st&rity dark's 'all'tender dews 

To blunt awd 'stain.'" 

. ■'■ .■ . '- •'■/•• 

of .the battle I am .sped, "yT 
inharme'd,':' y.ef stricken sore; 
A Mvingj £h,ape airjid. r - whispering 
shades •;• . .',-.''' 
. On Lethe ,: s '.shote. ' -, 
» '• ' r ••>■'•. .'■.■ 

No trophy in my hands • I -bring, 
To this sad, sighing strea'm., • 

The neighing and jhe tramps' and 
cries .'•';'. | '' ' • 

Weice but a dream. • • .■'.■•• \ 

Traitor to life, : of ljfe: betrayed: 
"0, of thy -mercy deep*. \- . 

A dream niy all, -the' ail. I ask 

"Is sleep. • • . '■■■■ ' l . ■• - ' 
• - ■ - ' ■-, 
• • • .--Waltetffie La Mare \. 



* 



\ «r 




• 



?;* 



+ 










ki*k«n , 



SAVANNAH STATE C 



ABOUT OUR COVER 

(Seated left to right) Mrs. J. S. 
Spikes, Miss Annie A. Gay, and 
Mrs. Lucille Lemon. (Standing 
left to right) Mr. E. S. Spikes, 
Mrs. Anna S. Johnson, Miss Mable 
Cook, Mrs. Thelma Roundtree and 
Mr. Lewis Banks. 

The Griffin Chapter is the 
youngest among the twenty chap- 
ters of th e National Alumni Asso- 
ciation but has already exhibited 
a "spirit" that should make it one 
of the strongest in the alumni 
structure. 

The members are meeting regu- 
larly and one of the first official 
actions of the chapter was to pay 
their scholarship contributions for 
the year. They have already set 
up their constitution and everyone 
regularly attends the meetings on 
the fourth Sunday of each month. 

Plans are underway to sponsor 
several affairs for next year and a 
study is being made to find ways 
to make Savannah State more wide- 
ly known in that area. Mr. Lewis 
Banks, President of the Chapter, 
is to be congratulated and com- 
mended for the tremendous job he 
has done in just four short months. 
If graduates in the non-chapter 
areas would do half as much as 
the Griffin group, there would be 
very few alumni problems. 



MAY ISSUE 



7U 



Ski 



Vol. 14 No. 6 

Dr. W. K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson, Jr., '49 Editor 

Wilton C. Scott Advisor 

Rosa Lee Boles, '58-Asso ciate Editor 

Lillie Allen Powell, '58 Associate 

Editor 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is 
published in October, December, Febru- 
ary, March, April, and May by Savannah 
State College. Entered as second-class 
matter, December 16, 1947, at the Post 
Office at Savannah, Georgia, under the 
Act of August 24, 1912. 




The 1961 Tiger was dedicated to our "First Lady", Mrs. Mattie B. Payne at 
a special chapel program held in her honor May 16. This recognition came to 
Mrs. Payne as a result of her untiring and diligent efforts to build "finer woman- 
hood" among young women. 

In the top picture, Alphonso Golden, Editor-in-Chief of the 1961 Tiger pre- 
sents the first copy to Mrs. Payne. In the bottom picture, (left to right) Prince 
Jackson, Jr., Mis. Payne, Dr. W. K. Payne and William Golden inspectthe 1961 
Tiger. 

Directory of National Alumni Officers 



W. H. McBride, '49, President 
284 Plaza 
Athens, Georgia 
Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, 
Vice President 
Tattnall County High & 

Industrial School 
Reidsville, Georgia 
Mrs. Marie B. Martin, '46, 
Recording Secretary 
William James High School 
Statesboro, Georgia 



Mrs. Esther S. Bryant, '59, 
Corresponding Secretary 

1017 West 37th Street 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Mitchell, '57, Treasurer 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson, Jr., '49, Reporter 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, '17, Chaplain 

604 Waters Ave., Savannah, Ga. 



' ! I 





Norman B. Elmore (left) receives 
plaque and congratulations from 
James E. Luten, President of the 
Savannah Chapter of the Savannah 
State College National Alumni 
Association. 




Miss Matella Maree, 1936 Grad- 
uate of the College, was recently 
named "Georgia Teacher of the 
Year". She follows Mrs. Nancy 
H. Walker, who followed Mrs. Sadie 
Davis Steele, and thus became the 
third alumna in three consecutive 
years to be named the top teacher 
in the state. No other college can 
claim this distinction. 



Miss Metella W. Maree, teacher at 
John W. Hubert Elementary School, 
was named "Teacher of the State 
of Georgia" at the annual banquet. 
Teachers from al I over the state 
were feted by the Georgia Chamber 
of Commerce and the Georgia Tea- 
chers and Education Association 
at Thomas Healthe Slater School. 

Mrs. Sadie D. Steele, teacher of 
Johnson Elementary School, was 
"Teacher of the Year" for the 
term 1959-60. Mrs. Nancy Walker, 
Special Education Teacher at 
George W. J. DeRenne Elementary 
School is current "Teacher of the 
Year". 

Miss Maree, who is a graduate of 
Savannah State College, will be 
doing further study this summer at 



CHATHAM COUNTY TEACHERS OF THE YEAR 

(Seated left to right) Marguerite Wright, Cornelia Walker, Jestine Moran, 
Jaunita Davis, Matilda Rivers, Matella Maree (Georgia Teacher of the 
"Year Elect), and Wilsie Calfee. (Standing left to right) Benjamin Dens- 
er, Henton Thomas, Roger Jones, Nancy Walker (Georgia Teacher of 
tfte Year), Robert Washington, Georgia Gordon, Walter Simmons and 
Lester Johnson. 




"THIS IS YOUR LIFE" FAMILY 

The Norman B. Elmores pose for a family picture after Mr. Elmore re- 
ceived the "This is your Life" plaque from the Savannah Chapter. Mr. 
Elmore was honored for the many outstanding contributions he has made 
to his Alma Mater and the Community of Savannah. 



Columbia University where she re- 
ceived her Master's Degree. She 
is a product of Savannah Public 
Schools and Spelman Sr. High. 
She earned an A. B. Degree from 
Columbia University. She has 
done advanced work at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California. She 
has done advanced work at the 
University of Chicago and Colum- 
bia University also. 
She is widely known for her dyna- 
mic leadership in school, civic 
and community activities. Recog- 
nition has been given her service 
by numberlesscertificates, awards 
and other honors. 

A few of her affiliations are as 
follows: Carnegie Library Board 
of Directors, Savannah Mental 
Health Board, Charter Member, 



Savannah Youth Museum, Vice- 
President of Frank Callen Boy's 
Club Board of Directors, Troop 
Consultant - Mamie George Wil- 
liams District, Charter Member - 
Chatham County School Employers 
Credit Union, and West Broad 
Y.M.C. A., and Board of Manage- 
ment - Chairman U. S. 0. Commit- 
tee. 

She holds active membership in 
organizations as follows: N.E.A., 
A.T.A., G.T.E.A., C.C.T.A., PTA, 
Y.W.C.A., U.C.C., A.C.E.I. and 
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. 

Miss Maree is an ardent member of 
St. Philip A.M. E. Church where 
she serves on the Board of Trus- 
tees and as President of the John 
S. Bryan Guild. 





Shown in the picture above is the 1901 class, the second co-ed class to graduate and the oldest of the 
l's. (First row, right to left) Mrs. Hettie L. Roston Chattres, Miss J. Pearl Butler, Mrs. Hatti e Gerri- 
deau Smith and Miss Rebecca Sengstacke. (Second row, right to left) Mr. Joseph Ford, Mrs. Essie 
Wright Thompson (daughter of President R. R. Wright), Mrs. R. R. Holmes, Mr. Thomas Baker, Mrs. 
Rhina A. Albany Miller, Mr. James M. Washington. (Third row, right to left) Prof. N. D. Young (tea- 
cher-trainer), Mrs. Mamie V. Edwards Shoots, Mr. Theodore B- Gordon, Mrs. Ida Magrante LaShay, Miss 
Lula Smith, Mr. Wl A. Richie, Mrs. Jessie Bradley Holmes. (Not on picture is Mrs. Sarah Brown.) Mr. 
Theodore Gordon (retired postal clerk of Washington, D. C), Miss Rebecca Sengstacke (retired Chatham 
County teacher, now residing in Chicago), Miss Josie Pearl Butler Morris and Miss Lula Smith (retired 
Chatham County teacher) are the only living members of the class. 




Fictured to the left is Miss Lula Smith, '01, one of four living 
members of the 1901 class. Miss Smith has worked untiringly 
as an alumna of the College for sixty years. She is still active 
in the meetings and has not missed showing up on the fourth 
Sunday for the Savannah Chapter meeting in many years. If 
love for the institution was ever shown, she has shown it. Pre- 
sently serving as Treasurer of the Chapter, she keeps the books 
in perfect order. Whenever someone is sick or has received an 
honor, she never forgets to send the appropriate message for the 
Chapter. As a result of her unselfish services to the College, 
she has gained the love and respect of all who have had the priv- 
ilege of being in her presence. It has often been said that if 
one-fourth of the alumni were doing as much as Miss Smith, the 
College would have no kind of problem in alumni affairs. 



As in any growing organization, the Alumni Association depends solely upon the graduating classes to 
furnish the future leadership. The Class of 1961 is indeed fortunate to have among its members, offi- 
cers and leaders of the kind that are pictured on this page. They have not only displayed outstanding 
leadership ability but are anxious to join the ranks of the alumni and work for the building of a greater 
Savannah State. 





Yvonne McGlockton 

"Miss Savannah State College" 

Associate Editor-in-Chief, The Tiger's Roar 



Virginia Mercer 
Co-Editor-in-Chief, 1961 Tiger ; Ba- 
sileus, Gamma Upsilon Chapter, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. 




I 





Eva C. Boseman 
President of Savannah State College 
Student Council. (The first female 
president in the 14 years histc- of 
the Council.) 



Percy Byrd 
President of Senior Class 



Alphonso McLean 
Treasurer of Senior Class; Editor-in- 
Chief, Tiger's Roar; Vice-President, 
Delta Eta Chapter, Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity . 









Eleanor Johnson 
Vice-President of Savannah State 
College Student Council. 



Bertha Komegay 
Secretary of Senior Class; Associate 
Editor-in-Chief, 1961 Tiger. 



Cynthia R. Baker 
State President, Student National 
Education Association. 




fl 



\ --- 





Lee Ernest Dewberry 
President of the Senior Cla ss; Past 
Basileus, Alpha Gamma Chapter, 
Omega Psi Ph< Fraternity. 



William Porn^ey 
Chaplain of Senior'Class; President, 
Delta Eta Chapter, Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity. 



William Golden 
Co-Editor-in-Chief, 1961 Tiger 




The April, 1961 Georgi 
Meeting in Atlanta broug 
together. As can be se 
served in many respects 
old days". Perhaps you 
in one or more of the pictu 




and Education Association 
annah State College Alumni 
rious pictures, the meeting 
igether" to recall the "good 
urself or someone you know 



. ER OF SAVANNAH 
SiATE COLLEGE ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 

The Athens Chapter of SSC Alumni 
Association, with an eye cast to- 
wards the immediate future and the 
new frontier, is planning another first 
for alumni chapters in the North 
Georgia area. Preliminary plans are 
now being made to bring to Athens 
and North Georgia a scholarship 
benefit basketball game featuring 
the champions of S.E.A.C. and Dis- 
trict 6 N.A.I. A., Savannah State Col- 
lege Tigers and another worthy op- 
ponent. 

The Chapter held a limited number 
of meetings during the 1960-61 school 
year. All of these meetings, how- 

ever, were devoted to the develop- 
ments of new methods to strengthen 
the organization and increase its 
sphere of influence. 

Many graduates of Savannah State 
College, now living in the Athens 
area, are not members of the Savan-' 
nah State College Alumni Association 
nor do they participate in any manner 
in alumni affairs. The enrollment of 
the participation of these individ- 
uals in alumni affairs is sMll the 
number one problem confronting the 
Athens Chapter. 




During 1960-61, members of the Ath- 
ens Chapter have remained active. 
Hattie Marie Patman , Miss Savannah 
State Alumni Queen from the Athens 
Chapter, along with Ellie Gay, local 
chapter member, served as represen- 
tatives of SSC at the Annual Career 
Day Program held at Athens High and 
Industrial School. Emma L. Brown- 
ing, Treasurer of the Athens Chapter, 
was elected "Teacher of the Year" 
for Oconee County. Homer T. Ed- 
wards, Principal of Athens High and 
Industrial School attended the meet- 
ing of National Association of Secon- 
dary School Principals held in De- 
troit, Michigan. Rowena B. McCree, 
Counselor at the Athens High and In- 
dustrial School, attended the American 
Personnel and Guidance Association 
Meeting in Denver, Colorado. Miss 
McCree is also the writer of a thought 
provoking article on "Departmental- 



ization in the Elementary School," 
published in the Atlanta Constitution. 
Willie E. McBride served as a di- 
vision leader in the Annual Member- 
ship Drive of the Samuel F. Harris 
Y.M.C.A., Athens, and as chairman 
for Men's Day at Ebenezer Baptist 
Church. Mr. McBride. was elected 
permanent chairman of the residental 
division of the American Cancer Fund 
Drive for Athens and Clarke County, 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
Ebenezer Baptist Church, and Chair- 
man of Leadership Training for the 
Northeast Georgia Division of Boy 
Scouts of America. Homer T. Ed- 
wards, Ellie Gay, Frances McBride, 
Georgia Browning and Willie E. Mc 
Bride served on numerous occasions 
as speakers for church, civic, social 
and professional organizations. 

BULLOCH COUNTY CHAPTER 
NEWS 

By Mrs. Mary J. Jackson 

The Chapter holds monthly meetings 
each Tuesday after the second Sun- 
day. 



mjmm 




On February 12, 1961, the Senior 
Class of William James High School 
was entertained along with the par- 
ents of students attending Savannah 
State. Mr. Wilton C. Scott made the 
principal address at this affair which 
is the annual project of the Chapter. 

The chapter is now working on a 
scrapbook. Miss Frances Tremble, 
Mrs. Ruby Reeves and Mrs. Mary 
Jackson are members of this commit- 
tee. 

At each meeting, Mrs. Geraldine 
Campbell is responsible for preparing 
a program. Various members alter- 
nate as hosts or hostesses. 

The officers of the Chapter are: Mrs. 
Etheleen Talbert, President; Mrs. 
Mabel Garbett, Vice-President; Mrs 
Mary J. Jackson, Secretary; Mrs. 
Alma Kent, Assistant Secretary; and 
Rev. W. D. Kent, Chaplain. 

Mrs. Odessa Hal I and the committee 
on membership are working ha/d to 
make a good financial report. 




Arthur Dwight (left) has been appoin- 
ted Principal of Sol C. Johnson High 
and Elementary School. He is a for- 
mer basketball and football coach at 
his Alma Mater. 

In addition to his B. S. Degree at Sa- 
vannah State, he earned the M. A. 
Degree at the University of Minne- 
sota. Prior to his nomination, he 
was Principal of Beach Junior High 
School in Savannah. 

Wade M. Simmons (right), is Assis- 
tant Principal under Dwight and has 
been named to become Principal of 
Paulsen Elementary School in August. 
In addition to his B. S. Degree from 
Savannah State, he earned the M. A. 
at Columbia University. 




Isiah Mclver (above), 1957 outstand- 
ing graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege, will receive the Master Degree 
from Boston State College in Educa- 
tion and History this summer. While 
at State, Mclver, who served as Edi- 
tor-in-Chief of The Tiger's Roar, 
made many outstanding contributions 
to student life and his editorials were 
rated as some of the best among stu- 
dent editors. After graduation, he 
worked in Atlanta with The Atlanta 
Daily World for two years before go- 
ing to Boston to study. 

He was named "Savannah State Col- 
lege Man of the Year" in 1957 along 
with winning many other recognitions. 
He was a member of Delta Eta Chap- 
ter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Inc. and is presently affiliated with 
graduate chapter in Boston. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CHAPTER 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The D. C. Chapter of the Savannah 
State College Alumn i Association 
held its Annual Banquet for the sec- 
ond time at the beautiful Northeast 
Westbrook's Drive-In and Restaurant 
on Benning Road in Washington, 
D. C, March 11, 1961. This banquet 
was attended by one of the largest 
groups of Savannahians seen around 
town in a long time. 

Rev. Amor Davis, an alumnus 
and Assistant Pastor of New Bethel 
Baptist Church, 9th and S Streets, 
N. W., Washington, D. C, opened 
the festivities with prayer, after 
which the Toastmaster and Chairman 
Dr. Julius Gooden, introduced all 
members of the local Alumni Asso- 
ciation and their guests. Among the 
many guests were: Mrs. Vera R. 
Trappio, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Robin- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Albert S. Bacon, 
Sr. and Dr. Gordon. 

Mrs. Rosa Moore, former secretary 
of this Chapter, introduced the dy- 
namic, charming an d capable speaker 
of ths i evening, Mrs. Jewel R. Mazi- 
que, who recently returned from an 
extensive tour of Africa, sponsored 
by the Department of State. The sub- 
ject of Mrs . Mazique's remarks was: 
"Can Education Meet The Challenge 
In A Declining Civilization?" The 
speech, which wa s very timely, was 
enjoyed by all. It gave us some in- 
centive to face the many challenges 
we encounter daily and to be more de- 
termined to do everything in our pow- 
er to meet our obligations and make 
plans for the future whereby we can 
be assured of a more beautiful world 
in which to live. 

The Annual Project, which was 
the "Candy Project" for the year 
1960, goes on record as being one 
of the best and most successful pro- 
jects that we have undertaken. Al- 
though we decided to sell dollar cans 
of candy at first, it is well that we 
had Mr. Trappio, who suggested that 
we sell "Katydids" by Katherine 
Beich, an even more expensive candy 
for $1.50, but whose net results 
proved to be to our advantage by 
about one-third of the total receipts, 
as reported by that committee, con- 
sisting of Mr. William Weston, Mr. 
James 0. Thomas and Miss Juanita 
Florence. We congratulate the com- 
mittee for a job well done. 



We especially want to commend 
Mrs. Velma Zeigler and Mr. Ellis 
Trappio for having been the high sell- 
ers in the Candy Project, and awards 
will be presented at a later date for 
their most cooperative and outstand- 
ing work in out-selling everyone else 
who partook in this project. 

Mr. Ledbetter has been elected 
the new Chairman of the Activities 
Committee for this year, and he so- 
licits your suggestions for future pro- 
jects and activities for this Chapter. 

The D. C Chapter congratulates 
Dr. Julius Gooden and his committee 
for a splendid job done as Chairman 
of the Activities Committee for the 
year 1960. 

HOMECOMING 
NOVEMBER 4 

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS 
ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

(Beginning November, 1960) 



Dr. 


& Mrs. William T. Parker 


$25.00 


Mr. 


R. E. Blakeney 


16.00 


Mr. 


Isaiah Mclver 


11.00 


1/L1 


Eunice Wright 


10.50 


Mr. 


Frank Blackshear 


10.00 


Mrs. 


Carolyn A. Roberts 


10.00 


Mr. 


& Mrs. Robert Deloach 


10.00 


Mrs. 


R. B. Wright 


10.00 


Mr. 


Augustus McArthur 


6.00 


Mr. 


Willie Eunice 


6.00 


Mr. 


Forest Hopkins 


5.00 


Mr. 


Benjamin Crawford 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Mazella Sheliman 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Emma Bush 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Lillian Wright 


5.00 


Mr. 


James Nevels 


5.00 


Mr. 


James Deen 


5.00 


Mr. 


Tommie Mitchell 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Rosa Alice Warren 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Lillie S- Lewis 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Gladys Clayton 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Eldeen W. Roberts 


5.00 


Miss 


Nellie Williams 


5.00 


Mr. 


Leroy Brown 


5.00 


Miss 


Inez Bacon 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Minnie S. Jones 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Lillie Allen Powell 


5.00 


Miss 


Rosa Lee Boles 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Freddie LeVern Booker 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Susan W. Berrien 


3.00 


Mr. 


Arthur Williams 


2.50 


Mrs. 


W. H. Frizzelle 


2.00 


Mrs. 


Gladys Burney 


1.50 


(NOTE: Persons who have paid 


thro i 


gh Alumni Chapters will 


be list- 


ed 


in the next issue of The 


Alumni 


Newsletter.) 





FACULTY MEMBER 
RECEIVES SCHOLARSHIP 

Mrs. Margaret Chisholm Robinson, 
Instructor in the Department of Bi- 
ology, is the recipient of a National 
Science Foundation Scholarship to 
attend the Fourth Institute for Col- 
lege Teachers of Botany under the 
direction of the Botanical Society of 
America, Inc. The Institute will be 
held at Washington State University, 
Pullman, Washington, June 26 through 
August 4, 1961; Dr. Adolph Hecht, 
Director. 

The objectives of the institute 
are to give college teachers of bot- 
any the benefit of associations with 
outstanding scholars; to acquaint 
teachers from some of the smaller 
colleges with the latest developments 
in the botanical sciences and, there- 
by, to broaden and strengthen the 
teaching of college botany; to afford 
opportunities for exchanges of ideas 
and experiences pertinent to the 
teaching of college botany and to 
stimulate the parti cipants to engage 
further in research and other scholar- 
ly activities. 

Mrs. Robinson, whose special 
interest is Plant Physiology, is a 
graduate of Savannah State College 
and the University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. She is currently 
employed at Savannah State College, 
the wife of Moses .Robinson and the 
mother of two lovely children. 




James V. Nevels, '60, delivered the 
"Education For Citizenship" ad- 
dress on the Annual Alpha Phi Alpha 
Chapel Program at the College. He 
is currently teaching at Sophronia 
Tompkins High School in Savannah. 
Since graduation, Nevels has worked 
diligently with the Savannah Chapter 
of the Savannah State College Na- 
tional Alumni Association. 



GRIFFIN CHAPTER ORGANIZED 

The Griffin Chapter of the Savan- 
nah State College National Alumni 
Association of the Griffin vicinity is 
an organization of ten members. Mr. 
Lewis L. Banks is President; Mrs. 
Anna Smith Johnson si the Secretary- 
Chairman of the Educational Commit- 
tee; Mr. Earnest S. Spikes is the 
Treasurer; Mrs. M. Lucile Lemon is 
the Chaplain; Mrs. Jo sie S. Spikes 
is the Chairman of the Program and 
Social Committee; Mrs. Thelma John- 
son Roundtree is the Chairman of 
Public Relations; and Miss Mabel 
Cook, Mr. Alvin Willis, Mrs. Hilda 
Willis, and Mrs. Annie Gay are the 
other alumni affiliated with this chap- 
ter. 

Mr. Lewis L. Banks, the Pres i- 
dent of this Chapter, is a 1943 grad- 
uate of Savannah State College with 
a Major in Natural Science and a 
Minor in Social Science. He did ad- 
vanced study at Atlanta University in 
Biology and Education. He obtained 
the Master of Arts Degree in Guidance 
from Columbia University from which 
he also holds the Professional Di- 
ploma; "Educational and Vocational 
Counselor." His work experience 

includes that of being an instructor 
of the illiterates in the Second World 
War with the United States Army; a 
teacher of Science at the Second Ward 
High School of Charlotte, North Caro- 
lina; a teacher of Education and Psy- 
chology at Paine College of Augusta, 
Georgia, where he headed the Tea- 
cher Education Program; selective 
entrance testing for nursing at the 
University Hospital in Augusta, Ga.; 
a teacher of Guidance and Psychology 
at Southern University in Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana; and Principal of 
Whitman High School of Toccoa, Ga. 
Mr. Banks is presently serving as 
Principal of the Moore School in 
Griffin. 

Miss Mable E. Cook, a 1942 grad- 
uate of Savannah State College, re- 
ceived her Master's Degree from the 
Atlanta University. She is a fifth 
grade teacher of the Cora Nimmons 
Schoo I in Griffin. She is a native of 
Griffin. 

Miss Annie A. Gay of Griffin is a 
1959 graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege. She teaches the third grade at 
Moore School in Griffin. 

Mrs. Anna Smith Johnson is a 1946 
graduate of Savannah State College 
who has done further study at the 



Atlanta University. She is a fifth 
grade teacher at the Moore School in 
Griffin. 

Mrs. M. Lucile Lemon is a 1936 
graduate of Savannah State College 
who rec eived the Master of Education 
Degree from Atlanta University. She 
has done additional study at Fisk 
University and is now working toward 
the Ph. D. Degree at Ohio State Uni- 
versity. She is a teacher at the Cora 
Nimmons School. 

Mrs. Thelma Johnson Roundtree, 
a 1943 graduate of Savannah State 
College, holds a Master's Degree 
from the Atlanta University and a 
Certificate in Humanities from Co- 
lumbia University. She is a recipi- 
ent of a John Hay Whitney fellowship 
which included Yale University semi- 
nars as a part of her fellowship ex- 
perience. She is a teacher of Eng- 
lish at the Fairmont High School. 

Mr. E. S. Spikes, the County 
Agent of Griffin- Spalding County, is 
a 1941 graduate of Savannah State 
College. His advanced work has 

been done at Prairie View A. & M. 
College in Texas. 

Mrs. Josie S. Spikes, the wife of 
Mr. E. S. Spikes, is a teacher of the 
fourth grade at the Kelsey School. 
She is a 1949 graduate of Savannah 
State College. 

Mr. Alvin Willis, a 1951 graduate 
of Savannah State College , is the 
County Agent in Henry County. 

Mrs. Hilda Phillips Willis, is a 
1946 graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege, who received her Master's De- 
gree from New York University. She 
has done additional study at Colum- 
bia University. Mrs. Willis, the 
wife of Mr. Willis, is a teacher-coun- 
selor at the Henry County Training 
School in McDonough, Georgia. 




Mrs. Etheleen B. Talbert, serves as 
President of the Bulloch County 
Chapter of the Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alumni Association in 
Statesboro, Georgia. Mrs. Talbert 
is well qualified for her position as 
she is Past W.M. of Cape Jessamine 
Lodge No. 86, Register, Georgia; 
Director of Training Union Workshop 
of P.M.B.A.; former President of the 
American Auxiliary Unit, 528; Chair- 
man of Procedure Book Committee- 
Statesboro District, P. T.A. advisor 
for "y" and 4-H groups. She is also 
a member of the Bulloch County Tea- 
chers and Education Association, the 
National Education Association and 
the American Teachers Association. 





Hattie Marie Patman, "Miss National 
Alumni Association, 1960-61 



Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", College 
Alumni Secretary, has been awarded 
an eight-weeks National Defense Fel- 
lowship to study mathematics at the 
University of Kansas this summer. 
He will leave the College in early 
June and return in August. 

After receiving his B. S. from Sa- 
vannah State, he earned the M. S. 
in mathematics at New York Univer- 
sity Graduate School of Arts and 
Science and did further study sev- 
eral summers. 

At present, in addition to his duties 
as College Alumni Secretary, he is 
an Instructor in the Department of 
Mathematics and Physics. 



Rose Ann Lanier, honor math 
graduate of 1960, has been appointed 
to a $6,345 po sition in the Computa- 
tion and Analysis Laboratory at the 
Naval Weapons Laboratory in Dahl- 
gren, Virginia. 

Captain Virgil R. Ladson, Jr., 
"58", stopped in to chat at Savannah 
State while on his way to Beale Air 
Force Base, California. 

Arnett B. Carroll, "60", was home 
on leave recently. At present, he is 
a Second Lieutenant in the Air Force 
and serves as a Missile Guidance 
Operational Officer. 

Thurnell Johnson, "60", is pre- 
paring to go to Officers Training 
School at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. 

Johnnie Mitchell Champen, "58", 
is now on the faculty of Ballard- 
Hudson High School in Macon, Ga. 

Nathaniel Johnson, "60", bril- 
liant mathematician, is now teaching 
mathematics at Ballard-Hudson High 
School in Macon, Ga. 

Maggie Mae Wilson is now teach- 
ing at Webster County Elementary 
School. 

Annie Mae Huggins, "58", is prin- 
cipal of the Elementary School on 
Daufuskie Island, South Carolina. 

Elizabeth Ann Gable, "57", is a 
Special Education teacher in Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Curtiss Lamarr, "42", is a printer 
in the U. S. Government Printing 
Office in Washington, D. C. 

Benjamin Graham, "55", has been 
promoted to Assistant Comptroller at 
Albany State College. He is also 
President of the Albany Alumni Chap- 
ter. 

Alethia E. Hamilton, "47", is 
teaching at Alfred E. Beach High 
School in Savannah, Georgia. 

Richard Blaylock, "47", is a con- 
tractor in Albany, Georgia. 

Mattie R. Few, "52", is teaching 
in Atlanta, Georgia. 

George E. Varnedoe, "51", is 
teaching in Jesup, Georgia. His 
wife, Rena Wynn Varnedoe, "49", is 
teaching at Liberty County High 
School. 

Benjamin Crawford, "48", was 
visited recently by Prince Jackson, 
Jr., "49", College Alumni Secre- 
tary. They were later joined by 
David Battle, "47", and had a most 
wonderful time talking about "old 
times". 



AiumAu Isn4&lf£ 



E. B. Stevens, "37", is owner 
of the Stevens Funeral Home in Val- 
dosta, Georgia. 

Raleigh Macon, "36", is doing a 
great job in Claxton as Frincipal of 
the Evans County High School. His 
wife, Bernice G. Macon, "36", is on 
his faculty and doing a wonderful job 
with the alumni in Claxton. 

Mary L. Pharr, "56", is teaching 
in Washington Georgia. 

Charles E. Hubert, "41", is 
studying at Washington University in 
St. Louis, Missouri. He has pre- 
viously earned two Master Degrees. 

Floyd Story, "59", is teaching in 
ouena Vista, Georgia. 

Fisher Mosley, "06", is Manager 
of the Central City Funeral Home in 
Macon, Georgia. 

Laura Frazier Batten, "18", is a 
Recreation Supervisor in Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Luke Brinkley, "59", has re- 
ceived a National Science Founda- 
tion Scholarship to study this sum- 
mer. 

James W. Fisher has been made 
Manager of Fellwood Homes in Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 

Johnnye Riley Henderson, "42", 
is teaching in Waycross, Georgia. 

Forrest T. Hopkins, "46", is 
teaching in Gray, Georgia. 

Earl Beard, "59", brilliant math 
graduate, is teaching at Beach High 
School in Savannah, Georgia. 

Julia Beasley James is teaching 
at Montgomery County High School 
in Ailey, Geor gia. 

Benjamin F. Lawton, "02", is 
now retired from teaching and living 
in Columbus, Georgia. 

Irene McLean, "46", is teaching 
in Swainsboro, Georgia. 

Julia M. Walton, "56", is teach- 
ing in Elberton, Georgia. 

Mildred M. Butler, "50", is tea- 
ching in Riceboro, Georgia. 

Willie Russell, "59", is on the 
faculty of St. Pius X High School 
in Savannah, Georgia. 

Carolyn A. Roberts, "51", will 
retire from teaching this month. 



M-RS. BETTY S. LEONARD 
IS "SECRETARY OF THE YEAR" 

The rare but needed combination 
of personality, tact, and efficiency 
proved to be the ingredients used by 
Mrs. Betty S. Leonard to out-distance 
all other contestants in the Atlanta 
Secretarial League's "Secretary of 
the Year" contest for 1961. 

The contest came to a climax on 
Wednesday, April 26, 1961, when 
more than 400 people, mostly beau- 
tifully dressed Secretaries, attended 
the Hungry Club luncheon, spon- 
sored by the Secretarial League. 
The luncheon was given a challeng- 
ing address by Mrs. A. G. Gaston, 
Vice-President of Gaston's Enter- 
prises of Birmingham, Alabama. 

Mrs. Leonard, who is Secretary 
and Assistant to Dr. Virginia L. 
Jones, Dean of Atlanta University 
School of Library Service, attributes 
her keen interest and efficiency to 
her training in High School at Bishop 
Hughes Memorial (Cathedral) High 
for Girls, New York City, New York, 
after which she won a Bachelor's De- 
gree in Secretarial Science at Savan- 
nah State College, with honors of 
course. 

Mrs. Leonard is the wife of Walter 
J. Leonard, President of Jones- 
Leonard, Inc. They have two chil- 
dren, Anthony Carlton, 8 and Angela 
Michele, 6. 




Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms is currently 
Vice-President of the Savannah State 
College National Alumni Associa- 
tion. Mrs. Sessoms is also Jeanes 
Supervisor of Tattnall and Evans 
Counties. She is one of the greatest 
boosters of her Alma Mater and works 
untiringly to get other alumni to live 
up to their obligations. 



i 






II 



Person s who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -Pn'y f° r admission to the several departments of the col- 
lege. 

Formal Application Required 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal 
application and thereafter submit such credentials as may be 
needed to support the application. Admissions correspondence 
should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 
Savannah State College 
State College 3ranch 
Savannah, Georgia 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mai led d irect ly 
from the applicant's former school to the Director of Admis- 
sions. The application form with instructions may be obtained 
by writing the Director of Admissions. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money 
order, cashier's check, or certified check payable to SAVAN- 
NAH STATE COLLEGE. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 60.00 $180.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 8.00 24.00 

Student Group Insurance (see below) 5.00 1 5.00 

Total Charges-Day Students $ 78.00 $234.00 

Room, doard and Laundry 167.00 501 .00 

Total Charges —Boarding 
Students $245.00 $735.00 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges 
are assessed where applicable. Please see "Explanation of 
Fees". All charges are subject to change at the end of each 
quarter. Normal cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00' 
per quarter. Students are required to secure all books, sup- 
plies and tools necessary for satisfactory completion of 
courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
Students are required to meet their financial obligations 
promptly as condition of their remaining in College. Students 
granted scholarships or work -aid will be notified in writing 
and credit will be made to their accounts accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring 
with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated on the 
Schedule of Fees. 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they main- 
tain satisfactory scholastic averages. These work oppor- 
tunities include such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, 
library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, pantry and 
kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in the several trades 
and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to 
selected students who meet the required standards of scho- 
lastic merit, high character, general promise, and superior 
achievement in certain specific areas of the college program. 

Students interested in National Defense Loan Funds, 
should write Chairman of Student Personnel Services, Sav- 
vannah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

APPLICATION DEPOSIT. A student applying for admis- 
sion for the first time is required to send a deposit of $25.00 
with the application. Upon registration, this amount will be 
applied toward his tuition fee for the first quarter. If the 
applicant decides not to enroll at Savannah State College, he 
is required to file a request for a refund before the deadline 
published in the College Calendar in the catalog. 

GENERAL DEPOSIT. Upon initial registration, eac^ stu- 
dent will be required to make a general deposit of$> .00 
This charge will be applied to the student's account but will 
be returned, less any charges that may have been assessed 
against the deposit for such things as keys, library books not 
returned, laboratory or dormitory breakage, unpaid fees, etc. 

ROOM DEPOSIT. Entering students and continuing stu- 
dents who plan to live in the college dormitories are required 
to submit a Room Deposit of $25.00 with their requests for 
the quarter. If the student is not accepted by the college, 
this deposit will be returned in full. If the student decides 
not to enroll, he is required to file a request for a refund be- 
fore the deadline published in the College Calendar in the 
catalog. 

STUDENT GROUP INSURANCE. The Savannah State 
College student group insurance plan has been designed to 
protect all full time students of the school. The premium of 
$15.00 per year is payable in installments of $5.00 each 
quarter and the student is covered for twelve (12) months— in- 
cluding recess and vacation periods. The insuring company 
will pay up to $250.00 for each accident— regard less of what 
other coverages the student has. Payment is unallocated; the 
plan will pay for any or all of the following: medical and 
surgical treatment by a physician, hospital confinement and 
nurse's services, miscellaneous hospital expenses, and den- 
tal treatment made necessary by injury to natural teeth. 



In I fl V • • 



NOVEMBER 4, 1961 
"THE CHALLENGE OF THE SIXTIES" 

COLLEGE TIGERS WILL MEET THE ALABAMA STATE COLLEGE 



Alumni Meeting Immediately After The Game 
Alumni Dance At Coconut Grove Immediately After Meeting 



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Person s who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to ipn'y f° r admission to the several departments of the col- 
lege. 

Formal Application Required 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal 
application and thereafter submit such credentials as may be 
needed to support the application. Admissions correspondence 
should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 
Savannah State College 
State College 3ranch 
Savannah, Georgia 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed directly 
from the applicant's former school to the Director of Admis- 
sions. The application form with instructions may be obtained 
by writing the Director of Admissions. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money 
order, cashier's check, or certified check payable to SAVAN- 
NAH STATE COLLEGE. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 60.00 $180.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 8.00 24.00 

Student Group Insurance (see below) 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges-Day Students $ 78.00 $234.00 

Room, 3oard and Laundry 167.00 501 .00' 

Total Charges —Boarding 
Students $245.00 $735.00 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges 
are assessed where applicable. Please see "Explanation of 
Fees". All charges are subject to change at the end of each 
quarter. Normal cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00 
per quarter. Students are required to secure all books, sup- 
plies and tools necessary for satisfactory completion of 
courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
Students are required to meet their financial obligations 
promptly as condition of their remaining in College. Students 
granted scholarships or work -aid will be notified in writing 
and credit will be made to their accounts accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring 
with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated on the 
Schedule of Fees. 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they main- 
tain satisfactory scholastic averages. These work oppor- 
tunities include such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, 
library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, pantry and 
kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in the several trades 
and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to 
selected students who meet the required standards of scho- 
lastic merit, high character, general promise, and superior 
achievement in certain specific areas of the college program. 

Students interested in National Defense Loan Funds, 
should write Chairman of Student Personnel Services, Sav- 
vannah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

APPLICATION DEPOSIT. A student applying for admis- 
sion for the first time is required to send a deposit of $25.00 
with the application. Upon registration, this amount will be 
applied toward his tuition fee for the first quarter. If the 
applicant decides not to enroll at Savannah State College, he 
is required to file a request for a refund before the deadline 
published in the College Calendar in the catalog. 

GENERAL DEPOSIT. Upon initial registration, eac 1 ' stu- 
dent will be required to make a general deposit of$> .00 
This charge will be applied to the student's account but will 
be returned, less any charges that may have been assessed 
against the deposit for such things as keys, library books not 
returned, laboratory or dormitory breakage, unpaid fees, etc. 

ROOM DEPOSIT. Entering students and continuing stu- 
dents who plan to live in the college dormitories are required 
to submit a Room Deposit of $25.00 with their requests for 
the quarter. If the student is not accepted by the college, 
this deposit will be returned in full. If the student decides 
not to enroll, he is required to file a request for a refund be- 
fore the deadline published ; n the College Calendar in the 
catalog. 

STUDENT GROUP INSURANCE. The Savannah State 
College student group insurance plan has been designed to 
protect all full time students of the school. The premium of 
$15.00 per year is payable in installments of $5.00 each 
quarter and the student is covered for twelve (12) months— in- 
cluding recess and vacation periods. The insuring company 
will pay up to $250.00 for each accident— regardless of what 
other coverages the student has. Payment is unallocated; the 
plan will pay for any or all of the following: medical and 
surgical treatment by a physician, hospital confinement and 
nurse's services, miscellaneous hospital expenses, and den- 
tal treatment made necessary by injury to natural teeth. 



- 



m ■ ii "v 



"THE 



1961 
THE SIXTIES" 



ALLEGE TIGERS WILL MEET THE ALABAMA STATE COLLEGE 



Alumni Meeting Immediately After The Game 
Alumni Dance At Coconut Grove Immediately After Meeting 



& fflevvv Cf)ri£tma£ anb & $appp J^eto Hear 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Volume 1 — No. 1 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



December. 1959 




Mrs. Sadie D. Steele, Georgia's "Teacher of 
the Year," proudly displays plaque awarded 
her by the National Alumni Association for 
her many outstanding contributions to her 
profession and the Alumni Association. 
Mrs. Steele is currently teaching at Sol C. 
Johnson Elementary School, Savannah, Go. 



Wright Co-Coach 
Of the Year 

The Southeastern Athletic 
Conference recently announced 
that Theodore A. Wright, Sr., 
Athletic Director, head basket- 
ball, track and field coach of 
Savannah State College, has been 
named Co-Coach of the year. 
Mr. Wright who is also Secre- 
tary-Treasurer of the Confer- 
ence has been Athletic Director 
at Savannah State since 1947. 
He is widely known nationally 
in the field of Health and 
Physical Education. Since com- 
ing to the College, he has pro- 
duced a number of champion- 
ship basketball and track teams. 



Savannah State College Receives $4600 
From Alumni Scholarship Fund Drive 



14 SSC Students Make Who's Who 

In American Universities and Colleges 



President William K. Payne 
announced the names of four- 
teen students nominated for 
Who's Who Among Students in 
Universities and Colleges. The 
iinal hat nss been accepltu. 
These students are James Austin, 
business administration major 
from Emery Street High School, 
Dalton, Georgia; James Deen, 
biology major from Alma High 
School, Alma, Georgia; Eleanor 
Johnson, English major from 
A. E. Beach High School, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia; 

Nathaniel Johnson, mathe- 
matics major from Sophronia 
Tompkins High School, Savan- 
nah, Georgia; Willie Mae Julian, 
business administration major 
from Sophronia Tompkins High 
School, Savannah; Geraldine 
Lindsey, mathematics major 
from Hiit.t.n High School, Bain- 
bridge, Georgia; Willie Lester, 
social science major from Union 
Institute, Jefferson, Georgia; 
Yvonne McGlockton, English 
major from A. E. Beach High 
School, Savannah; 

James Nevels, English major 
from A. E. Beach High School, 
Savannah; Sherman Roberson, 
chemistry major from A. E. 
Beach High School, Savannah; 
Rosetyn Scurdy, social science 
major from A. E. Beach High 
School, Savannah; Josie Simp- 
son, English major from A. E. 



Beach High School, Savannah; 
Ruby Sims, mathematics major 
from Ballard Hudson High 
School, Macon, Georgia; and 
Ruby Williams, Home Economics 
major from A. Ji. Beach High, 
Savannah. 

The fourteen honorees met the 
following standards: 2:00 aver- 
age or above; above sophomore 
level; must have been in College 
at Savannah State a year prior 
to being nominated; excellence 
in scholarship; leadership and 
participation in extra-curricular 
and academic activities; char- 
acter; citizenship and service to 
the school, community and 
society; and cases of unusual 
contributions and outstanding- 
contributions will be considered 
and studied by the Administra- 
tive Council. 

Students are first nominated 
by all student organizations in 
good standing and by the de- 
partments of the College. This 
action is in keeping with the 
above criteria. They are then 
cleared through the Business 
Office, Registrar's Office, Per- 
sonnel Office and the Dean of 
Faculty's Office. Thirdly, those 
names which are cleared through ■ 
all four offices, go to the Ad- 
ministrative Council and the 
President of the College for final 
clearance or substitution. 



Directory of National Alumni Officers 

L. D. Law, "31", President 
1603 Vine Street 
Savannah, Georgia 

W. H. McBride, "49", Vice Presi 
dent 
284 Plaza 



Athens, Georgia 
Miss Ruby King, "39" 



Dr. William K. Payne, Presi- 
dent of Savannah State College, 
announced he received $4,600 
from the Alumni Scholarship 
Fund, which includes more than 
$3,000 from local businesses. The 
check was presented by Mr. 
Leonard D. Law, "31", President 
of the Savannah State College 
National Alumni Association. Mr. 
Law serves as personnel assistant 
at the Union Bag and Paper 
Corporation. 

Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", 
Alumni Secretary, served as 
chairman of the Alumni Scholar- 
ship Fund and directed the 
drive. Prince Mitchell, "57", 
served as treasurer for the fund 
and he is also treasurer of the 
Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association. 

Alumni chapter contributions 
were received as follows: Albany 
Chapter — $200; Atlanta Chapter 
— $30 ; Athens Chapter — $85 ; 
Liberty County Chapter $113.50; 
Savannah Chapter— $350; Tatt- 
nall County Chapter — $125; and 
Washington, D. C, Chapter — 
$100. 

In cooperation with the local 
alumni and the college, Mr. 
Jackson was able to secure funds 
from the following businesses 
and professional persons for the 
Alumni Scholarship Drive: Frank 
W. Spencer, General Manager, 
Atlantic Towing Company. $500; 
E. K. Meredith, Strachan 
Shipping Company, $500; James 
R. Lientz, Union Bag-Camp 
Paper Corporation, $500; W. W. 
Sprague, Vice President, Savan- 



Secretary 
210 East Park Avenue 
Savannah, Georgia 



Recording 



Mrs. Elsie A. Brewton, "40", 

Corresponding Secretary 
648 West 34th Street 
Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Mitchell, "57", Treasurer 

Savannah State College 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, "17", Chaplain 
604 Waters Avenue 
Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", 
Reporter 
Savannah State College 



nah Sugar Refining Corporation, 
$500. 

J. V. Ryan, Savannah Pilots 
Association, $150. Donations of 
$100 were received from the 
following: L. C. McClurkin, 
President, Savannah Electric & 
Power Company; N. K. Clark, 
President, The Liberty National 
Bank & Trust Company; The 
Bernard F. Diamond Founda- 
tion, Peter E. Czarny, The 
Shaving Powder Company and 
Reuben Clark, President, Savan- 
nah Bank and Trust Company. 

Ashley K. Dearing, Ashley K. 
Dearing Foundation, Inc., and 
J. C. Lewis, Jr., J. C. Lewis Motor 
Company, Inc., donated $50 each. 

Donations of $25 came from 
the following: R. E. Smiley, Jr. v 
The Great Atlantic & Pacific 
Tea Company; William F. Lynes, 
Jr., Lynes Mortgage Company; 
R. V. Hinely, Vice President, Per- 
sonal Credit Corporation; David 
Rosenweig, David's Super Mar- 
ket, J. C. Metts, M.D.; Lewis, 
Wylly and Javetz, Attorneys-at- 
Law; Charles F. Morgan, 
Desbouillions, Inc.; M. J. Koncul, 
Chatham Home Builders; W. J. 
Bush, District Manager, North 
Carolina Mutual Life Insurance 
Company; J. Milton Lent, Plant 
Manager, American Can Com- 
pany; Nephew K. Clark, Presi- 
dent, The Liberty National Bank 
and Trust Company; Celtus W. 
Bergen, A.I A. -Architects; Ernest 
Bull, Annette's Dairy; George F. 
Hoffman, Dixie Engraving Com- 
pany; and J. S. Poindexter, Jr., 
The Savannah Coca-Cola 
Bottling Company, $20. 




Dr. W. K. Payne accepts $4,600 Scholarship Aid check from Savannah State College 

National Alumni Association president, L. D. Law, "31"; Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", College 

Alumni Secretary, and Prince Mitchell, "57", National Association Treasurer, look on 

approvingly. (See text of Dr. Payne's letter of acceptance to Mr. Law on Page 2.) 



Person s who are at least fifteen years of age ond who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -Ptj'y f° r admission to the several departments of the coi- 




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Page 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



December, 195<J 



The Savannah State College Alumni Newsletter 

The Savannah State Newsletter is published quarterly by 
Savannah State College through the Office of Public Relations 
and Alumni Affairs. 

Dr. William K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson, Jr ^ Editor 

James Nevels Student Assistant 

Wilton C. Scott ! Advisor 



Notes From the Editor's Desk 

The publishing of this Alumni Newsletter is another step in 
Dr. W. K. Payne's plan to make our alumni the best in the country. 
It is just another one of the many investments he has been making 
in the alumni of our College. I am sure you will agree that this 
investment will return handsome dividends to us in the forms of 
scholarship aid for the College and renewed interest in the total 
College program by the alumni. Congratulations for his fore- 
sightedness are certainly in order. 

The fact that white business firms donated more than 69 per 
cent of the $4,600 (this is the largest amount ever given to the 
College by the alumni in a single year), given to the College by 
the alumni should cause many of our alumni to have insomnia. 
It is estimated that we have a potential of 7,000 alumni and we 
are reaching about 3,500 of these. If only 50 per cent of those 
we are reaching had given the $5.00 tax deductible contribution 
asked for in the National Alumni Association Constitution, we could 
have given the College $8,750 plus the $3,250 from the firms for 
a total of $12,000. As it now stands our contributions averaged 
about 20 cents per alumnus. Since only Negro boys and girls benefit 
from the fund, "race pride" should inspire those who have never 
given anything to wake up and help the "faithful few." After all, 
State belongs to all of us and all of us must share in the financial 
burden of scholarship aid to the less fortunate Negro boys and girls. 

It was very enjoyable talking to some of the grads in Athens 
lately. The chapter is on the ball and has never faltered in its 
obligations to the College since its organization four years ago. 
It seems that my old classmate, W. H. McBride, has the organiza- 
tion so busy until everyone looks forward with anticipation to 
attendance at the next meeting. I can remember how hard Miss 
Wilhelmena Hardeman worked to get things going and the ball has 
kept rolling, apparently picking up speed. Mr. Law has said on 
many occasions that if the "spirit" of Athens could be transported, 
our alumni problems would be solved in record time. 

I had a recent opportunity to talk with Charles DuVaul and 
Eddie Lindsey in Columbus. Judging from their enthusiasm, the 
reorganization of the Columbus chapter is going to be the best 
thing to happen to the College in 1959-60. The chapter has invited 
me to come up in the near future and help them complete the 
reorganization and I am looking forward to this meeting. The 
chapter's potential is more than seventy. Congratulations, Colum- 
bus. State appreciates what you have done. 

There are still too many areas in the state and country with 
huge concentrations of grads and no chapters. New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Miami, Kingstree, Greenville, New 
Orleans, New Haven, Tallahassee, are just a few of the out-of-state 
cities that should take note of what Raymond Knight and the 
Washington, D. C, grads have done. Waycross, Griffin, Bainbridge, 
Sylvania, Springfield, Yidalia, Rome, Millcdgcvillc, Sparta, Greens- 
boro, Hogansville, LeGrange, Newnan, Millen, Americus, Woodbine, 
Thomson, Swainsboro, Thomasville, Jesup, Ludowici, Blackshear, 
Sandersville, Louisville, Ocilla, Douglas, Cuthbert, Quitman, Lincoln- 
ton, Vienna, Forsyth and Cairo are some of the cities in the state 
that should have alumni chapters. Many of the cities mentioned 
could easily consolidate their efforts into a single large chapter. 
Lyons and Vidalia, Forsyth and Barnesville are ideal for combina- 
tions. If you need information about organizing, please let us 
hear from you. 

I would like to say thanks to our faculty and grads on the 
faculty for contributing so generously to the National Defense 
Loan Fund at the College. As a result of their generosity and the 
alumni who sent contributions, the College received $16,804 from 
the Federal Government and was able to set up a fund of almost 
$19,000 for worthy but needy students to borrow from this school 
year. (The government provides 90 per cent of the fund.) With 
the same cooperation this year, we can get the same from the 
Government again. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Owens (both grads) con- 
tributed $50 to the fund. 

The deadline for news appearing in the February issue is 
January 20, 1960. Please send your chapter and individual news 
as soon as possible. 

Please send us the name and address of any graduate or former 
student who is not hearing from us. We are doing everything 
possible to locate all of our alumni and you can be a big help to us. 

PRINCE JACKSON, JR., 
Alumni Secretary 




Dr. W. K. Payne delivers Annual Alumni Address at Homecoming Luncheon. Mrs. Payne, 

"First Lady of College," "Willie H. McBride, "49", and L. D. Law, "31", Vice President 

and President of National Alumni Association, respectively, look on attentively. Mr. 

McBride is also President of Athens Alumni. 




Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", College Alumni Secretary, congratulates Johnny Owens, "50", 

on his receiving Master's Degree from Columbia University. Mr. Owens is currently 

organizing Sylvania Alumni. 

President Payne Speaks 

It is a pleasure to greet the alumni and former students of 
Savannah State College at this time. The year 1959 has been one 
of special significance to the College. Some of the most important 
developments planned over the past decade are becoming a reality. 

On September 1, 1959, the New College Library was turned over 
to the Institution by the University System Building Authority. The 
need for this facility has been recognized as essential for a sound edu- 
cational program for many years. Effort has been made to increase 
the number of books, periodicals, and other materials that make a 
good college library. Through special assistance from the Board of 
Regents, the College has increased the staff, removed obsolete and 
useless materials, and provided more than $20,000.00 for additional 
books and other materials. A similar program to be followed for a 
period of several years will further enhance the educational program 
of the Institution. 

In the second place, the year 1959 has brought into reality a 
modern science and technical building. This facility will provide 
adequate housing and equipment for the physical sciences— chemis- 
try and physics, and the most up-to-date technical education center 
on the college level in this section of the United States. The building 
is in the final stages of development and it should be released to 
the College during the early part of the coming year. In addition to 
new facilities for the physical sciences, there will be new facilities 
and equipment for the biological sciences and mathematics. The 
complete renovation of Herty Hall will provide laboratories, equip- 
ment, and space for these latter fields. 

In the third place, the College is proud of the interest and 
enthusiasm of the alumni. Savannah State College is fortunate to 
have a growing and vital organization. The extent to which the 
alumni have shown their interest may be noticed by their frequent 
visits to the Institution, the increase in alumni scholarship funds, 
and the willingness of chapters and individuals to assist the Insti- 
tution in recruiting promising students. These activities and many 
others make us feel that the year 1959 has been significant in the 
development of Savannah State College. 



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December, 1959 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 



President Payne Announces Additional 
Faculty Appointments at SSC 



In making public his new 
faculty appointments, Dr. Wil- 
liam K. Payne pointed out that 
in this group one will find out- 
standing leaders in education 
who have worked in various 
capacities such as deans of col- 
leges, college professors, high 
school teachers, and community 
and civic leaders. 

The new additions to the 
faculty include the following: 
Hayward S. Anderson, Professor 
and Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Business Administra- 
tion, of Thomasville, Georgia. 
Anderson received the B.S. de- 
gree from Georgia State College, 
Savannah; B.S. Northwestern 
University, Chicago; M.B.A., New 
York University, and has done 
work toward the Doctorate de- 
gree at Harvard University, 
Boston. 

Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton, As- 
sistant Professor, Department of 
Education, Fort Valley, Georgia. 
Mrs. Hamilton received the B.S. 
degree from Fort Valley State 
College, Fort Valley, Georgia, and 
the M.A. degree from Atlanta 
University, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Elonnie J. Josey, Librarian and 
Associate Professor, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. Josey received the A.B. 
degree from Howard University, 
Washington; M.A., Columbia 
University. New York; and the 
M.S.L.S., State University of New 
York, Albany, New York. 

Br. Ezekiel H. Miller, Professor 
in the Department of Languages 
and Literature, Christiana, 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Miller received 



the A.B. and B.S. degrees from 
Howard University; A.M., Co- 
lumbia University, New York; 
Post Doctoral Study, Chicago 
University, Wisconsin University, 
and the University of Denver; 
Ph.D., University of Dijon, Dijon, 
France. He has done summer 
study at Wisconsin University, 
Psychomatrics; Chicago Art In- 
stitute, Art Student; University 
of Denver, Special Education for 
Blind and Backward Children; 
and study in Monterrey, Mexico, 
Spanish. 

Mrs. Margaret C. Robinson, In- 
structor of Biology, Savannah, 
Georgia. Mrs. Robinson received 
the B.S. degree from Savannah 
State College and the M.S. from 
the University of Michigan. 

Dr. Paul L. Taylor, Director 
of Testing and Guidance and 
Professor of Education, Darien, 
Georgia. Dr. Taylor received the 
A.B. degree from Johnson C. 
Smith University, Charlotte, 
North Carolina; B.D., McCormic 
Theological Seminary, Illinois; 
M.A., Hartford School of Educa- 
tion, Connecticutt; M.Th., West- 
ern Theological Seminary, Penn- 
sylvania; and the Ed.D., Indiana 
University, Bloomington, In- 
diana. 

Dr. John L. Wilson, Head of 
the Department of Secondary 
Education, Ottawa, Kansas. Dr. 
Wilson received the B.S. degree 
from Kansas State College, Man- 
hattan, Kansas; M.A., University 
of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; 
Ed.D., Indiana University, 
Bloomington, Indiana. 




Dr. Julius Gooden, "46", Chairman of the Biology Department of Bowie State College, 

Bowie, Maryland, chats with Dr. W. K. Payne, President of Savannah State College. 

Dr. Gaoden stopped at College after attending a Scientific Association Meeting in 

Portland, Oregon. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
Directory of Alumni Chapters 

City 

Albany, Ga Mr. Benjamin Graham "55". . .Albany State College 

Athens, Ga Mr. Willie H. McBride "49". .248 Plaza 

Atlanta. Ga. Mr. Arthur Richardson "40". . Samuel Howard Archer High 

Augusta, Ga Mr. Prince Wynn "57" 526 Gwinnett Street Ext. 

Claxton, Ga. Mr. Charles L. Bailey "53". . . .7 Long Street 

Columbus, Ga Mr. Charles DuVaul "26" Spencer High School 

Homerville, Ga Mr. E. T. Whitaker "37" Homerville High and Elem. 

Macon, Ga Mr. John Jordan "49" Ballard Hudson High 

Madison. Ga Mr. Robert Jackson "55" Pearl Street High School 

Mcintosh, Ga Mr. Samuel Smith "48" Liberty High School 

Reidsville, Ga Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms "36". . . Reidsville High and Ind. 

Savannah, Ga Mr. James Luten "38" Sophronia Tompkins High 

Statesboro, Ga Mr. R. W. Campbell "38" 207 Roundtree Street 

Valdosta, Ga Mr. Charles Hall "49" Pine Vale High School 

Washington, D. C Mr. Raymon Knight "53" 3413 22nd St.. S.E., Apt. 104 

Waynesboro, Ga. Mr. R. E. Blakeney "31" Waynesboro High and Ind. 



Appreciation 

Mr. Leonard D. Law, President 
Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association 
1603 Vine Street 
Savannah, Georgia 
Dear Mr. Law: 

Savannah State College is in- 
deed proud of the contribution 
of $4,600 which was presented to 
Savannah State College by the 
National Alumni Association. 

The College is proud that the 
Alumni can come to the aid of 
the students at a time when 
education is so crucial to the 
development of our country and 
the world. You are to be com- 
mended for your special effort 
and success in this major under- 
taking. 

Appreciating your loyalty, 
financial assistance, and con- 
structive interest in the develop- 
ment of the program of the 
College, I am 

Sincerely yours. 

W. K. PAYNE. 
President 



Columbus Alumni 
Reorganizes 

By Eddie T. Lindsey 

Payne, Colston, Hubert, Wiley, 
and Wright were names that 
figured in the chatter at a re- 
cent reorganization meeting held 
by Columbus graduates of Sa- 
vannah State College. 

The meeting was held in the 
conference room of the Fourth 
Avenue Library on October 26. 
C. W. DuVaul, principal of 
Spencer Senior High, served as 
temporary chairman. 

There was surprising enthusi- 
asm exemplified by the group, 
and steps toward reorganization 
began promptly. The group held 
an election which resulted in Mr. 
DuVaul being named President. 
Other officers include Mrs. Eddye 
Moss Blair, Vice President; Mrs. 
Edith James McCray, Secretary; 
Mrs. Dorothy Jackson Thompson, 
Assistant Secretary; Edward 
Robinson, Treasurer; Melton J. 
Allen, Chaplain; Mrs. Ethel Jones 
Ashe, Parliamentarian; Eddie T. 
Lindsey, Chairman of Publicity. 

The meeting was held only five 
days prior to Homecoming which 
was celebrated on October 31. 

Plans are now underway for 
a proposed dinner meeting with 
Mr. Prince Jackson, Alumni 
Secretary, being the guest 
speaker for the occasion. This 
meeting is expected to draw 
every alumnus within the city 
of Columbus and also nearby 
cities. Thomas L. Vann, class of 
'52, is chairman of the committee 
on preparation. 

Curtis P. Harris, also of the 
class of '52, has been given the 
responsibility of arranging a 
basketball game between Sa- 
vannah State College and Ala- 
bama State College to be held 
in Columbus Municipal Audi- 
torium. 

Other anticipated projects in- 
clude the sponsoring of the Sa- 
vannah State College Choral 
Society in a concert at Spencer 
High School and the granting 
of an athletic scholarship to a 
worthy senior athlete of Spencer 
High. 

The chapter is striving to at- 
tain a total membership of 



Atlanta Chapter Initiates 

Membership Drive 

The Atlanta Chapter under 
the presidency of Arthur Rich- 
ardson, "40", principal of Samuel 
Howard Archer High School be- 
gan its current year with a mem- 
bership drive dinner in Atlanta. 
The speaker for the occasion was 
Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", Col- 
lege Alumni Secretary, who was 
masterfully introduced by 
Charles Hubert, "42". 

Mr. Jackson's address centered 
mainly on the obligations of the 
graduate to his Alma Mater and 
the importance of organizing 
alumni Chapters in the various 
cities. He challenged the mem- 
bers and potential members of 
the chapter to make it the 
strongest in the National As- 
sociation. In attendance at the 
meeting and giving challenging 
remarks were L. D. Law, "31", 
National Vice President, and 
Wilton C. Scott, Executive Secre- 
tary of National Alumni Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Universi- 
ties and Public Relations Di- 
rector of the College. 



Athens Chapter 
Sets 1960 Plans 

By Willie H. McBride, "49" 
Athens Chapter President 

Recently, the Athens Chapter 
gave a dance for the teachers of 
GTEA Region 4. This was an- 
other one of the many great 
achievements on the mounting 
list of achievements of the 
Chapter. 

In the Spring, a Scholarship 
Benefit Banquet will be held and 
it is hoped that Dr. W. K. Payne 
and other College dignitaries will 
be present. Plans are being made 
to have John Lawton, "38", Vice 
President of the GTEA appear 
as speaker for the occasion. 

All members and prospective 
members have been asked to pay 
$1 per month from September, 
1959 to June, 1960, making a 
grand total of $10. This amount 
will be divided as follows: $5 for 
National Alumni Association 
Scholarship; $1.50 for National 
Alumni Association membership; 
$1 for Homecoming; making a 
total of $7.50 to be sent to the 
National Alumni Association. 
This will leave $2.50 for the local 
Chapter. 

The present members of the 
Chapter feel that a monthly 
payment of $1 will be more con- 
venient for most people than a 
lump sum payment of $10. If 
you cannot attend the monthly 
meetings and wish to pay your 
dues, you may send them to the 
president, W. H. McBride, 284 
Plaza or Mrs. Emma Browning, 
267 Plaza, Athens, Georgia. 

The College is now publishing 
an Alumni Quarterly and any 
news that you have concerning 
marriages, deaths, civic and pro- 
fessional achievements of gradu- 
ates and former students of the 
College should be sent directly 
to Prince Jackson, Jr., Alumni 
Secretary at the College. 

seventy (70). If that number is 
achieved, the Columbus Chapter 
of the Savannah State College 
Alumni Association will become 
one of the strongest organiza- 
tions in the city of Columbus. 






A 



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Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



December, 1<)59 



ALUMNI BRIEFS 



The recent High School Career Conferences held in Athens and 
Columbus will be among the best held in the State this year. Mrs. 
Rowena B. McCree, "45", is to be highly complimented for the 
great job she performed in Athens in shaping such a wonderful 
program. Charles DuVaul, "26", was the moving force behind the 
wonderful program held in Columbus. 

Alexander Gardner, "57", studied this summer at Florida 
A. & M. University under a foreign language grant. He studied the 
summer before on a National Science Foundation grant at Atlanta 
University. 

Mary Lois Daniels, "56", studied this summer at Florida A. & M. 
University. She studied the summer before at New York University. 
She is at present Librarian and Spanish Instructor at Dunbar 
High School in Green Cove Springs, Florida. 

* * + 

The recent Region II meeting of the Georgia Teachers and 
Education Association was acclaimed one of the best ever held. The 
Regional Director, Samuel Smith, "48", principal of Liberty High 
School, Mcintosh, Georgia, was congratulated by High State Edu- 
cation officials for the magnificent job he performed in conducting 
the meeting. 

Eugene Washington, "49", is now a glass design engineer 
specializing in the building of vacuum systems and the designing 
and repairing of special glass apparatus for the Azusa Plant of the 
Aerojet-General Corporation in the Chemical Division which is the 
largest in the rocket industry and located in Azusa, California. 
Mr. Washington has done further study at the University of 
Southern California. 

William Van Webb, "49", teacher of Biology and Chemistry at 
Central High School in Newnan, Georgia, was granted a stipend 
from the National Science Foundation to study eleven weeks at 
Western Reserve University in Cleveland this past summer. Mr. 
Webb was an outstanding student in College and graduated "cum 
laude." He received his masters degree from Tuskegee Institute 
in 1956. 

James E. Wilson, "57", recently received his Honorable Dis- 
charge from the United States Army. While in College Mr. Wilson 
majored in General Science. 

Emma Lue Jordon, "59", is serving as contact person at the 
Pearl Smith Elementary School in Savannah. The purpose of the 
contact person is to encourage the graduates of that school to 
meet their obligations to "Alma Mater." 

W. Ivey Mack, "50", now assistant counselor of Juvenile Court, 
West Palm Beach, Florida, visited the campus this summer. Since 
leaving Savannah State, Mr. Mack has studied at Florida A. & M. 
University, Tallahassee, Florida. 

* * * 

Larry Young, "48", principal of Lumpkin High School, Lumpkin, 
Georgia, is a member of the Board of Directors of the Jekyll Island 
Development. 

James C. Cooper, Jr., "57", is now on the staff of the Veterans 
Administration Hospital in Tuskegee. 



Richard Fitzgerald, "59" 

igeis Institute at Tuskegee 



is now studying in the Business Man- 
Institute for 1959 SO. 



Freddie Mae William, "59", and Moses Calhoun, "59", were the 
first two recent grads to pay their $5.00 scholarship contributions. 
Miss Williams is currently Book Store Manager at the College. 

Alphonso E. Golden, "57", currently of the U. S. Army, was 
transferred from New Jersey to South Dakota for more training in 
missiles. While at State, Pvt. Golden majored in mathematics. 

Dr. Howard Copeland Williams, "42", Assistant professor of 
Agricultural Economics at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 
was a summer visitor to the campus. Dr. Williams talked with Dr. 
Payne and Prince Jackson, Jr., for at least an hour describing his 
work at Ohio State. Dr. Williams is the husband of Mrs. Blanche 
Braboy Williams, "49". 

Stanley Whittley, "53", is now successfully engaged in Public 
Health work in Detroit. Mrs. Alma M. Whittley, "43", is teaching 
in the Motor City. 

Charles L. Rawls, "37", is Executive Secretary of District II of 
the Georgia Interscholastic Association and doing a great job. He 
is also principal of Atkinson County High School. 

Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, "36", Jeanes Supervisor of Tattnall and 
Evans Counties, participated in a Seminar in Advanced Adminis- 
tration sponsored by the State Department of Education. Partici- 
pation was by invitation and the selections were made by Mr. T. A. 
Carmichael, Director of Negro Education. 




Homer T. Edwards, "31", Principal of Athens High and Industrial School, congratulates 

Mrs. Jessie C. DeLoach, "50", on being awarded a lull year's National Science Founda- 

tion Scholarship to study at Atlunla University in the field of Mathemal^s. Mrs. CeLoucI, 

is currently enrolled at Atlanta University. 



Marriage Announcements 

Miss Shirley Thomas, "58", was 

the June Bride of Willie N. 

Wright, "58". 
Miss Loretta Hagins, "61", was 

the June Bride of E. Gunnar 

Miller, "59". 
Miss Alice Pearl Fletcher, "58", 

was the June Bride of Willie 

Hamilton, "60". 



Annual Christmas Party 

The annual Christmas Party 
for members of the Savannah 
Chapter and their guests will be 
held on December 21, 1959 at the 
Vance Allison VFW Post Num- 
ber 2933. The Post is located at 
511 West Park Avenue. The 
party starts at 9 p.m. 




Officers and members of Washington, D. C, Alumni Chapter get together for reception 
given in honor of National President L. D. Law, who visited and met with Chapter this 
summer. Members are: Back row, left to right, Mr. Loring W. Washington, Mr. Arnett 
Anderson, Mr. William H. Weston, Treasurer; Mr. Cleveland Brown, Mr. James O. Thomas, 
Dr. Julius H. Gooden, Parliamentarian; and Rev. Armor S. Davis. Front row, left to right: 
Mrs. Edwina Washington, Mrs. Eula V. Hicks, Mr. Raymond Knight, President; Mrs. Flossie 
M. Knight, and Mrs. Raos Moore, Secretary. Absent is: Mr. Johnny Johnson, Vice President. 
"Second Generation": Norman B. Elmore, Jr., son of Norman B. Elmore, Sr., "42", inter- 
views recent graduates. They are, left to right: Iris Parrish, "59", Katie Williams, "58", 
and Peter J. Baker, "58". Scene is College Center following Homecoming game. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Bulk Mailing 
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PAID 

SAVANNAH, GA. 
PERMIT No. 142 



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Contribute to Alumni Scholarship Fund 



Ryals to Organize 

Dublin Alumni 

Timothy Ryals, "54", brilliant 
business graduate has promised 
Prince Jackson, Jr., College 
Alumni Secre- 
tary that he and 
Roscoe Brower, 
"53", will organ- 
ize Dublin 
Chapter of the 
Savannah State 
College National 
Alumni Associa- 
tion. Ryals 
stated that there 
were about 30 
alumni in Laurens County and a 
chapter there would work fine. 
While at Savannah State, 
Ryals established himself as one 
of State's most outstanding stu- 
dents. He was 1953-54 Student 
Council President, 1954 "Man of 
the Year," a member of the 
Choral Society, p. member of 
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 
and a member of a host of other 
organizations. 

Since leaving State, he has re- 
ceived the M.A. degree from New 
York University in 1958. 




agent 




Knight President of 

Washington Chapter 

Raymond Knight, "53", is em- 
ployed as an internal revenue 
the Audit Division, 
Baltimore Dis- 
trict, of the U. S. 
Internal Reve- 
nue Department. 
For the past 
three years and 
from Its in- 
cipiency, he has 
served as presi- 
dent of the 
Wash i n g t o n, 
D. C. Chapter. 
Under his administration, the 
chapter has grown in member- 
ship and has succeeded in carry- 
ing out an active program for 
the benefit of the College. 
Among the many things accom- 
plished by the Chapter were the 
Alumni Banquet featuring Dr. 
W. K. Payne as principal speaker, 
the playing of host to Prince 
Jackson, Jr., Alumni Secretary 
and the hosting of L. D. Law, 
National President. The chapter 
has also contacted the Coca-Cola 
Bottling Company through the 
Moss Kendricks Public Relations 
Organization for a scoreboard- 
clock for the College's Athletic 
Field. 

The chapter has never failed 
to send its share to the Alumni 
Scholarship Fund. This past 
June, the chapter gave $100 to 
the College for securing National 
Defense Loan money from the 
government. As a result, the 
government matched the $100 
with $900 making $1,000 avail- 
able to students at the College. 
He has been succeeded as 
president of the chapter by 
James O. Thomas, "56", brilliant 
chemist-mathematician of the 
U. S. Patent Office. This insures 
the chapter's continuous growth. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

fa wmm anopsia 



Volume 1 — No. 2 



SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 



April. 1960 



SSC Grad Awarded 

National Science 

Foundation Grant 

Clifford E. Hardwick, III, "50", 
has been awarded a National 
Science Foundation award to 
study Radiation 
Biology at How- 
ard University 
this summer. 

Hardwick has 
taught at Ef- 
fingham Train- 
ing School, Guy- 
ton, Georgia, 
Savannah State 
and is now 
teaching at Al- 
fred E. Beach High School in 
Savannah. 

He has been notified by the 
University of Pittsburgh that the 
degree of M. Litt in Biology will 
be conferred on him this June. 




* * .< 



Grad Promoted 
To Captain 

The U. S. Air Force informed 

Thomas Turner, "59", that he 

had been promoted to the rank 

of captain. The 

promotion came 

six months after 

Captain Turner 

received his 

Bachelor' degree 

in June. 

Captain Turn- 

1^- er entered Sa- 

i . £Sji vannah State in 

WsmSEBmsm September, 1948 

as a freshman. 

He played varsity football on the 

great SSC team during the 

Slocum-Harris-Turner era and 

received great recognition for 

his rough line play. 

After entering the service be- 
fore graduation he attended OCS 
and was awarded the rank of 
second lieutenant. In January 
of 1959, the Air Force extended 
him six months leave with pay 
to complete his work at the Col- 
lege wnere he graduated "cum 
laude." 

Captain Turner is married to 
the former Emma Mayo, "52", 
and is the father of two daugh- 
ters. He is presently stationed at 
Mountain Home Air Force Base, 
Idaho. 



Alumni to Present 

"Get Acquainted Day" 

The Savannah chapter will 
present its annual "Get Ac- 
quainted Day" program Sunday, 
April 24, 1960, at 6 P.M. in 
Meldrim Auditorium. This pro- 
gram is designed to give current 
students a working knowledge 
of the Alumni Association and 
make good alumni out of them. 



Savannah State College to Participate 
In National Defense Loan 



Savannah State College will 
participate again this year in the 
National Defense Loan. Last 
year, the College received $16,804 
from the Federal Government to 
match $1,867 the Colleg raised 
from the alumni, senior classes 
and firms in Savannah. 

Each College can set up a loan 
fund based on $20 per student. 



On the basis of current enroll- 
ment, Savannah State can set 
up a fund of nearly $19,000. Of 
this amount, the College will 
have to raise $51,900 by June 30. 
The College is relying heavily on 
the alumni to assist in this 
project. (Read "Notes from the 
Editor's Desk" for further de- 
tails.) 



A Close Look at the Vice President 



Willie H. McBride, Vice Presi- 
dent of the Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alumni Association 
is doing a great job with the 
Alumni in the Athens area. 

Elected to the presidency of 
the chapter from its incipiency, 
he has never ceased to keep his 
fellow alumni busy in carrying 
out the non-glamorous but ex- 
tremely important work for the 
benefit of the College. Member- 
ship in the Chapter has con- 
tinued to grow and participation 
in the Alumni Scholarship Fund 
has always been above average. 
The Chapter sponsored Miss 
National Alumni" in 1957 and 
was more than adequately repre- 
sented by the beautiful Miss 
Francie Howard, Miss Georgia 
Brown and Mrs. Evelyn Wright. 

The first alumni chapter 
Banquet was started under his 



administration and featured Dr. 
W. K. Payne as principal speaker. 
Several chapters are now having 
banquets as a result of the 
colossal success of the Athens 
banquet. 

While attending College, Mc- 
Bride was active and vociferous 
in his participation in many Col- 
lege organizations and affairs. 
A well known graduate of the 
1949 class he has continued to 
make great impressions on those 
who know him. 

With the constitution ending 
the great administration of L. D. 
Law, incumbent National Presi- 
dent, the alumni is fortunate to 
have a man of McBride's energy, 
ability and experience to con- 
tinue the great work of L. D. 
Law. 

He is married to the former 
Frances Eberhart, "45", graduate 
of SSC. 




Newly elected officers of the Statesboro Chapter of the Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association. Left to right: John A. Harris, Chairman of Program Committee; Mrs. 
Pearl Bellinger, Treasurer; Mrs. Odessa Hall, Chairman of Membership Committee; Mrs. 
Etheleen Talbert, President; Mrs. Mary J. Jackson, Secretary; Mrs. Alma Kent, Assistant 
Secretary. 



<m 



Person s who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -Pjjly for admission to the several departments of the col- 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet col 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they rr. 

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Page 2 SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

The Savannah State College Alumni Newsletter 

The Savannah State Newsletter is published quarterly by 
Savannah State College through the Office of Public Relations 
and Alumni Affairs. 

Dr. William K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson, Jr., "49" Editor 

Mrs. Lillie Allen Powell, "58" Editorial Assistant 

Miss Rosa Lee Boles, "58" Editorial Assistant 

Wilton C. Scott Advisor 



Notes From the Editor's Desk 

Recently, I have had the opportunity to talk with many 
graduates throughout the State concerning the lack of interest 
shown by many alumni in contributing to the Alumni Scholarship 
Fund. The answer I received from most of them was, "I paid my 
way. No one helped me and I do not feel obligated to help anyone." 
I have thought about this and would like to submit the following 
facts and figures to give you a picture of just what you paid for 
your education. 

According to the Annual Report of the University System of 
Georgia submitted by the chairman of the Board of Regents of 
the University System to the Governor in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Section 32-129 of the Code of Georgia, it cost $523 per 
full-time student per year during 1955-56 at Savannah State Col- 
lege. Of this amount a full-time student paid $90 which is about 
17.2% of the total cost. In 1956-57, it cost $584 per full-time student 
and of this amount a full-time student paid $90 and this as about 
15.4% of the total cost. 

In 1957-58 it cost $708 per full-time student and of this a full- 
time student paid $135 and this is about 19% of the total cost. 
(Matriculation fee was raised from $30 to $45 per quarter 1957-58.) 
You will note that student activities, health and other fees are not 
included in the figures because the State does not provide for this 
part of the College program and must be paid for by the students 
directly. The above figures reveal that almost 85% of the cost of 
a Savannah State grad is the taxpayer's responsibility. No one has 
ever paid all of the cost of his education and should feel more than 
glad to be able to help the unfortunate students who cannot pay 
that 15-20% that the State requires for attendance ot our College. 
Most of us today would not be College grads if the taxpayers were 
as selfish as some of us. 

If you really want to know whether you should contribute to 
the Scholarship Fund, ask yourself the following questions: 

1) Would I have my present job if I did not have my college 
training? 

2) Has my college training hindered me in my progress to 
attain a higher living standard? 

3) Am I more ignorant today than I was before I got my 
college training? 

4) Am I sorry that I went to Savannah State College? 

If your answers to these questions are all "NO," then you are 
obligated to send a contribution to the Scholarship Fund. 

A recent conversation with Arthur Williams, "49", and Martha 
Rawls Smith, "53", was most stimulating because they are going to 
organize a chapter in Jesup on the second Wednesday in April. A 
chapter in Jesup will be of much benefit to the College because 
there are a number of grads there and should influence more Jesup 
students to come our way. With Arthur and Martha (one of State's 
greatest female athletes) paving the way, Jesup should become 
one of our strongest chapters. 

It is very encouraging to see a young grad push forward to 
organize a chapter. Isaih Isom, "58", is doing just that in Valdosta, 
Georgia, where more than 50 graduates are residing. Can't you 
imagine how great that chapter could become if everyone co- 
operated? Of course with Charles Hall, "49", and Maceo Home, 
"50", backing Isaih, I know that Valdosta will be well represented 
at the annual June National Alumni meeting. 

Waldo Anderson, "49", of Woodbine has promised to reactivate 
the chapter there. There are quite a few grads in Camden and 
Charleton counties and an active organization would do the College 
tremendous good. I do hope he will be successful. 

Johnny Owensfl "50", is working toward reactivation of the 
Screven County Alumni. Five years ago, this chapter was one of 
the strongest in the state. If the grads in Screven County cooperate, 
Johnny will have it back among our top chapters. I am looking 
forward to a report from them in June. 

Charles "Lump" Driskell, "47" (all SEAC fullback of 1946), and 
Wilson J. Bryant, Jr., "51", brought greetings from Benjamin 
Graham, "55" (President of Albany Chapter), and the Albany 
Alumni. They said everyone there was not receiving news from the 
College. I know this is true not only of Albany but of many other 
place too. If you know anyone who did not get this newsletter 
please send me his name and address and I will be glad to put it 
in our files. 

I represented the College recently at Tompkins High School in 
Savannah. There were several other State grads on the program 
and I must say that the manner in which Sadie Davis Steele, "47" 
(Georgia's Teacher of the Year), presented "Teaching as a Career" 
to the high school seniors will bring us many of those students 
because anyone would be interested in a college that produced a 



April, 1060 




Charles DuVaul, left, principal of Spencer High School, Columbus, Georgia and president 
of the Columbus chapter, congratulates Coach Thedore A. Wright (center) and basketball 
captain James Dixon (right) upon receipt of NAIA District Six championship plaque. 
Savannah State trounced Florida A & M University and Morris Brown to earn a berth 
in NAIA championship playoff in Kansas City, Missouri. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Directory of Alumni Chapters 



Albany, Georgia 


Mr. 


Athens, Georgia 


Mr. 


Atlanta, Georgia 


Mr. 


Augusta, Georgia 


Mr. 


Claxton, Georgia 


Mr. 


Columbus, Georgia 


Mr. 


Homerville, Georgia 


Mr. 


Macon, Georgia 


Mr. 


Madison, Georgia 


Mr. 


Mcintosh, Georgia 


Mr. 


Reidsville, Georgia 


Mrs. 


Savannah, Georgia 


Mr. 


Statesboro, Georgia 


Mrs. 


Valdosta, Georgia 


Mr. 


Washington, D. C. 


Mr. 


Waynesboro, Georgia 


Mr. 


Roosevelt, L. I., N. Y. 


Mr. 



Benjamin Graham '55 
Willie H. McBride '49 
Arthur Richardson '40 
Prince Wynn '57 
Charles L. Bailey '53 
Charles DuVaul '26 
E. T. Whitaker '37 
John Jordan '49 
Robert Jackson '55 
Samuel Smith '48 

Josie B. Sessoms '36 
James Luten '38 

Etheleen Talbert '48 
Charles Hall '49 
James O. Thomas '56 
R. E. Blakeney '31 
J. T. Patterson 



Albany State College 
248 Plaza 

Samuel Archer High 
526 Gwinnett Street Ext. 
7 Long Street 
Spencer High School 
Homerville High & Elem. 
Ballard Hudson High 
Pearl Street High 
Liberty High School 
Reidsville High & Ind. 
Sophronia Tompkins High 
2 Carver Street 
Pine Vale High School 
3518 21st St., S. E., Apt. 103 
Waynesboro High & Ind. 
21 Fredrick Avenue 



Directory of National Alumni Officers 



L. D. Law, "31", President 
1603 Vine Street 
Savannah, Georgia 

W. H. McBride, "49", Vice 
President 
284 Plaza 
Athens, Georgia 

Miss Ruby King, "39", Record- 
ing Secretary 
210 East Park Avenue 
Savannah, Georgia 



Mrs. Elsie A. Brewton, "40", 

Corresponding Secretary 

648 West 34th Street 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Mitchell, "57", Treasurer 

Savannah State College 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, "17", Chaplain 

604 Waters Avenue 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson, Jr., "49", 
Reporter 

Savannah State College 



grad of her caliber. James E. Luten, "38", is principal. 

Please remember that part of our scholarship money is used 
in the National Defense Loan. For every dollar we provide, the U. S. 
Government puts up nine dollars to match it. This means if we 
can put up $2,000, the government will match it with $18,000 to 
provide the College with $20,000 to lend to poor students. This is 
one of the best opportunities Negroes have had since the emanci- 
pation of our forefathers. 

Please help by sending a $5 contribution to the Alumni Scholar- 
ship Fund. If you can't send $5, send whatever you can because 
each of your dollars will bring $9 from Uncle Sam. Pay your con- 
tribution to your chapter. If you do not have a chapter in your 
town, send it to the College. This contribution is deductible. 

John Lawton, "38", will become president of GTEA this April 
at the convention in Savannah. I believe he is the first grad to 
become president since Homer Edwards, "31", of Athens. Let us 
not spare the applause when he takes the gavel. He will need our 
backing in the years to come. Let us give it to him. 

PRINCE JACKSON, JR., 
Alumni Secretary 



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April, 1960 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 



President's Message 

Before the beginning of the next academic year Savannah State 
College will occupy its new science and technical building. This 
building representing a capital outlay of over $1,000,000.00 will pro- 
vide for a new phase of education. Technological education on a 
college level will be provided for students interested in entering 
the field of industry. With the traditional fields nearing saturation 
points, it is desirable that training and opportunities be provided 
in the areas of demand and expansion. Students trained in the 
various fields of technology will provide for the development of our 
country and for higher individual income. Both of these are essential 
to our national and personal welfare. 

Alumni of the college are among the most important people to 
assist in developing the program. They are in position to know and 
contact the students who are able to do such programs. In every 
community will be found boys who have the ability to do the 
sciences, mathematics, and technological studies. The discovery 
of students who can profit by such training represents a true 
contribution to the country, the college, and the student. Con- 
tributions of this type have many values that increase from year 
to year. There are no limits to the increase in such values. 

It is important that students for such a program be discovered 
early enough for them to develop the proper background. They 
should start preparing for such a program no later than the be- 
ginning of their first year in high school. Along with English and 
social studies, they should concentrate on mathematics and the 
sciences. With programs including the above studies, they will 
not be discouraged when these are extended, expanded, and ap- 
plied in their college programs. Proper background and guidance 
will make the pursuit of education in this area enjoyable and 
rewarding. 

Savannah State College is proud of the manner in which alumni 
have increased their interest and contributions. Their records of 
achievement, their financial contributions, and their good will have 
been encouraging and challenging. It is to be expected that their 
assistance in the development of this new program will be equally 
as outstanding. 



IBM Appoints SSC Grad 
To $7,600 Position 

Immediately after an inter- 
view with Mr. R. L. Jerue, Jr., 
Experienced Recruiting Manager 
of International 
Business Ma- 
chines Corpora- 
tion of Pough- 
keepsie, New 
York, Clarence 
Johnson, "53", 
Math graduate 
of Savannah 
State College 
was given a 
$7,600 position. 
He was given a choice of work- 
ing as a Programmer in the Ad- 
vanced Computational Systems 
or as a Programmer in the De- 
sign Automation. Mr. Jerue fur- 
ther stated that IBM would 
benefit from Johnson's associa- 
tion with the corporation. 

After leaving Savannah State 
in June, 1953, Johnson joined the 
Air Force where he attended five 
schools in IBM programming. His 
work in the Air Force was so 
well thought of that Major Gen- 
eral K. K. Tibbetts of the U. S. 
Air Force wrote to General 
Acheson, ". . . Also particularly 
appreciated is the machine room 
type assistance provided by your 
Air Material Area to Tapeka Air 
Force Depot during the data 
processing period. The willing- 
ness of A/3c Clarence Johnson 
to assist at all times in the 
operation of the computer was 
most commendable." 

"It is requested that all per- 
sonnel of your Air Material Area 
who participated in Project UAL, 
especially A/3c Clarence Johnson 
and the key Supply and Statis- 
tical Service personnel who 
assisted at the Tapeka process- 
ing center, be appraised of this 
letter of appreciation." 



Basketball at Savannah State 





Lawton Addresses 
Statesboro Alumni 

Addressing a packed room of 
forty Savannah State graduates, 
John Lawton, "39", principal of 
Willow Hill Elementary School 
and Vice President of the Geor- 
gia Teachers and Education As- 
sociation, stressed values in re- 
lationship of graduates to Alma 
Mater. Holding his audience 
spellbound, Lawton drove home 
the point of graduates' obliga- 
tions to the College. He urged 
each graduate to live up to these 
obligations and work together 
for a greater Savannah State. 

Lawton was masterfully in- 
troduced by Robert E. (Baldy) 
Ellison, "50". 



SSC Tigers Upset Favored 
Florida A & M— 95-89 

Savannah State's Little Davids 
cut down the Goliaths of Florida 
A and M 95-89 in a thrill-choked 
seesaw ball game, which had the 
geyser-belching tumult of a 
volcano in Yellowstone National 
Park. The Tigers in winning 
played Jack In the Beanstalk as 
they cut down the towering 
Rattlers to their size in a 
brilliantly played game in the 
Morehouse College Gym. 

It was vindication for the Sa- 
vannah State quintet, which 
had been aroused by charges 
that it was an unworthy foe. 
Pumped with go-go as a result 
of press notices that SSC was 
traveling in fast company, the 
explosive Tigers made their 
critics eat bitter crow. 

Playing for keeps and with 
fearless fortitude, SSC proved 
that good little men can chop 
down the largest Redwoods in 
the forest. This they did with an 
axe sharpened with moxie and 
guts, in tumbling the favored 
Rattlers from their lofty summit. 

SSC had come to Atlanta 
direct from the SEAC tourna- 
ment at Albany State, where the 
Tigers, defeated Claflin 72-70 
and raced past Florida Normal 
102-76. Florida A & M had 
turned back Morris Brown 74-65 
in the finals of the SIAC tourna- 
ment at Tuskegee Institute. 

Unawed by the Rattler prestige 
the Tigers moved into combat 
with an eagle-eye, springs in the 
heels with a rebounding trade- 
mark and clutch-savy which 
paid off in dividends with gilt- 
edge coupons. 

Savannah State led Florida 
A & M 26-24 with 10 minutes 
gone and although the Tigers 
trailed 49-43 at halftime, the 
chant was already echoing the 
toll for the Rattlers. The differ- 
ence was the Rattlers could 
never pull away, and were on 
the embarrassing end of a 74-69 
deficit with 10 minutes to play. 
The outcome by then was never 
in doubt. With eight minutes to 
play Savannah State led 78-71. 
The Tigers were ahead 84-78 
and 3.53 on the clock and with 
1.41 to go it was 91-85. 

It was nip-and-tuck all the 
way. The score was knotted at 
14-14, 16-16, 18-18, 20-20, 22-22, 
24-24, 26-26, 33-33, 34-34, 36-36 
and 54-54, before Savannah 
State made its winning bid. It 
was Redell Walton and Ira Jack- 
son, the All SEAC gamesters who 
put the whammy on the Rattlers 
with 13.0 to play in the second 
period. Walton put the Tigers 
ahead 55-55 with 13:20 to go 
and his sizzler fired the oven 
and put the sign of calamity 
on the Rattlers. 

Ira Jackson took scoring 
honors for Savannah State's 
climb the mountain to thriller 
over FAMU with 31 points. Redell 
Walton had 27 for second place 
honors. Willie Tate was credited 
with 17 points to take third place 
in the scoring freebee. 

Steve Kelly, Elijah McCrow, 

Bob Rollins, and Al McLean were 

the targeteers who muzzed the 

skyscraper of FAMU. 

Melvin Johnson was second with 



13. Ruben Young was third with 
12. Nat Barnes had 12. 

James Stanley took high point 
honors for the Rattlers with 27. 



Savannah State Tigers Defeat 

Morris Brown Wolverines 

76-70 

Savannah State, the Cin- 
derella team of the first annual 
District 6 NAIA Eastern Division 
Play-off, rode a missile-style 
chariot loaded with the com- 
pulsion of desire, in racing over 
Morris, 76-70, Saturday night in 
the Morehouse College Gym- 
nasium. 

The victory gave the Tigers a 
round trip ticket to the March 
7-12 NAIA Championships in 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Savannah State, the Cin- 
derella team from the South- 
eastern Athletic Conference, had 
proved its mettle in the opening 
round by toppling the skyscrap- 
ing Florida A & M Rattlers, 
champions of the Southern 
Intercollegiate Athletic Confer- 
ence basketball tournament, 95- 
85. This giant-killing feat, which 
electrified a screaming crowd, 
was vindication for the Sea- 
siders, who had been charged 
with being an unworthy foe. 

Morris Brown went into Satur- 
day's fray with a 22-5 record. 
Two of these victories were 
chalked up at the conference 
tournament at the expense of 
Alabama A and M, 91-68 and 
Benedict, 76-65. 

Savannah State turned back 
Claflin 72-70 and Florida Normal 
and Industrial Institute 102-76 
in the SEAC tournament at 
Albany State. The Lilliputian 
SSC team came to Atlanta with 
blood in its eye, and the fury 
was quickly spent on Florida 
A & M. 

Angered by accusations that 
SSC had been impotent against 
SIAC quintets, the Tigers who 
fired back that they had beaten 
BMethune Cookman and Clark 
College in visitation play, 
charged Atlanta newspapers 
with bias reporting in pinning 
up clippings of stories that they 
had lost each of the SIAC en- 
counters. SSC had bowed to 
Benedict 98-95, and 98-87 and 
Allen University, last place 
finisher in the SIAC, 110-107. 

Edged on and playing with a 
chip on their shoulders, the 
SEAC haymakers were in the 
mood for a whole lot wind- 
milling and flailing against the 
SIAC treetoppers. Against 
Florida A & M, the Tigers 
achieved this end by pulling the 
Rattlers out of their full court 
press and then jumped on a 
fire engine and stampeded goal- 
ward as though on a five alarm 
castatrophe. 



SSC 88 — Southwest Texas 
College 101 

Kansas City, Mo. (SNS)— Sa- 
vannah State College lost a 
heartfelt game to Southwest 
Texas College 101 to 88. Savan- 
nah State scored 19 points more 
than any team Southwest Texas 
played this season. The previous 
nigh was Southwest Louisiana 
65, Southwest Texas College 69. 
Southwest Texas was compelled 

(Continued on Page 4) 



<iixm 



Person s who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -p*j'y f° r admission to the several departments of the coi- 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet co! 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they rr. 

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Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



April, 1960 



ALUMNI BRIEFS 



Robert Jordan, "46", is now a curriculum supervisor in the 
Miami Florida School System. Every report received from there 
points out the wonderful job he is doing. He is married to Geraldine 
Jordan, "49", and is the father of two fine sons, Robert II, and 
Lawrence. Mrs. Jordan is also employed in the Miami System. 

* * * 

James Wells, "50", is now employed in the Miami School System. 
In his last conversation with Prince Jackson, Jr., College Alumni 
Secretary, he stated that Miami was a wonderful place to live. 
He is married to the former Catherine Johnson, "50", and she is also 
employed in the Miami System. 

Irish Parrish, "59", is now teaching commercial subjects at 
Ocilla High & Industrial School, Ocilla, Georgia. 

Joseph Mitchell, "59", is now teaching mathematics at Ocilla 
High & Industrial School, Ocilla, Georgia. 

Susie Bonner, "59", is now teaching and coaching girls' basket- 
ball at Washington High School in Blakeiy, Georgia. According to 
our last reports, her team won in the semi-finals at Waycross, 
Georgia and won third place in the State "A" finals at Fort Valley, 
Georgia. 

Johnny Moton, "57", is now teaching Industrial Arts at Wash- 
ington High School, Blakeiy, Georgia. 

Dorothy Harp, "50", is now doing secretarial work at Florida 
A & M University, Tallahassee, Florida. 

* * * 

Nathaniel A. Thomas, "51", is now principal at Mill Creek Ele- 
mentary School in Bryan County. He was "Teacher of the Year" for 
1958-59 and is now serving as president of Bryan County Teachers 
Association. He is married to the former Priscilla Robinson, "55", 
and the father of Deborah Mae, a little girl. 

Louise Virginia Milton, "53", "Miss National Alumni" 1959-60, 
is employed at East Broad Street School in Savannah. 

* * * 

Clarence Lofton, "53", is now Industrial Arts teacher and D. C. T. 
Coordinator at Carver High School in Douglas, Georgia. 

Priscilla Thomas, "55", will be conferred with the Master's De- 
gree in Elementary this June at Bradly University, Peoria, Illinois. 
She attended the University the summers of 1957, 1958 and 1959. 
While attending, she became a member of the Graduate Club and 
the Arts and Crafts Club. As a result of the later she minored in 
Arts and Crafts. 

Lt. Colonel Richard W. Williams, Jr., "41", is now at Headquarters 
XIII, U. S. Army Corps, Fort Devens, Massachusetts. 

* * * 

Bobby Brown, "52", former SSC great halfback-quarterback, 
basketballer and trackman is now teaching in the Chicago, Illinois 
School System. He is primarily responsible for the present great 
SSC basketball team. 

* * * 

Lenora Mayo, "57", is now residing and teaching in Ustis, Florida. 

* * * 

Ralph Rober«on, "58", is now teaching Mathematics and Science 
at Butler-Baker High School, Eatonton, Georgia. 

Marie Dansby Day, "51", is now secretary at the Phyllis Wheatley 
YWCA in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Ezekiel Thompson, "50", is now teaching Science in Newton, 
Georgia. 

Mary Bogan Ellis, "55", physical education teacher and girls 
basketball coach of Liberty High School, Mcintosh, Georgia, is to 
be congratulated for producing that fine girls basketball team that 
won in the semi-finals at Waycross and finished fourth in the State 
"A" finals. Her better half, Alex Ellis, "51", physical education 
teacher, boys basketball coach and athletic director at Liberty High, 
produced a fine boys team that was eliminated in the State "A" 
semi-finals at Waycross. They are the proud parents of two beau- 
tiful girls, Beryl and Alexis and a handsome young son, Alex II. 

* * * 

Jessie Thompson, "58", is now a secretary at Fort Valley State 
College. Jessie has been there since leaving Savannah State. 

Eugenia Taylor, "59", is now employed in the Chatham County 
School System. She teaches at the DeRenne Elementary School. 

George Thomas, St., "53", is now serving as chairman of the 
department of Mathematics at Shaw University, Riley, North Caro- 
lina. He has been awarded a teaching assistantship at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois for the academic year, 1960-61. He will teach two 
classes of undergraduate mathematics at the University while carry- 
ing twelve semester hours each semester. 




Kneeling, left to right: Arthur Peyton, Raymond Harper, James Dixon, William Day, 

Joe L. Sweet, Stephen Kelly and Willie Tata. Standing, left to right: Alfonso McLean, 

James Davis, Sam Thompson, Robert Robins, Elijah McGrow, Ira Jackson, Leon Wright, 

Redell Walden, Roland Nash and Horace Epps. 



(Continued from Page 3) 

to break its season high all in 
order to defeat the aggressors 
representing NAIA District 6, 
Eastern Division. 

It was nip and tuck all the 
way. The halftime score was 
Southwest Texas 49, Savannah 
State 45. Led by their tourna- 
ment hero last year Charles 
Sharp, Southwest State found 
Savannah State only two points 
behind them in the closing 
minutes of the game. 

Savannah State College lost 
their two aces, Redell Walton 
and Ira Jackson, then Sharp was 
able to find his mark. According 
to most sports writers at the 
game the game was an example 
of a big good man beating a 
very good little man. Southwest 
Texas average height was six 
foot four while Savannah State 
is five feet 11%. This was South- 
west Texas College's fourth ap- 
pearance in the NAIA Tourna- 
ment while this was Savannah's 
first. Southwest Texas is com- 
posed of an all senior team 
against Savannah State's all 
sophomores. The high point man 
for the entire game was Redell 
Walton of Savannah, 32, but he 
was followed by Charles Sharp 
with 31. 

Southwest Texas forced to 
alter their tact against Savan- 
nah State College and Willken- 
ing doing spectacular outside 
shooting. 

Southwest Texas is rated as 
the second best team in the 
NAIA against Tennessee State, 
the NAIA champs. Last year 



Texas only lost by 64 to 62 there- 
fore Savannah State College sur- 
prised its audience by keeping 
within range of the fast moving 
Texans. The previous night 
Southwest Texas defeated Wis- 
consin State College while Sa- 
vannah State defeated Willa- 
mette University of Oregon, 
another highly regarded team. 

During the past season South- 
west Texas won 21 and lost three 
and won the following cham- 
pionships, the AAU Cotton Bowl 
Tournament at Dallas, Texas, 
and the Lone Star Conference 
Championship. 

In looking over the NAIA 
records since 1951, Southwest 
Texas has won eighteen tourna- 
ment games and lost four. 

Savannah State College fans 
should be proud of their sopho- 
more team which made its spec- 
tacular showing in their first 
NAIA National Tournament ap- 
pearance with a one and one 
record. Savannah State College 
season record is 27 to four. 



Savannah State Rips 
Williamette, 85-71 

Savannah State, shaking off 
the early jitters of its first Na- 
tional Tournament appearance, 
stormed past Williamette Col- 
lege of Oregon, 85-71, in the 
opening round of the NAIA 
Tournament Monday. Ahead by 
two at the half, the Tigers broke 
the game wide open after inter- 
mission as Redell Walton and 
Ira Jackson triggered a speedy, 
sure offensive. 



SAVANNAH GTATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Non-Profit Org. 


U. S. POSTAGE 


PAID 


SAVANNAH, GA. 


PERMIT No. 142 






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"13 



COLUMBUS CLASSIC OCT. 8th, 8:00 PM 

HOMECOMING OCT. 15th 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Parade Marshal Named 
By Columbus Chapter 

John H. Smith, Coordinator of 
Distributive Education at Spen- 
cer High School, Columbus, Ga., 
will serve as Pa- 
rade Marshal of 
the Columbus 
Classic Parade 
beginning at 1 
p.m., October 8, 
1960. The parade 
will begin at 9th 
Street and 6th 
1 Avenue, proceed 
north on 6th Avenue to 12th 
Street, west on 12th Street to 
Broadway, south on Broadway to 
9th Street, east on 9th Street to 
6th Avenue. 

Participating in the parade 
will be bands from Spencer High 
School, Columbus; South Girard 
High School, Phenix City, Ala- 
bama; Mother Mary Mission 
Catholic High School, Phenix 
City; and Savannah State Col- 
lege Band. 




Volume 2 — No. 1 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



October, 1960 



Homecoming Plans Set 

Savannah State College will 
square off with Morris College of 
Sumter, South Carolina, October 
15, Homecoming. It is hoped 
that all alumni will return to 
their alma mater that day to re- 
new old acquaintances and cheer 
the team on to victory. Many 
activities are being planned. As 
usual, the day will begin with 
the parade, followed by the 
game, the alumni meeting and 
the Alumni Dance at the Coco- 
nut Grove. 

Dr. W. K. Payne, president, will 
speak to the alumni and "Miss 
National Alumni" will be pre- 
sented along with the new slate 
of officers. Willie McBride, na- 
tional president, will preside at 
the meeting. Prince Jackson, Jr., 
alumni secretary, will read some 
very interesting letters to the 
group that he received during 
the past few months. Refresh- 
ments will be served. 

According to Frank Tharpe, 
Chairman of the Homecoming 
Committee and Marshal of the 
Homecoming Parade, "A World 
of Dreams" is the theme for this 
year's homecoming celebration. 
The theme was selected because 
of its broadness and flexibility. 
The parade will begin promptly 
at 10 a.m. 



Tigers to Play Nine Games 

Oct. 1 Edward Waters Away 

Oct. 8 Fort Valley State Columbus 

(Columbus Classic) 
Oct. 15 *Morris College Home 

Oct.' 22 Benedict College Away 

Oct. 29 Albany State College Away 
Nov. 4 Alabama State Gillege Away 
Nov. 12 Clark College Home 

Nov. 19 Claflin College Away 

Nov. 24 Paine College Home 

All Home Games are to be played at 
2:00 P. M. on the Savannah State Col- 
lege Athletic Field. 

* Homecoming 




Pictured above (left to right) are Mrs. Edith J. Ashe and Mrs. Edith J. McCray who 
are contestants for "Miss Columbus Classic." Both are '56 graduates of Savannah State 
and both are hard workers for their Alma Mater. One of them will be crowned during 
the pre-game show oi 7:45 p.m. 




John H. Smith (left). Parade Marshal of the Columbus Classic Parade, Charles 
DuVaul (center), president of the Columbus Alumni Chapter, and Eddie Lindsey (right), 
publicity chairman of the Columbus Classic, put their heads together to double check 
some plans to make the Classic the biggest affair in the history of Savannah State. 




**<> at?.: 

vi j MB. 




Plans Complete For 

Columbus Classic 

Savannah State College will 
clash with Fort Valley State Col- 
lege, Saturday night, October 8, 
1960. at 8 p.m., in what is hoped 
to be the beginning of an Annual 
Columbus Football Classic. 

The game, originally scheduled 
to be played in Savannah, was 
transferred to Columbus because 
of scholarship reasons (see Notes 
From the Editor's Desk on Page 
2). After learning of the Col- 
lege's scholarship plight from 
Prince Jackson, Jr. and Wilton 
C. Scott, the Columbus Chapter 
decided unanimously to put on 
the game and pack the Colum- 
bus Municipal Stadium. 

Making lightning plans under 
the leadership of Charles Du- 
Vaul, Columbus Chapter Presi- 
dent, it was not long before the 
magnificent efforts began to 
take shape. Committees were 
formed and began to work im- 
mediately. At this writing, a 
"Miss Columbus Classic" contest 
was being sponsored, a souvenir 
program was being solicited, 
alumni in other cities were being 
contacted to assist in the distri- 
bution of tickets, motorcades 
from nearby cities were being 
planned, a big dance after the 
game, a great half-time show 
featuring the Army Sentry Dogs 
of Fort Benning, and weekly 
planning meetings were being 
held. Mr. DuVaul has requested 
every graduate in the state to 
converge on Columbus and make 
this effort a gigantic success. A 
parade will be held that after- 
noon at 1:00 p.m. and if anyone 
should get to Columbus on Fri- 
day, October 7, Vernon Mitchell 
has rented Club 837 to entertain 
that night. Let all of us meet 
in Columbus to back this effort. 

Other officers of the chapter 
are: Vice-president, Mrs. Eddy 
M. Blair; Secretary, Mrs. Edith 
J. McCray; Treasurer, Edward 
Robinson; Chaplain, Milton J. 
Allen. Edward Robinson is chair- 
man of the Steering Committee; 
Charles Thompson is chairman 
of the Souvenir Booklet; Vernon 
Mitchell is chairman of Housing 
and Entertainment; Eddie Lind- 
sey is publicity chairman; and 
J. H. Smith is Parade Marshal. 



Jl 



l,; ■;*'■■ 



Army Sentry Dogs to 
Do Half-Time Show 

Because of the cooperation of 
Fort Benning, the crowd at the 
Columbus Classic will be treated 
to a special half-time show by 
the Army Sentry Dogs. 






turn 



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sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to ;pjjly for admission to the several departments of the col- 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet col 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they rr. 
— ■=- - •• ' • ' brk on. 



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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



October, 1960 



The Savannah State College Alumni Newsletter 

The Savannah State Newsletter is published quarterly by 
Savannah State College through the Office of Public Relations and 
Alumni Affairs. 

Dr. William K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson, Jr., '49 ...'. Editor 

Miss Rosa Lee Boles, '58 Associate Editor 

Mrs. Lillie Allen Powell, '58 Associate Editor 

Wilton C. Scott Technical Advisor 



Notes From the Editor's Desk 

Several alumni have asked, "Why was the Fort Valley State- 
Savannah State College Football Game transferred from Savannah 
to Columbus? I will try to answer this question by giving some 
information most alumni do not know but should know. 

In 1953, after having the most disastrous football season (total 
score, 452-6), the alumni of the College met with Dr. Payne and 
promised to give more assistance to the College so that our football 
team would never have another season like 1953. As a result, the 
Alumni Scholarship Fund was born. We promised to raise $10,000 
but were only able to get $2,400. Although we fell short, this $2,400 
was $2,300 more than the alumni had given the year before. When 
I returned to the College as a faculty member and Alumni Secretary 
in 1955, the Alumni Scholarship Fund produced less than $500 that 
year. It was that year we began to request businesses and industries 
to contribute to the Alumni Scholarship Fund. In 1956, they gave 
$2,150 of the $3,300 we gave to the College. In 1958, they gave $2,500 
of the $3,600 we gave to the College, and last year they gave $3,500 
of the $4,600 we gave to the College. 

As of this writing, we have received less than $1,500 from busi- 
nesses and industries this year. We have also received less than 
$600 from our alumni. The reasons for this sudden collapse of aid 
from businesses and industries can not be explained in this news- 
letter but should be obvious to the reader if he is abreast of national 
events. However, it should serve to tell most of us to wake up and 
shoulder our responsibilities as graduates of Savannah State Col- 
lege. Although apathy on our part is not the biggest reason for 
businesses and industries deserting us, it must be looked upon with 
great concern. Would you continue to help a poor mother whose 
rich sons and daughters refused to help? Don't you think the above 
figures should have been reversed? Do you think the above figures 
justify the existence of at least 7,000 employed alumni? Do you 
think that the meager amount of scholarship aid we have been 
contributing to the College is adequate? 

There are many graduates of our College who have never given 
a dime to her upbuilding yet have used the name of the College to 
reach the top. Somewhere, there are over 6,000 of these sons and 
daughters. Yes, there are really less than 1,000 graduates who work 
to push the College. 

The answer to the question then is, the game has been changed 
from Savannah to Columbus because of vastly inadequate scholar- 
ship funds. It has been changed because most of Savannah State 
Alumni have not grown to the point where they are willing to 
support their alma mater. It has been changed because the College 
must maintain a strong scholarship program in order to attract 
top notch students. It has been changed because $5 per year is 
too much money for Savannah State grads to give to help other 
Negro boys and girls receive a College Education. But most of all, 
it has be°n changed because we have pot GROWN UP as alumni. 
I hope the question has been answered adequately. 

The biggest reason for the desertion of the Alumni Scholarship 
Fund by businesses and industries will be explained at the Home- 
coming meeting. 



Tigers Open Against 

Edward Waters of 

Jacksonville, Florida 

With highly talented freshmen 
who have been called by Robert 
"Nancy Hanks" Slocum, the 
"cream of the crop" and the vet- 
eran players from last year, the 
Savannah State Tigers are rated 
to be 7 to 5 over a strong Ed- 
ward Waters College team that 
is virtually unchanged from last 
year. The Tigers will roam in 
Edward Waters territory, Jack- 
sonville, Florida, October 1, 1960. 

Showing improvement each 
minute over last year's stellar 
performances are Captain Elijah 
McGraw, a powerful, fleet, sure- 
handed end who has been called 
the best since Curtis P. Harris, 



and John Strong, one of the 
leading ground gainers in the 
Southeastern Atlantic Confer- 
ence last season. 

The forward wall has enough 
beef to stop a freight train. Av- 
eraging better than 200 pounds, 
the line will be led by tackles 
Floyd Walker, 270 pounds; Wen- 
dell Mcintosh, 206 pounds; Eddie 
Bell, 180 pounds; Charles Gaines, 
191 pounds; guards, James Bow- 
ens, 195 pounds; Duke Cum- 
mings, 205 pounds; Eddie Tol- 
bert, 190 pounds; and centers, 
Calvin Roberts, 178 pounds, and 
Benjamin Spann, 202 pounds. 
The -h a If b ac ks average 180 
pounds and the fullbacks aver- 
age 190 pounds. All of this spells 
TROUBLE for the Tigers' foes 
this season. 




v V 





An overflowing crowd packed Beach Hiah School Auditorium recently to witness 
the "stepping down" of Wilton C. Scott as Supervisor of the Beach High Adult Center. 
Scott has been succeeded by Robert Young, a 1938 graduate of Savannah State who was 
also named principal of the Negro Vocational School in Savannah. Under the leadership 
of Scott, the Center grew from a few to one of the largest Negro Centers in the South. 
Under the leadership of the dynamic Robert Young, the continued growth of the Center 
is a certainty. In the picture above, Young congratulates Scott. 

Mr. Young holds a B.S. degree from Savannah State College and an M.S. degree 
from Cornell University. 

He entered the Chatham County school system in 1940 as an Agricultural teacher 
ot Haven Home School and remained in that position until 1959, when he went to Alfred 
E. Beach High School, assuming duties in the same capacity. 

His early administrative offices included, Principal of the Pin Point Adult Night 
School, Principal-teacher of the Arlington Vocational High School, Arlington, Georgia, 
and Supervisor of the O.S.Y.A. National Defense Program. 

Other affiliations and awards include: the Founding of the Montgomery Community 
House. The project was dedicated in 1949. Awarded the Delaware Trophy by Savannah 
State College Alumni Association in 1949 for outstanding achievement; Elected President 
of Theta Chapter, Phi Delta Koppa Fraternity, Cornell University in 1952; Is listed in 
Who's Who in American Education; Served as Chairman of Advisory and Planning Council 
to Superintendent of Chatham County Public Schools; President of Chatham County 
Teacher's Association, 1956-58; and in 1958 was chosen Chatham County Teacher of 
the Year and Region 11 Teacher of the Year. Mr. Young is a member of the Montgomery 
Baptist Church and Chairman of the Trustee Board. 

Directory of National Alumni Officers 



W. H. McBride, '49, President 

284 Plaza 

Athens, Georgia 
Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, 

Vice President 
Tattnall County High & 

Industrial School 
Reidsville, Georgia 
Mrs. Marie B. Martin, '46, 
Recording Secretary 
Wiliiam James High School 
Statesborb, Georgia 



Mrs. Esther S. Bryant, '59, 

Corresponding Secretary 

1017 West 37th Street 

Savannah. Georgia 
Prince Mitchell, '57, Treasurer 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson, Jr., '49, Reporter 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, '17, Chaplain 

604 Waters Avenue 

Savannah, Georgia 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Directory of Alumni Chapters 



Albany, Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Augusta, Georgia 
Claxton, Georgia 
Columbus, Georgia 
Dublin, Georgia 
Homerville, Georgia 
Jesup, Georgia 
Macon, Georgia 
Madison, Georgia 
Mcintosh, Georgia 
Reidsville, Georgia 
Savannah, Georgia 
Statesboro. Georgia 
Valdosta, Georgia 
Washington, D. C. 
Waynesboro, Georgia 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr- 
Mr. 
Mrs. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Benjamin Graham '55 
Willie H. McBride '49 
Arthur Richardson '40 
Prince Wynn '57 
Charles L. Bailey '53 
Charles DuVaul '26 
Timothy Ryals '54 
E. T. Whitaker '37 
Arthur Williams '49 
John Jordan '49 
Robert Jackson '55 
Samuel Smith '48 
,. Josie B. Sessoms "36 
James Luten '38 
Etheleen Talbert '48 
Charles Hall '49 
James 0. Thomas '56 
R. E. Blakeney '31 



Albany State College 
248 Plaza 

Samuel Archer High 
526 Gwinnett Street Ext. 
7 Long Street 
Spencer High School 
Oconee High School 
Homerville High & Elem. 
Wayne Co. Training School 
Ballard Hudson High 
Pearl Street High 
Liberty High School 
Reidsville High & Ind. 
Sophronia Tompkins High 
2 Carver Street 
Pine Vale High School 
3518 21st St., S. E., Apt 103 
Waynesboro High & Ind. 



Converge on Columbus — When? Saturday, Oct. 8 
Who? All SSC Alumni — Why? To Beat Fort Valley 




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October. 1960 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 




FIRST LT. EUNICE M. WRIGHT 

U. S. WAC CENTER, Fort Mc- 
Clellan, Ala., Aug. 25, 1960— First 
Lieutenant Eunice M. Wright of 
Savannah, Geoigia, was pre- 
sented a Letter of Commenda- 
tion prior to her recent depar- 
ture from the U. S. Women's 
Army Corps Center, Fort Mc- 
Clellan, Alabama, for a new as- 
signment at Fort Knox, Ken- 
tucky. 

The award, presented by Lt. 
Colonel Lucile G. Odbert, com- 
manding officer of the U. S. 
Women's Army Corps Center, 
cited Lt. Wright's excellent per- 
formance of duty and efficient 
handling of training problems 
during her assignments as in- 
structor and platoon officer with 
the basic training battalion. 

A graduate of the A. E. Beach 
High School, Savannah, Lt. 
Wright holds a degree in Busi- 
ness Administration from Sa- 
vannah State College and was 
employed as secretary to the 
president of the college before 
accepting a direct commission in 
the Women's Army Corps in Sep- 
tember 1958. 

She completed the Women's 
Army Corps Officer's Basic 
Course at the Center before re- 
ceiving her first duty assignment 
with the training battalion. 



SSr Grad Attends 

Workshop For Blind 

Mr. David Lurry, 1376 Sanford 
Avenue, Macon, Georgia, partici- 
pated in a graduate workshop 
for Industrial 
Arts Teachers of 
the Blind State 
University of 
New York Col- 
lege of Educa- 
tion at Oswego, 
as one of 12 win- 
ners of graduate 
stipends award- 
ed by the U. S. Office of Health, 
Education and Welfare. 

Participants of the pilot study 
workshop, sponsored by the Of- 
fice of Vocational Rehabilitation 
of the Health, Education and 
Welfare Office, the American 
Foundation for the Blind and 
the American Association for In- 
structors of the Blind, came 
from 12 states. They engaged in 
teaching industrial arts to the 
blind. 

The workshop gave the gradu- 
ate students the opportunity to 






Honor Graduates 

Three members of the Gradu- 
ating Class of August 1960 
graduated with honors. Miss 
Rose Ann La- 
n i e r ' s (cum 
laude) final av- 
erage was 2.4065. 
While at Savan- 
nah State, she 
majored in 
mat hematics 
and minored in 
General Science. 
She participated in many activi- 
ties and among the organiza- 
tions in which she held member- 
ship, were Beta Kappa Chi Na- 
tional Honorary Scientific Soci- 
ety, Alpha Kappa Mu National 
Honor Society and Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority. She is listed in 
"Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities." 

NathanielJohnson (cum laude) 
majored in Pure mathematics 
and minored in Physics. As an 

undergraduate 

he served in 
many capacities. 
He held mem- 
berships in Beta 
Kappa Chi Na- 
tional Honorary 
Scientific Soci- 
ety, Alpha Kap- 
pa Mu Tutorial 
System, Student Council (Vice 
President 1959-601 and Alpha 
Phi Alpha Fraternity. He is 
listed in "Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities." 
His final average was 2.325. 

Clevon Johnson (cum laude), 
as an undergraduate won his 
Bachelor's degree in General 
Science. He mi- 
nored in English. 
As an under- 
graduate he 
served as stu- 
dent assistant in 
the Registrar's 
Office. In addi- 
tion to serving 
on the student 
newspaper and yearbook staffs, 
he was a member of the Student 
Council, Alphi Phi Alpha Frater- 
nity and a host of organizations, 
i arcing Lime out uumig nib 
senior year, 1957-58 to serve a 
hitch in the U. S. Army, he 
gained additional knowledge as 
a meteorologist during the Geo- 
physical year in the far north. 
He returned to the College in 
June 1960 to complete his work. 
His final average was 2.068. 

work with blind students in im- 
proving procedures and tech- 
niques for industrial arts teach- 
ing of the sightless. Experi- 
mental research is being done to 
evaluate teaching procedures 
and tools and machines which 
blind industrial arts students are 
using. 

Mr. Lurry is a member of the 
faculty of Georgia Academy For 
the Blind. A graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, Savannah, 
Georgia, he is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Iuary Lurry, Rt. 3, Box 65, 
Cairo, Georgia. 

The stipends pay all tuition 
and college fees, transportation 
expenses, living expenses and 
the cost of all laboratory ma- 
terials. 





Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne greet Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bryant ('60 and '59 respectively) 
as they prepare to enjoy the President's Lawn Party for the August Graduating Class. 
Bryant served as President of the 1960 August Graduating Class. Mrs. Bryant is currently 
serving as secretory of Alfred E. Beach High School in Savannah. 



Savannah State Alumni 

In Sandersville to 

Organize Chapter 

Reverend Gilbert Dean and 
Eddie Scott assured Prince Jack- 
son, Jr., college alumni secretary, 
this summer of an early fall or- 
ganization in Sandersville. Geor- 
gia. 

The two grads stated that 
there were more than fifty grads 
in the area and the need for a 
chapter was great. All alumni in 
the Sandersville area are being 
urged to watch for the call to 
organize which probably will be 
sent out in the next few weeks. 
Such a Chapter in Sandersville 
should be highly productive since 
many of Savannah State's most 
outstanding graduates are resid- 
ing in the area. 



Savannah State Grads 
Receive Master Degrees 

Several Universities have in- 
formed the Alumni Office at Sa- 
vannah State of Savannah State 
Alumni receiving Master De- 
grees. 

Pittsburg University: Clifford 
E. Hardwick, III, '50; Clarence 
Smith, '51. Florida A. & M. Uni- 
versity: Abbie Lee Barnes, '46; 
Willie A. Clinch, '54; Lillian B. 
Keaton, '49; and Ernestine Gor- 
don Richardson, '51. Atlanta 
University: Jessie Collier De- 
loach, '50; William B. Jackson, 
'50. (Note: Graduates who re- 
ceived degrees this summer 
should inform Prince Jackson, 
Jr., College Alumni Secretary, so 
he can publish it in the Decem- 
ber Newsletter. A small glossy 
photograph should also be sent.) 




Shown above are (left to right) Mrs. Eva C. Bosemon, 
Dr. Walter N. Ridley, and Dr. William K. Payne. Mrs. Boset 
politics at Savannah State College this Spring when she beca 
to be elected President of the Student Council. In the same 
was elected to reign as "Miss Savannah State College." She 
National Alumni President, John McGloclcton. Dr. Ridle; 
ment Address. In addition to being President of Eli 



Miss Yvonne McGlockton, 
ion revolutionized student 
le the first female student 
election, Miss McGlockton 
is the daughter of former 
delivered the August Commence- 
beth City State Teachers College, 



Elizabeth City, North Carolina, he was the first Negro to graduate from the University 
of Virginia where he won his doctorate. Dr. Payne, President of Savannah State College, 
introduced Dr. Ridley and conferred degrees. 






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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



October, 1960 



ALUMNI BRIEFS 



Hosea J. Lofton, '52, served as an Knglish Assistant this summer 
while continuing his studies toward the M.A. degree. He is employed 
by the Lee Street High School in Blackshear, Georgia. 

Clarence J. Lofton, '55, is about to complete his work for the 
M.A. degree in Industrial Education at Bradley University. He is 
now on the faculty of Tompkins High School in Savannah. 

William N. Weston, '56, brilliant U. S. Naval Observatory mathe- 
matician, visited the campus this summer. He was very much im- 
pressed with the new $1,000,000 Technical Center that was used for 
the first time this summer. 

Lois Parrott Canty, '54, is now teaching in Marshallville, Geor- 
gia. Since leaving State, she has studied at the University of Buf- 
falo. Buffalo, New York, in 1959. 

Land S. Ward, '53, is now teaching at New Hope Elementary 
School in Statesboro, Georgia. 

Rufus C. Harmon, '59, is now in Civil Service work at Warner 
Robins Air Force Base. 

Annie Frasier Stewart, '58, is now teaching at the Riceboro Ele- 
mentary School in Riceboro, Georgia. 

Kay Frances Magwood, '59, is now teaching in Cartersville, 
Georgia. She attended Savannah State College this summer and 
paid her alumni dues before leaving. 

Julia Baker Latimore, '57, visited the campus recently. Mrs. 
Latimore is teaching at the School of the Deaf in Cave Spring, 
Georgia. 

Benny Brown, '49, is now superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds at Virginia State College, Petersburg, Virginia. 

James Wilson, '57, is now teaching Science at Waynesboro High 
and Industrial School, Waynesboro, Georgia. 

Joseph Burroughs, '59, is now teaching Industrial Arts at Tomp- 
kins High School, Savannah, Georgia. 

Timothy U. Ryals, '54, president of the Dublin, Georgia Chapter, 
sent the College greetings from London, England. 

Norman B. Elmore, '41, principal of Florence Street School, 
Savannah, was recently named "Safe Driver of the Week" in Savan- 
nah. Mr. Elmore has been driving for over 25 years without an 
accident. 

Walter Strickland and Helen Gordon, Strickland, members of 
the 1950 class, attended summer school at Savannah State this 
summer. Walter is principal of Providence Elementary School in 
Temple, Georgia. 

Prince Jackson, Jr., Alumni Secretary, and Wilton C. Scott, 

Director of Public Relations, were entertained by the Harrison 
Millers of Hamilton, Georgia. The guests fished in the Millers' huge 
pond but had no luck. Harrison and Prince had a grand time 
recalling the glorious days at "State." 

Ida Girven, '51, former SSC basketball great, and Dorothy Harp, 

'50, spent the Labor Day weekend in Savannah looking up class- 
mates and old friends. Both are faculty members of Florida A. & M. 
University, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Gwendolyn Davis, '59, is now studying at Atlanta University on 
a National Science Foundation Fellowship. While at SSC she ma- 
jored in general science. 

Jessie M. Thompson, '59, a. former secretary at Fort Valley State 
College, is now teaching at the Harris Street Area Trade School in 
Savannah, Ga. 

Ruth Walker, '53, is now teaching at the Harris Street Area 
Trade School in Savannah. Mrs. Walker formerly served as secre- 
tary to Felix J. Alexis, superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
at SSC. 

Tharon Stevens, '51, is now serving as President of the Bulloch 
County Teachers Association. Mr. Stevens is the highly talented 
and well known director of the famous William James Choral So- 
ciety. Mrs. Stevens, the former Frankie Gross, '51, spent the sum- 
mer at Savannah State studying Art. In getting her Master's degree 
from Northwestern University, she majored in Elementary Educa- 
tion and minored in Art. 

Robert Thweatt, '54, is now on the faculty of the Harris Street 
Area Trade School. 

Grover Thronton, '59, is now teaching Social Sciences at Tatt- 
nall County High and Industrial School, Reidsville, Georgia. 

Evelyn Gordon Porter, '60, is teaching Mathematics at Butler 
Baker High School in Eatonton, Georgia. 

Emma Bush, '60, is now teaching Mathematics at Todd Grant 
High School in Darien, Georgia. 




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Pictured above ore Savannah State College graduates (county agents and home 

instration agents) who brought student members of the State 4-H Club Council from 

in, Georgia to tour the College campus and Savannah Sugar Refining Corporation. 

'eloped that the tour of the campus was more of a tour for many of the graduates 

the students because of the many new buildings that had been built In the last 

years. The group was guest at a luncheon given by the Sugar Plant. 

Standing, left to right, are: First row— Dr. W. K. Payne, Mrs. Remell Jackson, Miss 

jline Meadows, Mrs. Anne Postell, Mrs. Marian T. Deloach, Mrs. Mamie F. Baker, 

Shirley H. Dwight, Ernest Martin, Mrs-. Mattie T. Copeland, Miss Carrie Powell, 

Minnie W. Bell, John Moody, and L. D. Kennedy. Second row— Harrison Miller, 

i Willis, Ernest Spikes, Ellie Gay, John Morgan, Oscar Brooks, Jimmey Douglas, 

Bnce Williams, Fronk Spencer, Eugene Harvey, Charles Ogletree, Richard Robinson, 

rice Littles. Third row— Tom McBride, Luther Coleman, Loomis Jackson, and John 

iders. 



James Luten to Serve as President 
of the Savannah Chapter 

James E. Luten, Principal of Sophronia Tompkins High School, 
was elected to serve another term as president of the Savannah 
Chapter. Mr. Luten, who is in his third year as President, challenged 
the members in the opening meeting to do a bigger and better job 
than what was done last year. 

Other officers elected were: Vice President, Mrs. Amanda 
Cooper; Recording Secretary, Miss Ruby King; Corresponding Sec- 
retary, Prince Mitchell; Financial Secretary, Mrs. Leanna Wilcox; 
Treasurer, Miss Lula Smith; Chaplain, Mr. Edward Greene; Reporter, 
Prince Jackson, Jr. 



"Miss Savannah Chapter" Selected 

Mrs. Priscilla Thomas, '55, was selected by the members of the 
Savannah Chapter as "Miss Savannah Chapter" for the year 1960-61. 
Miss Freddie Mae Williams, '59, and Mrs. Ruth S. Steele, '49, were 
selected as attendants to Mrs. Thomas. All three are great alumni 
workers with the chapter. 

In other actions taken by the chapter, the Homecoming Com- 
mittee headed by Edward Greene was appointed. A special Com- 
mittee headed by Prince Mitchell was appointed to evaluate the 
chapter's program. Money to pay for refreshments for the out of 
town alumni attending the National Alumni Meeting at Homecom- 
ing was appropriated by James E. Luten, President. 

Savaiinali Cliapier LIois Asscssmculs For 

1960-61 Year 

According to Mrs. Madeleine V. Hannar, chairman of the Big 
Package Committee, the following assessments and deadline dates 
are listed for all members of the Savannah Chapter to observe. 

Membership and Homecoming, $3.00 to be paid beginning Octo- 
ber 1; Scholarship, $5.00 to be paid by December 1; National Alumni 
dues and Banquet, $2.50 to be paid by May 1. 

All members of the Chapter are urged to pay on time and co- 
operate with the "contact persons" appointed by Mr. James Luten, 
president. , 

The Chapter meets each fourth Sunday, 4 p.m., at the West 
Broad Street YMCA. All alumni in the Savannah area are urged 
to attend these meetings. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Non-Profit Org. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

SAVANNAH, GA. 
PERMIT No. 142 



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Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -P|jly for admission to the several departments of the coi- 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet co! 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they rr. 



Brlc 




ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

IN DIRE NEED OF 1,000 DONORS 

r™^;: savannah state college 



come One of the 1,000 
(Notes From the Editor's 
Desk.) 



Volume 2 — No. 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



May, 1961 




SSC Math Gratis Receive 
Key Appointments 

Leroy Brown and Willie Eunice, 
recent graduates of Savannah 
State College were appointed to 
key positions as 
mathematicians 
i n Washington, 
D. C, by the 
U. S. Depart- 
ment of Civil 
Service. Mr. 
Brown's position 
pays in excess 
of $6,300 while 
Mr. Eunice's position pays in ex- 
cess of $5,500. 

While at Savannah State both 
men distinguished themselves as 
outstanding students, not only in 
the field of mathematics and 
the physical 
sciences, but 
made great con- 
tributions to 
student life at 
the College. 
Both returned to 
study the im- 
mediate summer 
following their 
June graduation in order to take 
advantage of math courses they 
were not able to get as under- 
graduates. As a result of having 
so much mathematics on their 
transcripts, the U. S. Govern- 
ment was very interested in 
giving them key appointments. 
Prior to their new jobs, Mr. 
Brown was a faculty member of 
Tompkins High School, Savan- 
nah, and Mr. Eunice was a 
faculty member of Center High 
School, Waycross. 





Pictured above are (left) Miss Lonnye 
L. Adams and (right) Miss Deiora Dean. 
Both are 1956 Business Administration 
graduates of the College. Hailing from 
Cordele, they are employed on the staff 
of the Florida A & M University, Talla- 
hassee, Florida. 




If-!.' - 




Prince Jackson, Jr., College Alumni Secretary, has disclosed that Robert E. Blakeney, 
principal of Waynesboro High and Industrial School ond o member of the Class of 1931 
will deliver the Annual Alumni Banquet Address on Saturday, June 3, 1961 at 8:00 p.m. 
Mr. Blakeney has distinguished himself as one of Savannah State's most outstanding 
alumnus and is recognized as a key principal in the State of Georgia. He has played 
an important role in soliciting Alumni Scholarship Funds in the Waynesboro area. As a 
member of the Alumni Roads Committee, he was instrumental in getting the State Highway 
Department to look upon the College favorably. 




Campbell Is President of 
Elementary Principals 

R. W. Campbell, 1938 graduate 
and principal of Edward John- 
son Junior High School, Brooklet, 
Georgia, is now 
serving as Presi- 
dent of the Ele- 
mentary Princi- 
pals Association. 
He recently at- 
tended a na- 
tional conven- 
tion in Atlantic 
City, New Jersey. 
Mr. Campbell has always been 
outstanding in all of his en- 
deavors. As vocational agricul- 
tur teacher, he worked tireless in 
developing the young farmers of 
Bulloch County. All of his spare 
time was spent outside working 
with the youth of Statesboro to 
help them develop into fine men 
and women. He organized the 
Bulloch County Negro Chamber 
of Commerce and the swimming 
pool, telephones, recreation 
center and many other improve- 
ments for Negroes in Bulloch 
County were direct results of his 
work in the Chamber as Execu- 
tive Secretary. As an athletic 
official over the years, he always 
instilled good sportsmanship in 
young people. In 1954, he became 
president of the Bulloch County 
Negro Teachers Association and 
immediately made it into one of 
the smoothest working organiza- 
tions in the State. 

Since becoming principal of 
Edward Johnson, his work-day 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Rev. William T. Parker 

Honored in Princeton 

The Reverend Dr. William T. 
Parker, this past October, 
marked 30 years as pastor of the 
First Baptist Church in Prince- 
ton, New Jersey. 

Before going to Princeton, Dr. 
Parker was pastor of Mount 
Ararat Baptist Church at 
Rutherford, N. J. for four years. 
Prior to that, he was pastor of 
the Second Baptist Church at 
LeRoy, N. Y. for six years. 

In a tribute to Dr. Parker, his 
members said, "Rev. Parker has 
been a wonderful pastor and a 
great leader. He has won the 
recognition as serving longer 
than any pastor called to this 
Church, which is a great credit 
to him. His many accomplish- 
ments will always be remembered 
for many years to come. He has 
proven his love and devotion 
with a great desire to do what 
was best. His quiet and unassum- 
ing way in which he has con- 
ducted himself in the church and 
community has been very im- 
pressive." 

In a tribute to Mrs. Parker, it 
was said, "Congratulations and 
best wishes to our pastor's com- 
panion, Mrs. Daisy Parker, who 
has shared with him thirty fruit- 
ful years. 

"We extend to her our ap- 
preciation for her many years 
of service and wish for her many 
more happy and prosperous 
years." 



~-*J SSC Grads Receive 
^m Master Degrees 

Several Universities have in- 
formed the Alumni Office at Sa- 
vannah State of Savannah State 
alumni receiving Master Degrees. 
Mr. Alphonso McLean, math 
teacher at Beach High School, 
Savannah, received his M.A. 
from New York 
University on 
October 23, 1960. 
Mr. McLean is 
an active mem- 
ber of the Sa- 
vannah State 
Alumni Associa- 
tion and has 
contributed 
much to the growth and develop- 
ment of his alma mater. He has 
a son, Alphonso, Jr., who is to 
graduate in the June Class at 
Savannah State. 

Miss Edna C. Armstrong, 1949 
graduate, received the Master 
Degree in Elementary Education 
from Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, August 12, 1960. While at 
the University, Miss Armstrong's 
interests centered around Guid- 
ance in the Elementary Schools, 
Creative Dramatics, and Reading. 
Miss Armstrong is a member 
of the faculty of the Ralph J. 
Bunche High School in Wood- 
bine and an active member of 
Hamilton Chapel Methodist 
Church. She is also a member 
of Pi Lambda Theta and is Vice 
President of the Camden County 
Unit of the GTEA. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Classes of the "Ones" to 
Be Honored on June 3 

All members of the classes of 
1901, 1911, 1921, 1931, 1941, 1951, 
and 1961, will hold respective 
class reunions at the Alumni 
Banquet, 8 p.m., June 3, 1961, in 
Adams Hall. Former presidents 
of the above classes are urged 
to be present so that they may 
introduce their class members 
to the other alumni in attend- 
ance. Anyone who is a member 
of one of the above classes is 
urged to get in touch with Prince 
Jackson, Jr., College Alumni 
Secretary, so that he can make 
the necessary class arrange- 
ments. Banquet fee for each 
alumnus is $1.50. National dues 
are $1.00 and Scholarship dues 
are $5.00. Every alumnus should 
try to attend so that the class 
of 1961 can be inspired. 



Person s who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -P|jly for admission to the several departments of the coi- 





























Self He 


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Worthy 


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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 




The Savannah State College Alumni Newsletter 

The Savannah State Newsletter is published quarterly by Sa- 
vannah State College through the Office of Public Relations and 
Alumni Affairs. 

Dr. William K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson, Jr., '49 Editor 

Miss Rosa Lee Boles, '58 Associate Editor 

Mrs. Lillie Allen Powell, '58 Associate Editor 

Wilton C. Scott Technical Advisor 

Notes From the Editor's Desk 

Alumni Scholarship Fund in Dire 
Need of One Thousand Donors 

In 1953-54 a group of Savannah State College graduates set out 
to raise $10,000 for scholarships at the College. The plan was simply 
to get at least 1,000 graduates who loved and cared enough about 
the College to contribute $10.00 each to the Alumni Scholarship 
Fund. The plan was only 24% successful since only 240 graduates 
contributed $10.00 for a total of $2,400.00. The following year, the 
number who contributed was only 70 and at a meeting of the Na- 
tional Alumni Associatipn in 1956, it was decided to ask each gradu- 
ate to contribute $5.00 instead of $10.00 because it was the prevailing 
opinion that more graduates would participate. Since that time, 
we have only been able to get an average of 200 graduates per year 
to participate. The rest of our scholarship funds have been given 
by the white merchants and business men of Savannah. However, 
their contributions dropped significantly last year. After reading 
several letters from the merchants, I have reasons to believe we 
can expect even less support from them this year. 

All of this simply means that more of us must give in the future. 
Is $5.00 per year for scholarship too much? From inquiries I receive 
from the U. S. Department of Internal Revenue, I can only say that 
I wish we were getting one-tenth of what some of our graduates 
claim on their income tax forms. Apparently, $5.00 isn't much by 
today's standard. It costs a student $234.00 per school year just for 
metriculation and fees. It would take 47 donors just to award a 
student one year's fees. That is why it is important that more of 
us must give. 

Beginning with this issue of the Newsletter, names of persons 
who contribute will be published. If there is an alumni chapter in 
your city, make your contribution through it. If not, make your 
check or money order payable to Alumni Scholarship Fund, and 
send it to Prince Jackson, Jr., at the College. All persons who con- 
tribute through chapters will be listed in the June issue right after 
chapter reports are in. The list you see on this page are those who 
have contributed for this school year. Please send your contribution 
early in May so that your name may be listed in the May issue of 
the Alumni Bulletin. Please give us your assistance in this matter. 
It is of vital importance to the Alumni. 

THE ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND IS IN DIRE NEED OF 
1,000 DONORS. 



May, 1961 



Pictured above is Mrs. Helen McKemie 
Jones of Byronville, Georgia. Since gradu- 
ation in 1951, Mrs. Jones has proved her- 
self to be the ideal alumna. She has kept 
up with the progress of her Alma Mater 
and attends the Homecoming games. She 
not only pays her scholarship dues but 
goes out of her way to persuade others 
to do the same. 



SSC Player Named 
NAIA All-America 




List of Contributors 
ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

(Beginning November, 1960) 



Dr. and Mrs. William T. 

Parker 

Mr. R. E. Blakeney 

1/Lt. Eunice Wright 
Mr. Frank Blackshear 
Mrs. Carolyn A. Roberts 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 

Deloach 

Mrs. R. B. Wright 

Mr. Augustus McArthur 

Mrs. Lillian Wright 

Mr. James Nevels 



$25.00 
16.00 
10.50 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Mrs 


Rosa Alice Warren... 


5.00 


Mrs 


Lillie S. Lewis 


5.00 


Mrs 


Gladys Clayton 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Eldeen W. Roberts ... 


5.00 


Miss 


Nellie Williams 


5.00 


Mr. 


Leroy Brown 


5.00 


Miss 


Inez Bacon 


5.00 


Mrs. 


Minnie S. Jones 


5.00 


Mr. 


Willie Eunice 


6.00 


Mrs. 


Susan W. Berrien 


3.00 


Mr. 


Arthur Williams 


2.50 


Mrs. 


W. H. Frizzelle 


2.00 


Mrs. 


Gladys Burney 


1.50 



Redell Walton, 6'1" forward on Ted 
Wright's fabulous "Junior Five" was named 
to the third team of the NAIA All-America 
Basketball team. Walton has scored more 
than 2,200 points in three years. Last year 
he scored 854 points in 33 games for a 
25.5 points per game average. He made 
325 of 694 boskets for a 46.8 percentage 
ond 204 of 263 free throws for a 76.1 
percentage. He can play any position and 
professional scouts like his potential as an 
outside man. 




Alumni in Macon 
Reorganize; Sutton 
Elected President 

Realizing the need of a strong 
Alumni Chapter in Macon, the 
alumni in Bibb County recently 
met and elected 
W. J. Sutton 
president. In ac- 
cepting the 
gavel, Mr. Sut- 
ton pledged his 
energies to build 
the chapter into 
the strongest in 
the state. 
The chapter recently invited 
Prince Jackson, Jr., College 
Alumni Secretary, and Wilton C. 
Scott, College Director of Public 
Relations, to one of their regular 
meetings and the two college of- 
ficials were surprised at the 
"spirit" exhibited by the group. 
After hearing separate addresses 
by the College officials, a very 
delightful repast was served. 

Present at the meeting were: 
Mrs. Lula Lewis, Mr. Allen Lewis, 
Mr. Emmett Denerson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Matthew Vinson, Mr. Willie 
J. Horton, Mr. Orell Webb, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Sutton, and Mrs. 
O. R. Mabry. 



SSC Grad Doing 

Excellent Job in Florida 

Mrs. Beatrice B. Robinson is 
now employed as a teacher in 
the Leon County, Florida School 
System. She is 
also enrolled as 
a graduate stu- 
dent at Florida 
Agriculture and 
Mechanical Uni- 
versity, Talla- 
hassee, Florida. 
Recently she 
was initiated in- 




to the Kappa Delta Pi, National 
Society in Education, Theta Iota 
Chapter, Tallahassee, Florida. 

She previously worked as a 
Home Economics Teacher for ten 
years at E. O. Douglas High 
School, Sebring, Florida. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Directory of Alumni Chapters 



Directory of National Alumni Officers 



W. H. McBride, '49, President 

284 Plaza 

Athens, Georgia 
Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, 

Vice President 
Tattnall County High & 

Industrial School 
Reidsville, Georgia 
Mrs. Marie B. Martin, '46, 
Recording Secretary 
William James High School 
Statesboro, Georgia 



Mrs. Esther S. Bryant, '59, 

Corresponding Secretary 

1017 West 37th Street 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Mitchell, '57, Treasurer 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson, Jr., '49, Reporter 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, '17, Chaplain 

604 Waters Avenue 

Savannah, Georgia 



Albany, Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Augusta, Georgia 
Claxton, Georgia 
Columbus, Georgia 
Dublin, Georgia 
Griffin, Georgia 
Homerville, Georgia 
Jesup, Georgia 
Macon, Georgia 
Madison, Georgia 
Mcintosh, Georgia 
Reidsville, Georgia 
Sandersville, Georgia 
Savannah, Georgia 
Statesboro, Georgia 
Valdosta, Georgia 
Washington, D. C. 
Waynesboro, Georgia 



Mr. Benjamin Graham '55 
Mr. Willie H. McBridge '49 
Mr. Arthur Richardson '40 
Mr. Prince Wynn '57 
Mr. Charles L. Bailey '53 
Mr. Charles DuVaul '26 
Mr. Timothy Ryals '54 
Mr. L. L Banks '43 
Mr. E T. Whitaker '37 
Mr. Arthur Williams '49 
Mr. W. J. Sutlon '48 
Mr. Robert Jackson '55 
Mr. Samuel Smith '48 
Mrs. Josie Sessoms '36 
Mr. Eddie Scott '51 
Mr. James Luten '38 
Mrs. Etheleen Talbert '48 
Mr. Isaiah Isom '58 
Mr. James O. Thomas '56 
Mr. R. E. Blakeney '31 



Albany State College 
248 Plaza 

Samuel Archer High 
526Gwinnett Street Ext. 
7 Long Street 
Spencer High School 
Oconee High School 
502 N. Sixth Street 
Homerville High & Elem. 
Wayne Co. Training School 
1601 Anthony Road 
Pearl Street High School 
Liberty High School 
Reidsville High & Industrial 
T. J. Elder High School 
Sophronia Tompkins High 
2 Carver Street 
Pinevaie High School 
3518 21st St., S.E., Apt. 103 
Waynesboro High & Ind. 



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Person s who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -Ph>ly for admission to the several departments of the coi- 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet col 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they rr. 



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May, 1961 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 




Pictured above ore some of the SSC Alumni who watched the Tigers make history 
by defeating Benedict College to win the NAIA District 27 Championship for the second 
consecutive year. The Tigers earned admission to the finals by defeating Morris Browri 
the preceding night. The games were played in Morehouse Gymnasium in Atlanta. 



Statesboro 
Alumni News 

The Statesboro Chapter of the 
Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association has been 
very active during the year. Mrs. 
Etheleen Tolbert, president, has 
had fine cooperation in carrying 
out her broad program. 

A "Stay At Home Tea" has 
been planned and according to 
the committee, Mesdames Mabel 
Garbett, Gertrude Everett, Julia 

the program should be a smash- 
ing success. 

The keynote in the Chapter's 
success, however, has been in the 
individual efforts put forth by 
the members. Mrs. Grace Sim- 
mons has been more than dutiful 
in getting out the programs. 
Mrs. Frankie Stevens and Mrs. 
Pearl Bellinger have done a 
wonderful job in providing the 
music for the meetings. Mrs. 
Geraldine Campbell has been 
ideal in handling the programs 
and Mrs. Mary Jackson has been 
a great Secretary. 

Mrs. Pearl Bellinger was in 
charge of the choral students in 
the Student Day meet held at 
Lyons, Georgia. 

Mrs. Pricilla Tremble is on the 
Resolutions Committee of the 
Bulloch County Teachers Associ- 
ation. 

Mr. Crawford Talbert was a 
delegate to the GTEA State 
meeting in Atlanta. 

Behind the alumni in Bulloch 
County and pushing hard in the 
background is Mrs. Marie Martin, 
Jeanes Supervisor. In every en- 
deavor, she has been the power- 
house. This alone has been re- 
sponsible for much of the 
Chapter's success. Mrs. Martin 
is also serving as secretary of 
the Savannah State College Na- 
tional Alumni Association. 

The most widely known mem- 
ber of the chapter, John Lawton, 
president of the Georgia Teach- 
ers and Education Association, 
presided in a most forceful 
manner at the recent State 
meeting in Atlanta. Mr. Lawton's 
name has been mentioned as a 
possible successor of Mr. L. H. 
Pitts, Executive Secretary. 

The hostesses for the May 



Sandersville Alumni 

Organize Chapter 

Under the dynamic leadership 
of Eddie Scott, Assistant Princi- 
pal of T. J. Elder High School in 
Sandersville, a chapter was 
organized and Mr. Scott was 
elected to serve as the first presi- 
dent. He immediately set up 
committees to get a strong pro- 
gram for the chapter. Members 
of the chapter are: Miss Juanita 
Baker, Mrs. Elizabeth Braddy, 
Mrs. Frankie Brown, Miss Sarah 

IT Qn + loi-, TUTicc Paulino Caniow, 

Mr. Jack Daniel, Mr. J. I. Davis, 
Mrs. Rosa Davis, Mrs. Sallie B. 
Dawson, Mrs. Martha Dean, Rev. 
Gilbert Dean, Mr. John Demons, 
Mrs. Julia Flournay, Mr. James 
Freeman, Mrs. M. S. Gardy, Mrs. 
Mary J. Hall, Mrs. Katie Hood, 
Mr. David Hooks, Mrs. Janie 
Jackson, Mrs. Thomasine 
Joradan,, Mrs. Eloise F. Major, 
Mrs. A. W. Pace, Mrs. Mary E. 
Parker, Mrs. E. K. Pinkston, Mrs. 
Celia Reeves, Mrs. Willie M. 
Rhodes, Mr. Lemuel Robinson, 
Mrs. Gwendolyn Seals, Miss Doris 
Session, Mr. Eddie Scott, Mrs. F. 
M. Stapleton, Mrs. Mary Sutton, 
Mrs. Annie J. Swint, Mrs. 
Dorothy L. Thomas, Mrs. Undell 
Thomas, Mrs. Mildred Wilcher, 
Mr. Virgel Wilcher, Mrs. B. Well- 
ington, Mr. Elmus Williams and 
Mrs. Mary Willis. 



Mrs. Julia P. Bryant 

Receives Citation 

Mrs. Julia P. Bryant was re- 
cently cited for outstanding con- 
tributions and services rendered 
as principal of Pope Junior High 
School, Statesboro, Georgia. 
Previously, Mrs. Bryant received 
a citation from the Georgia Con- 
gress of Colored Parents and 
Teachers after serving nine years 
as Treasurer and Vice President 
of the State organization. She 
has also served as President of 
the Statesboro District. She is a 
life member of the organization. 

She was recipient of the 
Southern Foundation Jeanes 
Teacher Award in 1955 for 20 
years of service. 

meeting are Mrs. Ruby Reeves, 
Mrs. Annie Mae Millen, and Miss 
Frances Tremble. 



Pictured above are some of the Savannah State College Alumni who attended the 
SEAC Tourney in Albany. Savannah State scored more than 235 pointsi in smashing 
Albany State College and Morris College of Sumter, South Carolina, to win the SEAC 
crown for the third consecutive year. 



Alumni in Griffin 
Organize Chapter 

The Alumni in Griffin, Geor- 
gia, met with Prince Jackson, 
Jr., College Alumni Secretary, 
late in 1960 at the home of Mr. 
Ernest Spikes and discussed the 
possibility of an alumni chapter 
in Griffin. As a result of this 
meeting, the group met early in 
1961 and added a new chapter 
to the growing roster of Savan- 
nah State College Alumni 

Cliaplcio. 

The following officers were 
elected: Mr. Lewis L. Banks, 
President; Mrs. Thelma J. 
Rqundtree, Vice President; Mrs. 
Anna S. Johnson, Secretary; Mr. 
Ernest Spikes, Treasurer; Mrs. 
M. L. Lemons, Chaplain; and 
Mrs. J. R. Spikes, Pianist. Other 
members are Miss Annie Gay, 
Mrs. Hilda E. Willis, and Mr. 
Alvin Willis. 

At this writing the Chapter 
was moving forward with its 
program and looking forward to 
more alumni joining from the 
Griffin area. 



D. C. Chapter 
Holds Election 

The Washington, D. C, Chap- 
ter of the Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alumni Association 
recently held its annual election 
and the following slate was 
elected to the Chapter: Mr. 
James O. Thomas, Jr., President; 
Dr. Julius Gooden, Vice Presi- 
dent; Mrs. Eloise E. Alston, 
Secretary; Mrs. Velma R. Zeigler, 
Assistant Secretary; Mr. Loring 
Washington, Treasurer; Mr. Wil- 
liam N. Weston, Parliamen- 
tarian; Mrs. Eula V. Hicks, 
Liaison Officer; Mr. Ellis 
Trappio, Public Relations Officer. 

This slate represents the same 
slate of officers for last year ex- 
cept in the Offices of Secretary 
and Public Relations. 

Earlier this year, Mr. Loring 
Washington, Treasurer of the 
Chapter, sent a check in the 
amount of $75 to the National 
Alumni Association to be used in 
the National Defense Loan Pro- 
gram. 




Campbell Is President 

(Continued from Page 1) 

hours have increased. His de- 
votion to education for Negro 
Youth is so strong that every 
spare moment is taken up read- 
ing and studying for "better 
ways to do a bigger and better 
job." 

He received the master's de- 
gree from Temple University. 

The world needs more R. W. 
Campbells. 

S.Sl! Urnne Rpopivp 

I Continued from Page 1) 

Miss M a 1 s e n i a Armstrong, 
Jeanes Supervisor of Jasper Put- 
nam Counties 
and a member 
of the 1956 Class 
received the 
M.A. degree in 
Education from 
Atlanta Univer- 
sity this past 
summer. Prior to 
becoming a 
Jeanes Supervisor, she was 
awarded a scholarship by the 
Southern Education Foundation, 
Inc. to become a Georgia Jeanes 
Supervisor. Recently, she has 
taken the first steps toward or- 
ganizing an Alumni Chapter in 
the Monticello and Eatonton 
area. 

According to records mailed 
in by alumni recently, the follow- 
ing alumni received degrees dur- 
ing 1960: Tuskegee Institute: 
Walter J. Sutton, Macon, M.Ed.; 
Mrs. Alma Hunter Vann, 
Stephens, C.Ed.; Miss Audria 
Mae Spells, Blackshear, M.A. 

New York University: Mrs. 
Alethia M. Turner, Savannah, 
M.A.; Mrs. Emmalean Holsey 
Bonds, Claxton, M. A.; Mrs. 
Annie Kate Maddox, Climax, 
M.A.. 

Atlanta University: Mrs. Eddye 
L. Jones, Atlanta, M.A.; Mrs. 
Susie M. Smith, New York, M.S.; 
Miss Daisy G. Fraser, Savannah, 
M.A.; Samuel A. Gill, Savannah, 
M.A. 

(Note: Graduates who received 
degrees recently should inform 
Prince Jackson, Jr., College 
Alumni Secretary, so he can pub- 
lish it in the May issue of the 
Alumni Bulletin. A small glossy 
photograph should also be sent.) 



Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who pre- 
sent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound 
health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible 
to -Pw'y for admission to the several departments of the col- 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet col 
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Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



May, 1961 



ALUMNI BRIEFS 



Lawrence Young, '48, is doing a wonderful job as principal of 
Lumpkin High and Industrial School in Lumpkin, Georgia. He has 
been one of the few graduates who has never failed to support his 
alma mater through the years. Prince Jackson, Jr., College Alumni 
Secretary, recently congratulated him for attending every Home- 
coming since 1948. 

Dorothy Delores Mclver, '52, is a medical technologist at the 
Norwalk Hospital, New Canaan, Conn. She is Vice-President- 
President Elect of the local chapter of the National Association of 
College Women. 

Dr. Issac B. Bruton, '15, is a physician in Bowling Green, Ken- 
tucky. His wife, Mrs. Jessie Ohpelia Bruton, '12, is a former student 
of State. Dr. Bruton received his M.D. from Meharry Medical College. 

Sherman L. Roberson, '60, is an Assistant Biochemist at the 
Edsel B. Ford Institute for Medical Research of the Henry Ford 
Hospital in Detroit. He studied at Wayne University this past fall. 
While at State, he was known as "Little Castro." 

Charles B. Driskell, '47, is now the Recreation Director of Carver 
Park Recreation Center in Albany, Georgia. While at State, he was 
all-conference fullback for several years. 

Inez R. Bacon, '60, has been appointed as a Laboratory Tech- 
nician in the Syracuse LMspensary, Syracuse, New York. She recently 
sent congratulations to the Basketball team for being selected to go 
to Kansas City for the Second consecutive year. 

Richard B. Lyles, '51, is working with the Federal Correctional 
Institution at Ashland, Kentucky. Prior to his Kentucky appoint- 
ment, he was Industrial Arts teacher at Tompkins High in Savannah. 

Robert Dobbs, '51, is a City Recreation worker with the city of 
Atlanta. 

Barbara Flipper Watson, '58, is teaching in the Catholic School 
System of Omaha, Nebraska. She previously taught in Savannah. 

Lillian M. Bodison, '51, is teaching mathematics at Fitzsimmons 
Junior High School in Philadelphia. While an undergraduate, she 
made an outstanding record in College. 

Frank D. Blackshear, '57, is teaching and coaching at Pembroke 
Hi?h School. Pembroke. Georeia. While at State, he was an out- 
standing student. 

Dennis Williams, '56, is teaching in the Cnicago, Illinois, Public 
School System. 

Florine Jones Abel, '40, is Supervisor of Manatee County Schools, 
Bradenton, Florida. 

Walter N. Nelson, '12' has retired from teaching in Greensboro. 
N. C. 

Sarah W. Hunt, '49, is teaching in Sparta, Georgia. 

Elnus W. Williams, '50, is principal of Davisboro Academy, Davis- 
boro, Georgia. He is presently serving as president of the local 
county unit of the GTEA. He is also one of the moving forces be- 
hind the newly organized alumni chapter in Sandersville. 

Hubert Tyler, '59, is teaching at Robert Smalls Senior High 
School in Beaufort, S. C. While in College, he was an outstanding 
student. 

Nathaniel A. Thomas, '51, is principal of Mill Creek Elementary 
School in Bryan County. 

Charles E. Thompson, '41, is now with the Columbus Housing 
Authority, Columbus, Georgia. 

Ulyssess E. Baker, '49, is a Real Estate Salesman in Philadelphia. 

Emmalyn J. Franklin, '54, is an Assistant Cataloger in the 
Library at Florida A & M University. She received her masters in 
Library Science in 1958 from Syracuse University. 

Florine Solomon Summers, '34, is Jeanes Supervisor of Candler 
and Jenkins Counties, Georgia. 

Helen Moody Mayes, '38, is Director of Admissions at Albany 
State College. She is also one of the moving forces in the Albany 
Chapter of Savannah State Alumni. 

Emmett Denerson, '58, is teaching at P. G. Appling High School 
in Macon. He was one of the alumni in, Macon who pushed the 
reorganizing of the alumni chapter. 

Solomon Green, '55, received his B.D. degree from Gammon 
Theological Seminary in 1959. He is now teaching in Augusta. 

Lois Hines Pettie, '53, is a Laboratory Technician at Columbia 
Prebysterian Medical Center in New York. 




SSC Grad on WTOC-TV 

Timothy Ryals, who traveled abroad last summer and president 
of the Dublin Chapter of the Savannah State College Alumni, ap- 
peared on WTOC-TV in Savannah on April 4, with his Choral Society 
from Oconee High School. Dublin, Georgia. The 
selections rendered by Mr. Ryals and his group were 
outstanding and well received by all who saw the 
30 minute program. After the program, the group 
spent two hours touring the Savannah State College 
Campus. 

Earlier in the school year, Mr. Ryals sent a 
check from the Chapter in the amount of $78.20 to 
the National Alumni Association. This is significant 
since the Chapter was not quite a year old. 

Savannah Chapter Plans Program 

The Savannah Chapter will sponsor the William James High 
School Choral Society in Concert on April 21, 1961 at St. Phillips 
AME Church at 8:00 p.m., at West Broad at Charles Street. The 
Choral Society is under the direction of the well known conductor, 
Tharon Stevens, a 1951 graduate of Savannah State. The chapter is 
asking each adult to donate $1.00. 

On Sunday, April 30, 6:00 p. m. in Meldrim Auditorium, the 
Chapter will honor all "Teachers of the Year" of the Chatham 
County School System. The main feature of the program will be 
"This is your life" which will reflect the life of one of the members 
of the chapter for the services rendered the community. Immedi- 
ately following the program will be a reception in the College Center. 
Th following officers were elected to serve during 1961-62: Presi- 
dent, James E. Luten; Vice President, Nathaniel Thomas; Recording 
Secretary, Ruby King; Corresponding Secretary, Amanda Cooper; 
Financial Secretary, Leonna Wilcox; Parliamentarian, Leonard D. 
Law; Reporter, Prince Jackson, Jr.; Chaplain, Edward Green. 

The May meeting of the Chapter will be held on May 21, 1961. 
This change in date became necessary because the fourth Sunday 
will have many school programs on the calendar. 

Mr. Luten reminded the chapter recently that three $100 scholar- 
ships must be given now that Sol C. Johnson will graduate its first 
class this year. He urged all graduates to live up to their obligations 
because the Chapter must meet its commitments. 

ALUMNI BRIEra (Conunued) 

Isabelle Heyward Johnson, '41, is an Intelligence Research 
Specialist with the Department of State in Washington, D. C. She 
was recently awarded the 10-year Service Pin and Certificate by the 
Department of State. 

Pearlie Cora Lay, '40, is teaching in Cartesville, Georgia. 

Daniel Washington, '59, is teaching at John W. Hubert Ele- 
mentary School in Savannah. He previously taught at Candler High 
in Metter. 

Clarence Robinson, '56, is a Personnel Clerk in the Navy Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C. 

Darfus R. Fuller, '58, is now principal of Uvalda Elementary 
School, Uvalda, Georgia. 

Piccola Butler Osborne attended the Guidance and Counselling 
Institute, '59-'60 at Peabody College. She is now Guidance Counselor 
at Liberty High in Mcintosh, Georgia. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Non-Prc 


U. S. 1 


PAID 


SAVANNAH, GA. 


PERMIT No. 142 



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